Author Topic: New section for point of the month, and arrows of the month?  (Read 14275 times)

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Offline ScottS

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Re: New section for point of the month, and arrows of the month?
« Reply #30 on: March 24, 2015, 10:33:55 am »
Yep, like how this is coming together. Great work Patrick!  8)
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Offline JackCrafty

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Re: New section for point of the month, and arrows of the month?
« Reply #31 on: May 21, 2015, 08:32:59 am »
Well, the newest issue of the mag is out and they didn't include the description of the Nodena arrowhead in my "From the Pit" article.

So.... what I think I'll do is put the description in the photograph and the "knapping method" in Question #1 (or Answer #1, I should say).

I'm writing the next article now, and the next arrowhead will be the Madison type.  Below is a picture of some rare serrated forms (from Mound 72 Cahokia).  The vast majority are not serrated.


Description:

Madison Arrowheads

Time Period: Late Woodland and Mississippian to Historic (800 to 1800 AD).
Basic Shape: Narrow Triangulate.
Cross Section: Bi-convex, Lenticular, Flattened, or Plano-convex.
Stem Type: Expanding.
Basal Edge: Slightly convex, slightly concave, or flat.
Blade Edge Type: Smooth or (rarely) serrated.
Knapping Method: Preliminary bifaces are made with a combination of percussion and pressure flaking with an emphasis on pressure on the thinnest, most refined examples.  Many show very little final retouch, however.  The surface of the original nodule or spall is sometimes seen on the finished pieces. Final flaking ranges from random to sequential. Distinct median ridges are rare. The widest part of the blade is always at the base.  Re-sharpening is difficult to determine but is assumed to be rare.


« Last Edit: November 12, 2015, 12:25:46 pm by JackCrafty »
Any critter tastes good with enough butter on it. :::.

Patrick Blank
Midland, Texas
JackCrafty (youtube)

Where's the Rock?  Public Waterways, Road Cuts, Landscape Supply, Knap-Ins.
How Do I Cook It?  Light Colors:  200  for 24hrs, 400  for 4hrs, Cool for 12hrs.

Offline JackCrafty

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Re: New section for point of the month, and arrows of the month?
« Reply #32 on: May 21, 2015, 09:11:14 am »
I'm going to post a link to this page in the From the Pit article so that readers can find "more information" on the point type(s).  I'm also making this thread sticky.

 :)
Any critter tastes good with enough butter on it. :::.

Patrick Blank
Midland, Texas
JackCrafty (youtube)

Where's the Rock?  Public Waterways, Road Cuts, Landscape Supply, Knap-Ins.
How Do I Cook It?  Light Colors:  200  for 24hrs, 400  for 4hrs, Cool for 12hrs.

Offline Aaron H

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Re: New section for point of the month, and arrows of the month?
« Reply #33 on: May 21, 2015, 09:19:04 am »
Very cool, thanks Patrick
But those who put their trust in the Lord will find new strength. They will soar high on wings like eagles...     Isaiah 40:31

Offline JackCrafty

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Re: New section for point of the month, and arrows of the month?
« Reply #34 on: September 17, 2015, 06:27:57 pm »
Description:

Desert Side Notched Arrowheads

Time Period: Late Prehistoric to Historic (1100 to 1900 AD).
Basic Shape: Narrow Triangulate.  Blade edges can be straight to incurving (concave).
Cross Section: Bi-convex, Lenticular, Flattened, or Plano-convex.
Stem Type: Expanding, straight, to contracting (rarely).
Basal Edge: Concave, slightly concave, flat, or slightly convex (rarely).  A center notch is sometimes present.
Blade Edge Type: Smooth or serrated.  Serrations range from very fine to large (sometimes resembling extra notches).
Notches: Narrow, deep, side notches (usually one per side) placed well below the midpoint of the blade. Neck width is usually narrow.
Knapping Method: Although sometimes large, the vast majority of these points are small and preliminary bifaces (preforms) were made from thin percussion flakes that were shaped and further refined with pressure flaking.  The surface of the original nodule or flake can sometimes seen on the finished pieces.  The flaking ranges from random to sequential with many flakes traveling past the mid-line, so there is rarely a median ridge on the face(s).  The proportions of the points vary from almost equilateral to long isosceles triangles.  Knapping tools were antler or bone pressure flakers shaped into rods about 1/4 in diameter and 6 long.  Materials varied greatly but chert and obsidian seems to be preferred, with heat treating of the chert probably a common practice.  Side notches were deep, narrow, and placed low on the blade with careful attention to symmetry and alignment.  Narrow necks  (1/2 the width of the blade or less)  are common.  Bases range from slightly to deeply concave but straight or very slightly convex bases also exist.  Basal notching is absent.  Hafting was done with a combination of glue and a thin wrapping of sinew or plant fiber.  The use of foreshafts was common with this type of point.

« Last Edit: September 17, 2015, 06:33:29 pm by JackCrafty »
Any critter tastes good with enough butter on it. :::.

Patrick Blank
Midland, Texas
JackCrafty (youtube)

Where's the Rock?  Public Waterways, Road Cuts, Landscape Supply, Knap-Ins.
How Do I Cook It?  Light Colors:  200  for 24hrs, 400  for 4hrs, Cool for 12hrs.

Offline JackCrafty

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Re: New section for point of the month, and arrows of the month?
« Reply #35 on: September 17, 2015, 06:41:51 pm »
Description:

Perdiz Arrowheads

Time Period: Late Prehistoric to Historic (1200 to 1700 AD).
Basic Shape: Triangulate.
Cross Section: Unifacial, biconvex, Lenticular, Diamond-shaped, Flat, or Plano-convex.
Stem Type: Contracting
Basal Edge: Pointed, rounded, or flat.
Blade Edge Type: Smooth or serrated.
Knapping Method:  Most were made from thin flakes removed from well-prepared and economically processed conical or polyhedral cores. Some examples are curved, when viewed from the side, but most are straight. Preforms are fairly common and are sometimes referred to as "Cliffton" points but this is not a formal type. Flaking ranges from very crude to very well executed with all styles ranging from random to sequential or parallel.  Rework or resharpening seems to exist on some points. Serrations are common and may also range from large to small and crude to extremely fine.  Median ridges are sometimes present and may extend from tip to base.  The stems are always contracting (tapering toward the base) and may be beveled: resulting in a twisted appearance on some examples. Barbs are usually very sharp, long, and pointed but short and/or rounded barbs do exist. Basal tips may be rounded, flat, pointed, or (rarely) concave.  The material used was usually high quality chert, sometimes heat treated, and rarely quartzite or other low quality materials.  Knapping tools were simple and expedient bone or antler pieces used for pressure flaking:  the stems and barbs carefully shaped after the flaking and thinning of the blade.  The use of foreshafts was probably common although some have argued that the bases are well suited to hollow shafts such as river cane.  An interesting side note is the fact that this basic style of arrowhead also exists in other parts of the world, especially in North Africa.

« Last Edit: September 17, 2015, 06:46:11 pm by JackCrafty »
Any critter tastes good with enough butter on it. :::.

Patrick Blank
Midland, Texas
JackCrafty (youtube)

Where's the Rock?  Public Waterways, Road Cuts, Landscape Supply, Knap-Ins.
How Do I Cook It?  Light Colors:  200  for 24hrs, 400  for 4hrs, Cool for 12hrs.

Offline JackCrafty

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Re: New section for point of the month, and arrows of the month?
« Reply #36 on: November 12, 2015, 12:20:02 pm »
Just a quick update:

There has been some trouble getting arrowhead pictures posted correctly in the "From the Pit" column.  That's why there hasn't been a picture in the column lately.  My space in the mag is limited so I will be posting the arrowhead pictures here from now on (as you can see by the latest pictures I posted here).

In the future, I'm going to add more pictures and descriptions to include the entire arrow (a reproduction based on an actual artifact or my own personal interpretaion if no real examples exist) and possibly a bow as well.  Maybe quivers too but I can't make any promises just yet.  There is a lot of time involved in the research.

Anyways, just thought I'd give you guys a heads up on what's going on with the column.  I'll be posting a new arrowhead soon.  I'm writing the next article right now.

(edit)  Oh yeah, I will also post a video link here if I have one.  They will be "abo" style.  Right now I have a couple vids I could post but I want to improve the quality...  so I will be making new vids to cover all previous arrowheads posted here and vids for all the new arrowheads.

OK, that's it.
« Last Edit: November 12, 2015, 12:36:40 pm by JackCrafty »
Any critter tastes good with enough butter on it. :::.

Patrick Blank
Midland, Texas
JackCrafty (youtube)

Where's the Rock?  Public Waterways, Road Cuts, Landscape Supply, Knap-Ins.
How Do I Cook It?  Light Colors:  200  for 24hrs, 400  for 4hrs, Cool for 12hrs.

Offline Majuba Tom

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Re: New section for point of the month, and arrows of the month?
« Reply #37 on: November 15, 2015, 10:38:07 am »
Thank you JC.

Great information and pictures. You keep this up you will be able to publish a book. I like the layout of your examples and would like to have a book like that on my shelf.

Offline GlisGlis

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Re: New section for point of the month, and arrows of the month?
« Reply #38 on: December 02, 2015, 01:56:24 am »
Love the pictures and descriptions
Thankyou very much JC !

Offline bowmo

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Re: New section for point of the month, and arrows of the month?
« Reply #39 on: March 29, 2016, 07:34:09 am »
Just noticed this thread. Very cool.

Offline JackCrafty

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Re: New section for point of the month, and arrows of the month?
« Reply #40 on: April 02, 2016, 09:55:15 pm »
Need to update this thread....  I'm falling behind.   :(
Any critter tastes good with enough butter on it. :::.

Patrick Blank
Midland, Texas
JackCrafty (youtube)

Where's the Rock?  Public Waterways, Road Cuts, Landscape Supply, Knap-Ins.
How Do I Cook It?  Light Colors:  200  for 24hrs, 400  for 4hrs, Cool for 12hrs.