Primitive Archer

Main Discussion Area => Muzzleloaders => Topic started by: Eric Krewson on January 20, 2019, 06:34:59 am

Title: Back to Building
Post by: Eric Krewson on January 20, 2019, 06:34:59 am
Well, the inner masochist came out in me for the last few days, I decide to resume work on a Haines flintlock rifle project. It was a kit gun I bought second hand and found it had so many flaws in the stock I didn't think I could complete it. One by one I am fixing the flaws, I think I can conceal my fixes with stain and finish where they will be invisible in the finished gun. Today it was inlet the barrel tang and fill the gaps with glued in shims. I created the small gap in the back, the stock profiler created the huge one at the front when the kit was made. My fixes will be stronger than the initial stock wood.



Title: Re: Back to Building
Post by: Parnell on January 21, 2019, 03:10:31 pm
Hmm, so just a touch of wood glue and then sand clean?
Title: Re: Back to Building
Post by: Eric Krewson on January 22, 2019, 06:26:31 am
I used unibond but was surprised it didn't stick worth a hoot. I cut new wedges and glued them in with superglue gel which kept them rock solid. Next I used a file and dremel with a sanding drum to feather the lower part of the wedge into the side of the inlet, the gaps were only at the top.  I cut off the excess wood and drawfiled the tang and the patch to get a perfect fit.

Here is a similar fix after finishing a rifle, there were wedges inserted on both sides of the tang.


Title: Re: Back to Building
Post by: Eric Krewson on June 18, 2019, 05:44:56 pm
After going in the gizmo business for St Jude and finishing dropping a bows poundage so my aging body can accommodate shooting it comfortably I am out of projects.

I decided to resume work on my Haines rifle, the lock inlet repair in a past thread took the wind out of my sails and killed my enthusiasm.

Todays work was simple but after a layoff I found I need to relearn patience. I inletted the trigger plate slightly. When I get the plate in I will add the internals and head the trigger bars toward the sear on the lock. This is the most stunning piece of wood I have ever had in my shop, it is also splintery beyond belief and very difficult to cut cleanly.

First things first;

Title: Re: Back to Building
Post by: Eric Krewson on July 03, 2019, 04:19:08 pm
The trigger plate is in, it took a while because the extra curly wood is so splintery.

I made a little gadget with a refrigerator magnet to hold my parts over the lamp to black them, it sure saves the fingers.
Title: Re: Back to Building
Post by: johnfolchetti on July 04, 2019, 08:26:22 am
That gadget looks great for holding parts like that.....not only saves the fingers but looks like it guarantees full lamp black across the part. Seems like I smudge part of it off every time I try to insert the part back into the inlet after blacking it. Great idea. Thanks for sharing that.
Title: Re: Back to Building
Post by: Eric Krewson on July 04, 2019, 10:04:28 am
I started with a magnetic auto part retrieval tool, it worked but grabbed the part much tighter and was a bit cumbersome.


Title: Re: Back to Building
Post by: Eric Krewson on July 18, 2019, 06:04:39 am
When the mushrooms and the garden comes in I seem to drop everything for food preservation.

Title: Re: Back to Building
Post by: chamookman on July 19, 2019, 01:44:09 am
Yum - Nice diversion  -C- ! Bob
Title: Re: Back to Building
Post by: Eric Krewson on August 18, 2019, 08:20:13 am
I got my trigger in, it didn't work. I measured twice and cut once but found it is 1/8" to far back. I inletted a little more and moved it up, it fires the lock set but not unset. I think it needs to go a little deeper. I found prussian blue is a much better inletting marker than lamp soot or inletting black.

The first one I put in a TN rifle worked perfectly the first time I tried it. I am going to look at its sear/trigger bar orientation today and see what is different between the two.

I have a # 7 optivisor lens with a 4" focal length, I like it for detail work but it strains my neck if I use it too much.

I decided to order a new lens with longer focal length but found each lens is $32, almost what I paid for the whole rig. I noticed the chinese knock offs on ebay for $19 shipped, they come with 4 lenses of different power, I took a chance and ordered one, mainly for the lenses. When it came in I was surprised by the quality, it is almost as good as an optivisor and the lens are just the same and will fit an optivisor.

Title: Re: Back to Building
Post by: Hawkdancer on August 18, 2019, 11:59:33 am
Handsome >:D at work under visor (lol)!  Nice build along! 
Hawkdancer
Title: Re: Back to Building
Post by: Deerhunter21 on August 18, 2019, 04:37:36 pm
I might build a muzzleloader once i get a job, but i dont know if i hace the right tools so ill just watch you for now`
Title: Re: Back to Building
Post by: Eric Krewson on August 23, 2019, 08:05:10 am
I fixed the trigger by adding a piece of metal to the trigger bar to give it more leverage. The piece looks huge but works just fine. I may make it a little shorter if I have trouble cocking my lock, the trigger is right up against the sear now.

Title: Re: Back to Building
Post by: Hawkdancer on August 23, 2019, 11:21:35 am
Deer hunter,
Bows are easier!  You just start accumulating tools one at a time, but buy the best you can afford.  Avoid cheap tools, but watch garage and estate sales.  Eric and the other gun makers can give you plenty of advise on what you need to start with.  Some of the tools cross over to both skill sets.  Learning those basic skills are also very important, as is developing patience.  Digging a hole is the only place tou can start at the top! >:D
Hawkdancer
Title: Re: Back to Building
Post by: Eric Krewson on September 13, 2019, 07:40:43 am
Tang bolt time; This always is a pain to get the hole centered on the tang, no matter how much I measure, punch and drill a pilot hole I usually get the hole off just a smidge. I did on this one as well but I am likely to be the only one that notices it.

For those who haven't done it; one drills a hole in the tang, down through the wrist and into the front of the trigger plate. Next you turn things upside down and drill with your tap drill back through the trigger plate. Then you pull the trigger plate and drill a clearance hole through the tang and wrist followed by a tap to thread the trigger plate for the tang bolt.

(https://i.imgur.com/xGQAmPK.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/lIG5Jx1.jpg)

I counter sink the tang hole and always make a chattered mess of it but it doesn't show. my barrel shifted as I countersunk the hole and I was a little off on the angle. When I tightened the tang bolt the barrel moved up a little. One has to countersink at the same angle as the tang hole is drilled or this will happen. I redid my countersinking and corrected this barrel moving problem.

(https://i.imgur.com/bsDf5Eu.jpg)



Title: Re: Back to Building
Post by: Eric Krewson on September 13, 2019, 07:51:36 am
Here is my fancy drilling jig, a field point held firmly in my vise. Once you align the drill bit and the spike you can drill a hole and have it come out exactly where you want every time.

Title: Re: Back to Building
Post by: Eric Krewson on September 13, 2019, 07:54:25 am
Like this;

Title: Re: Back to Building
Post by: chamookman on September 14, 2019, 02:27:26 am
Great tip Eric  (=) ! Thanks - Bob.
Title: Re: Back to Building
Post by: sleek on September 17, 2019, 07:27:30 pm
What are you counter sinking with? I'm always counter sinking fasteners at work and may be able to hook you up with a tool to do that job with no chatter.
Title: Re: Back to Building
Post by: Eric Krewson on September 18, 2019, 07:48:21 am
I have used them all for the most part, one flute to six, done them by hand and drill press, put cardboard under the counter sink etc. Not all get chatter but most do.
Title: Re: Back to Building
Post by: sleek on September 18, 2019, 08:10:25 am
 Have you tried one with a pilot? It's a little nub that's .002 ish smaller than the hole, and guides the cutter straight with the hole, stopping chatter. You could also drop your rpm and increase your downward pressure. That usually helps as well.
Title: Re: Back to Building
Post by: Eric Krewson on September 19, 2019, 08:32:35 am
I have some of the ones you mention but they are short. On drilling a tang hole you have to drill a long hole to the trigger plate and countersink at exactly the same angle you went through the tang with your drill bit. I have a problem taking a long bit out and putting the short one in my drill press and not having my gun shift position. I can't clamp it in the drill press vise and drill ar the right angle, the stock gets in the way.
Title: Re: Back to Building
Post by: sleek on September 19, 2019, 11:39:36 am
There are counter sinks out there that slide onto the shank of the drill bit and are set with a set screw. Everytime you drill to a certain depth, you countersink the exact same depth and angle of the drill bit every time.

I know it's a small thing, it gets covered up anyway, but just offering ideas on how to make that easier for you.
Title: Re: Back to Building
Post by: Parnell on September 19, 2019, 11:57:09 am
I'm watching, Eric.  I've just begun to pull out my next project now that the humidity will begin to lessen down here.  A Lancaster rifle in fancy maple, so similar to this project, I suppose?. I've ordered the plans from Track...should be here soon.  It's a swamped Colerain A wt. .45 42" barrel.  I've just begun to start cleaning it up.  I'll post up soon.
Title: Re: Back to Building
Post by: Eric Krewson on September 19, 2019, 06:09:39 pm
I was able to jocky the short pilot hole countersink into the tang hole and it cut a perfect countersink, no chatter.

Today's project was to teach a guy about bows and bow making, he was a no show so I worked on my gun.

I installed the barrel underlugs, drilled and pinned the stock the barrel, it went well. This is a measure 5 times and drill once kinda thing.

This was a kit gun and the previous owner had Track cut the dovetails for the underlugs. The dovetails were cut a little crooked but the underlugs supplied with the kit tapped right in with no filing.

(https://i.imgur.com/b5gKqo0.jpg)

Making the lines to line up with once I get the barrel in the stock. I have the top of barrel clamped to a straight piece of aluminum and will lower my bit and adjust the aluminum stop to where the bit hits perfectly on the lug.

(https://i.imgur.com/1mIJyRT.jpg)


I have the barrel c clamped in the stock with tang bolt tightened. I have lined up all my lines and are ready to drill the stock and underlug together.

(https://i.imgur.com/L42NUWQ.jpg)

Success, all three lugs in and pinned, I do them one at a time and pull the barrel to make sure I hit each one just right before I go to the next one. I have to make a different measurement and reclamp for each lug. The barrel is swamped and they are all in a little different position.

(https://i.imgur.com/JAKbtLo.jpg)



Title: Re: Back to Building
Post by: Deerhunter21 on September 19, 2019, 08:10:38 pm
huh. that guy missed out. hope he didnt just skip. heard horror stories about guys skipping and bows.

Im this build along is cool.
Title: Re: Back to Building
Post by: Eric Krewson on September 21, 2019, 07:45:18 am
Here is the story on the kit; I saw an ad on the Stickbow classified for a flintlock kit, $650 shipped. I contacted the guy and asked him very specific questions about the parts in the kit and where he got it. He said a guy bought the kit, kept it a long time and realized he didn't have the skills to build it. He traded the kit to the guy I bought it from for several vintage bows.

The parts were all top notch, the best out there, I knew from the description the kit was an Issac Hanes Lancaster kit from Track of the Wolf. The guy I bought it from was a gun builder and said he had more barrels and parts than he would ever use and wanted to turn the kit over for some cash. The kit also came with every drill bit and thread tap needed to complete the build and had the buttplate installed and the dovetails for the underlugs and sights already cut by Track of the Wolf. This work alone would have cost several hundred dollars.

I ran just the parts through Tracks on line order form and came out with $1100. My check was in the mail the next day, two days later the kit was on my porch.

The kit was a .50 cal, I like .54 so I had the barrel rebored and riffled to .54 and began my build. Well, my silk purse turned out to be a sow's ear with such a horribly done precarve stock that I had to glue in a bunch of patches just to make things work. I will make a good gun out of it but I was planning a show piece but won't go to all that trouble with a patched stock. The stock, although hacked up by Pecatonica during the precarve is the finest figured maple I have ever had in my shop so I can't trash it and start over.

I had planned to finish the gun for deer season last year but when I saw how bad the stock was it took the wind out of my sails and I only work on the gun when the mood strikes me. I have been having  fun working on the gun lately so I guess I will finish it in the next couple of months.

Note to self, if you ever are tempted to buy a precarve again lock yourself in a closet until the urge has passed. I have bought two, both took me more time to straighten out the stock profilers goof-ups than I would have spent building from a plank.
Title: Re: Back to Building
Post by: Eric Krewson on September 30, 2019, 06:41:24 pm
An unexpected goof-up; I drilled a pilot hole through the bolster for the lock bolt where I always drill them and found the lock bolt would be partially in the back of the barrel and breechplug. Time to patch the bad hole.

Notice the toothpick glued in the first pilot hole, it will be covered up by the side plate.

(https://i.imgur.com/qiteptj.jpg)

I drilled out my pilot hole for a 6-32 screw and tapped the hole.

(https://i.imgur.com/dWqq57C.jpg)

I countersunk the 6-32 hole.

(https://i.imgur.com/Cg37CV4.jpg)

I screwed in a screw and cut it off above the hole.

(https://i.imgur.com/2vLzRnL.jpg)
Title: Re: Back to Building
Post by: Eric Krewson on September 30, 2019, 06:49:09 pm
I peened the screw flat on the lockplate and into the countersink.

(https://i.imgur.com/pyYPF8t.jpg)

I filed and dressed the screw head, it almost disappears.

(https://i.imgur.com/gx1frj1.jpg)

I drilled a new hole in the right place and drilled the breechplug lug. You want the lug hole to be much bigger than your lock bolt so the guns recoil won't put stress on the lock plate and possibly cause a crack at the tail of the lock mortise.

(https://i.imgur.com/8c6DC5K.jpg)

Tapping the lockplate for the lock bolt, I got a perfect fit on the lock bolt this time, it screws into the lock plate easily through the clearance hole.

(https://i.imgur.com/HddxmP6.jpg)




Title: Re: Back to Building
Post by: Eric Krewson on October 27, 2019, 09:58:04 am
The tedious part of gun building, all the brass parts are rough castings. It takes a lot of filing with needle files and sanding to get rid of the casting gates as well as bringing the part to a buffed finish. This is probably my least favorite part of building a gun. This is definitely a rainy day activity when I have nothing else to do.