Primitive Archer

Main Discussion Area => Bows => Topic started by: Ricardovanleeuwen on October 24, 2021, 05:13:34 am

Title: My bowyers bench vice
Post by: Ricardovanleeuwen on October 24, 2021, 05:13:34 am
I wanted to show you all my setup for a workbench. I got this idea because i like the idea that you can sit on it for being your own contra weight for heavy wood removal, you can also stand next to it, i like the benchvise because its just really easy to clamp staves  but also almost anny other object.

For me it look like a good compromis between a shave horse and a workbench with vise
Title: Re: My bowyers bench vice
Post by: Don W on October 24, 2021, 08:43:25 am
Here is what I did


(https://s3.amazonaws.com/vs-lumberjocks.com/qnm3uej.jpg)

(https://s3.amazonaws.com/vs-lumberjocks.com/qnm47f4.jpg)
Title: Re: My bowyers bench vice
Post by: Eric Krewson on October 24, 2021, 09:59:52 am
We all settle into a stave working arrangement that works for us, space dictates most of our setups. I worked in a 5'X7' offset in the corner of the garage and out under a maple tree in the front yard starting out, I made at least 50 bows under these conditions before I moved to a location where I could build a shop.

I once removed the bark and sapwood from a bunch of osage staves with them leaned up against a large tree just to see if I could. I would work what would be the top limb first and repositioning the other end up as needed. This worked surprisingly well, the downward motion of the draw knife plus my upper body weight behind the knife would peal green bark and sapwood off like butter.

I find it interesting to see how others work their wood, I doubt if any of us are exactly the same in our setup.

Here is mine, an extra heavy work bench that won't move during heavy drawknifing, a vise and a support post to keep staves from shifting in my vise.


Title: Re: My bowyers bench vice
Post by: NonBacked on October 24, 2021, 04:54:15 pm
That's a good start Ricardo - solid, flexible, and portable. Eventually, you'll put a padded seat on it...I did.
Title: Re: My bowyers bench vice
Post by: superdav95 on October 24, 2021, 10:10:14 pm
Looks good to me.  Itís portable too.  I use an inverted tillering tree that I use for bulk removal and initial tillering before fine tuning it on main upright tillering tree.  This method work for me to get tillered fairly quickly. 
Title: Re: My bowyers bench vice
Post by: bownarra on October 25, 2021, 02:17:26 am
You just can't beat a good engineers vice with 4" jaws. Making some fittings (angle iron) so you can bolt it to the floor will really help too. My bench is extra burly and it is bolted to the floor and walls - for zero movement. I have a removable post similar to Erics.
Title: Re: My bowyers bench vice
Post by: Ricardovanleeuwen on October 25, 2021, 02:55:49 pm
I see some real smart ideas, unfortunatly i dont have the space for a big workbench. I like your idea superdave, this way you can work on your stave and check the bend without removing it
Title: Re: My bowyers bench vice
Post by: superdav95 on October 27, 2021, 06:35:52 am
Thanks.  Itís a little unorthodox but does save me time.  Itís not a hard build either.  Just a few pulleys and such.  The main thing is getting it all solid and secure.  My vice is attached to an old solid steel welders table that likley weights close to 2000 lbs.  it was quite the ordeal to get placed there.  My intent was to use it as a blacksmiths table but plans changed in that regard.  This table was perfect for my inverted tiller set up. 

Cheers

Dave