Primitive Archer

Main Discussion Area => Cave Men only "Oooga Booga" => Topic started by: Jakesnyder on July 22, 2018, 03:32:38 am

Title: Earth pigmant paints
Post by: Jakesnyder on July 22, 2018, 03:32:38 am
I live in Pennsylvania and am trying to find some earth pigmants to make for painting some bows and arrows with. What are some in this area that are what the natives used?
Title: Re: Earth pigmant paints
Post by: Jakesnyder on July 23, 2018, 01:00:36 am
I know walnut hulls and charcoal. But what about like red and turquoise?
Title: Re: Earth pigmant paints
Post by: Pat B on July 23, 2018, 05:49:55 am
Red ocher is a natural pigment.  You can get different color pigments from Crazy Crow, a PA sponsor.
Title: Re: Earth pigmant paints
Post by: Trapper Rob on July 23, 2018, 04:04:00 pm
Jake where are you from in PA?
Title: Re: Earth pigmant paints
Post by: mullet on July 23, 2018, 05:21:05 pm
Go to a feed store and get some copper and iron nitrate. The copper will make blue/turqouis, and the iron reddish brown.
Title: Re: Earth pigmant paints
Post by: Jakesnyder on July 24, 2018, 05:34:37 am
I live in johnstown,pa
Title: Re: Earth pigmant paints
Post by: Trapper Rob on July 24, 2018, 04:11:04 pm
I'm not far from you I'm in Osterburg about 20 to 30 min.
Title: Re: Earth pigmant paints
Post by: Jakesnyder on July 25, 2018, 03:53:07 pm
Did Indians ever dye things with berries?
Title: Re: Earth pigmant paints
Post by: JackCrafty on August 18, 2018, 06:00:22 pm
Yes, Amerindians of the Northeast used berries and anything else they could get their hands on to produce water-based paints and dyes.  They used insects as well.  The black willow aphid is one example and should be available to you this time of year.  It contains a purple dye that comes out when you squash the bugs.

Title: Re: Earth pigmant paints
Post by: JackCrafty on August 18, 2018, 07:22:53 pm
I looked around for info on mineral-based pigments of the Northeast woodlands but couldn't find anything other than different colored clays.  So, it looks like clay (mixed with water, plant oil, or tree sap) was the main thing used for painting wood with a color that wouldn't fade over time.  And the only thing that I could find to make the paint job waterproof is walnut oil.  Walnut oil is able to harden over time, like linseed oil.  This is a very rare trait among the various other oils available in the Northeast.

You can also mix mineral pigments with animal-based fats like duck fat and bear fat.  But these will smear and collect dirt unless you put them on in very light coats.  This means the colors will be faint and not very noticeable.  Fats are also not waterproof.

There is an art to painting with hot pitch, tar, asphaltum, and plant sugar type paints.  This might have been done in the old days but I personally think it was very rare.  I've tried this technique and it can get very messy really quick.
Title: Re: Earth pigmant paints
Post by: JEB on August 21, 2018, 04:38:53 pm
I have some rock that they used from the south west if you want some.  it is more gold color with a little red in spots. I could break some up and send some off to you if you want to give it a try.  It is tailings from an iron mine and was told by the  locals that the Natives used it for dye and other projects.
Title: Re: Earth pigmant paints
Post by: mullet on August 29, 2018, 02:32:50 am
I painted a bow red using clay that I screened all of the sand out. I just mixed it with hide glue and brushed it on.