Author Topic: Question on fletching theory  (Read 2194 times)

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Offline JNystrom

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Re: Question on fletching theory
« Reply #15 on: November 03, 2017, 12:02:36 pm »
So... two fletch, anyone? Not the traditional, but the style Monus uses.

Offline joachimM

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Re: Question on fletching theory
« Reply #16 on: November 03, 2017, 01:33:11 pm »
... the most efficient vane is rather tall and short ... But, with natural materials, this isnít so easy to do, especially using feathers. I think the Turkish Flight arrow fletch profile is a pretty good compromise where feathers are concerned. It would require a very stiff feather to go much taller and shorter without fluttering.

Alan

So if stiffness of feather vanes is an issue, why not reinforce them with the most obvious resource to primitive bowyers: (tacky) hide glue?
It might even allow us to use thinner feathers, e.g. chicken or duck wing instead of turkey / goose, the latter being much thicker and causing more drag.
Take a bow, shoot far, aim high

Offline Badger

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Re: Question on fletching theory
« Reply #17 on: November 03, 2017, 01:42:20 pm »
   I was thinking similar, Hide glue on vanes should be fine. I was going to try shellac.

Offline willie

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Re: Question on fletching theory
« Reply #18 on: November 03, 2017, 04:37:37 pm »
It might even allow us to use thinner feathers,   :OK

JNystrom, sounds like something worth trying.

Offline Aussie Yeoman

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Re: Question on fletching theory
« Reply #19 on: November 27, 2017, 08:56:18 pm »
Years ago I was able to examine a crossbow and bolts from Vietnam, brought back from the war as trinkets.

The bolts had a fletching of thinly split bamboo folded into a triangle, bound into a slot. Of course this mean the bolts were double-fletched. The shape of the vanes were short in length but stood high off the shaft, much like the shape of a concord. It was set as close to the back of the bolt as could conveniently be done so secure with a wrapping behind it.

I thought it was fascinating.
Articles for the beginning bowyer, with Australian bowyers in mind:

http://www.tharwavalleyforge.com/articles/tutorials