Author Topic: Plum as core  (Read 575 times)

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Offline BowEd

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Re: Plum as core
« Reply #15 on: March 25, 2020, 02:53:04 pm »
No I don't think we have different bows in mind,and I've got plenty of good proven core wood around me here.If the power and tiller stay the same after 5 years of shooting and well over 10,000 arrows conservatively there is no break down at all.
A chrysall is a chrysall whether it be on a self bow or a horn bow.The bow will lose it's tiller and eventually fold.
« Last Edit: March 25, 2020, 03:08:24 pm by BowEd »
BowEd
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Ed

Offline Bryce

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Re: Plum as core
« Reply #16 on: March 25, 2020, 04:18:20 pm »
Lol ok man.
Clatskanie, Oregon

Offline BowEd

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Re: Plum as core
« Reply #17 on: March 25, 2020, 05:25:36 pm »
Ha Ha...I'm damn near a Missourian these days....You show me exactly what your talking about.And I'll show you.
BowEd
You got to stand for something or you'll fall for anything.
Ed

Offline Bryce

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Re: Plum as core
« Reply #18 on: March 25, 2020, 07:51:26 pm »
Well I wasnít questioning your wood choice or saying youíre doing it wrong. Just thought you might want to try a new kinda wood if you havenít tried it yet. Thatís all amigo.
Clatskanie, Oregon

Offline BowEd

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Re: Plum as core
« Reply #19 on: March 26, 2020, 12:13:21 am »
That's cool,I'm ok.
BowEd
You got to stand for something or you'll fall for anything.
Ed

Offline bownarra

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Re: Plum as core
« Reply #20 on: March 26, 2020, 12:57:46 am »
As a point I think we agree in the most part. But I think we have in mind two different styles of bows in mind.
I have some 3-4mm vinemaple curing if you ever wanted to have a go at it, I could spare a few slats:)

Personally I love plum as a bow wood. A prefer it to Osage to be honest.
That internal friction and fatigue happens to all bows.
When you have how and sinew on either side of your wood, makes it hard to see how well the wood is holding up to frets and that not over time without taking it apart or cutting into it.

No - like I said before the bow style doesn't matter....do you think a pair of buffalo horns know that they are in a mongol bow or a Korean bow.....no they simply feel the strain that is on them. They can either take it or not.
Trust me if your core fails you did something wrong. Just like I said before.
As BowEd says when you learn something yourself, by trial and error, you tend to have conviction in what you are saying.
Cores DO NOT just break for no reason....
The reason a core would break is because it is starting to feel tension. It will only feel enough tension to break it IF the sinew isn't stuck correctly OR is too thin. Of course there may be other reasons but those are the likely candidates.
Just so you know I too have made a good few composites :) A good few failures in the beginning but I stuck at it and came through the other side haha. I'm not just spouting off....

Offline Bryce

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Re: Plum as core
« Reply #21 on: March 26, 2020, 04:41:38 pm »
Yep, never argued any of those points. Wasnít talking about the difference between asiatic bows either. All I did was suggest non porous woods for cores. Most of the books Iíve read suggest non porous woods and the peopleís that I consider masters of the craft also suggested to me when I started to use nonporous woods. When I asked why thatís the reasons they gave me; they deal with internal friction well, and something about the way they absorb glue. Myself Iíve never had a bow fail. And the core and still be riddled with fractures and still shoot. James showed me a bow he took apart and from the outside looked fine. When he cut it open it was all kinds of weird I canít remember if it was willow or something else lol to me the core is just a frame for the horn and sinew. I havenít made enough to feel justified in pulling one apart to look either lol I think it would hurt my soul.
« Last Edit: March 26, 2020, 05:03:57 pm by Bryce »
Clatskanie, Oregon

Offline bownarra

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Re: Plum as core
« Reply #22 on: March 27, 2020, 12:55:30 am »
Yep, never argued any of those points. Wasnít talking about the difference between asiatic bows either. All I did was suggest non porous woods for cores. Most of the books Iíve read suggest non porous woods and the peopleís that I consider masters of the craft also suggested to me when I started to use nonporous woods. When I asked why thatís the reasons they gave me; they deal with internal friction well, and something about the way they absorb glue. Myself Iíve never had a bow fail. And the core and still be riddled with fractures and still shoot. James showed me a bow he took apart and from the outside looked fine. When he cut it open it was all kinds of weird I canít remember if it was willow or something else lol to me the core is just a frame for the horn and sinew. I havenít made enough to feel justified in pulling one apart to look either lol I think it would hurt my soul.

Ok :) By the way I wasn't arguing I was discussing :)
I know what the books say but I've done it myself :) and know that ash works without breaking as I'm sure other woods could too.

Offline BowEd

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Re: Plum as core
« Reply #23 on: March 27, 2020, 05:20:09 am »
Same here Bryce.Just stating what I've made and seen.No malice inteneded.
« Last Edit: March 27, 2020, 05:35:46 am by BowEd »
BowEd
You got to stand for something or you'll fall for anything.
Ed