Primitive Archer

Main Discussion Area => Bows => Topic started by: joachimM on December 13, 2017, 06:11:23 am

Title: Water tupelo?
Post by: joachimM on December 13, 2017, 06:11:23 am
I got some slats of water tupelo from a carpenter. Thought of using them with a backing.
Anyone ever used this wood?
Title: Re: Water tupelo?
Post by: PatM on December 13, 2017, 07:37:50 am
http://www.wood-database.com/water-tupelo/
Title: Re: Water tupelo?
Post by: Pat B on December 13, 2017, 07:42:55 am
I've never used it but it should work fine with it's interlocking grain. Just be glad you don't have to split it.  :o
Title: Re: Water tupelo?
Post by: Morgan on December 13, 2017, 06:45:02 pm
Never heard of that tree? Where is it native?
Title: Re: Water tupelo?
Post by: PatM on December 13, 2017, 06:49:37 pm
Never heard of that tree? Where is it native?

Southeast US
Title: Re: Water tupelo?
Post by: Eric Krewson on December 13, 2017, 06:52:11 pm
I found the wood to be very soft in the butt, very hard in the trunk. I carved a lot of duck decoys out of it and used the butt section. It carved easily and held the finest detail perfectly.

I haven't used it in a bow application so i don't know if it will work.
Title: Re: Water tupelo?
Post by: Stoner on December 14, 2017, 02:43:59 am
I'm right with Eric. Used it for decorative decoy's and took some great detail in feathers and under cutting. Seems like might be soft for bows, dunno? John
Title: Re: Water tupelo?
Post by: Pat B on December 14, 2017, 05:00:14 am
Water tupelo is also known as black gun
Title: Re: Water tupelo?
Post by: PatM on December 14, 2017, 05:49:30 am
Water tupelo is also known as black gun

 It shouldn't be since Black Gum is a different tree.
Title: Re: Water tupelo?
Post by: Eric Krewson on December 14, 2017, 07:46:28 am
I believe Pat M is right on this one, water Tupelo and Tupelo gum are one in the same, black gum is a different species.

Like any packrat I had a lifetime supply for Tupelo gum carving blocks squirreled away. I decided I had carved my last a year ago after being out of it since 86, I sold my stash cheap just to get someone to haul it off and get it out of my way.

Tupelo gum in the swamp;

(https://i.imgur.com/xGSqMLm.jpg)
Title: Re: Water tupelo?
Post by: PatM on December 14, 2017, 08:00:50 am
This type of tree obviously split into species adapted to all three environments.  Actual water, swamp and dry land.

PatB may be referring to the swamp variety which is known as  swamp black gum.

Title: Re: Water tupelo?
Post by: Pat B on December 14, 2017, 08:41:02 am
I was referring to Nyssa sylvatica.
Title: Re: Water tupelo?
Post by: PatM on December 14, 2017, 09:15:23 am
I was referring to Nyssa sylvatica.

 Hence the confusion. ;)
Title: Re: Water tupelo?
Post by: Pat B on December 14, 2017, 09:40:21 am
Are the wood characteristics not similar?
Title: Re: Water tupelo?
Post by: joachimM on December 14, 2017, 01:05:57 pm
You never know what it's gonna give till you make a bow out of it :-)
Black tupelo (Nyssa sylvatica) and water tupelo seem indeed very similar as per wood properties.

I'll see what destination I can give it  (--)


Title: Re: Water tupelo?
Post by: Hamish on December 15, 2017, 02:30:50 pm
I could be wrong, but I always thought Tupelo was a soft poplar like timber. If so it wouldn't be a very good choice for a bow.
Title: Re: Water tupelo?
Post by: PatM on December 15, 2017, 03:04:56 pm
It's only going to be the backing.  Maybe it  would be a good match for ERC or Cherry.
Title: Re: Water tupelo?
Post by: Eric Krewson on December 15, 2017, 03:10:57 pm
Like I said, the swelled butt is very soft, up in the trunk above the swelled butt the stuff is so hard it will smoke a bandsaw blade.