Primitive Archer

Main Discussion Area => Around the Campfire => Topic started by: bjrogg on January 22, 2022, 10:21:27 am

Title: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on January 22, 2022, 10:21:27 am
   I always felt a bit in the wrong place in the victory garden threads.


   Iím not so sure this is a good idea with the age we live in, but I decided to start a new thread. I would love to have others share their farms to.

   I enjoy others farming operations to and different crops.

  Also gardens certainly welcome.

  You might think itís single digits cold out and really nothing for a farmer to do. Itís never been that way on our farm. We always had milk cows or beef cattle.

  Anyone who has cattle knows they take care and a lot of work. That work is multiplied in with the winter weather.

   We also have a lot of equipment to maintain and sometimes completely modify.

  We changed sprayers and went from 120í wide to 135í. We want to control our traffic pattern and drive on the same tracks as we plant. It keeps compaction in same tracks, run over less crop and carries better when it gets muddy.

  We need to add two rows to our 16 row planter making it a 18 row 30Ē spacing.  45í wide. The sprayer can then drive on same tracks as planter.

  The old mechanical drives it would have been simple.

  We took off markers ( they physically made a mark in the dirt up center of next pass) as with GPS we very rarely use them. We made two frame extensions. One for each side and bolted them where the markers had been.

   The mechanics are going pretty quick. But thereís a lot of plumbing and wiring.  This is still going to take awhile.

Bjrogg

Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on January 22, 2022, 10:41:50 am
Put in a little overtime and made this to.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: White Falcon on January 22, 2022, 04:27:35 pm
Very nice.
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on January 22, 2022, 06:58:10 pm
Thanks White Falcon.

I also smoked 9 sticks of summer sausage. Got another batch to smoke yet but not sure Iíll do it tomorrow or Monday. It works pretty good doing the smoking while I work at the shop.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Trapper Rob on January 23, 2022, 08:02:08 am
BJ I know what you mean by cattle I've carried lots of hot water over the years to thaw out water fountains.
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on January 23, 2022, 10:20:24 am
BJ I know what you mean by cattle I've carried lots of hot water over the years to thaw out water fountains.

I know Rob. When we had milk cows . Between them and calves. I stayed so busy taking care of them all winter that I wondered how I got anything else done in the summer. They are easier to take care of in the summer. Putting them in pasture was always a big work saver. Of course 16 hours of daylight helps get stuff done to. They actually like the cold weather better than the hot though.

Bjrogg

PS got 10lbs of jerky Marinating for two days now. Ready to go in the dehydrator.
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Pappy on January 23, 2022, 07:56:03 pm
Got a farm BJ but don't do much farming, got the part you can row crop leased to a local farmer, he rotates Bean's and corn, I have 400 acres but most is wooded, only farm about 80 of it,use about 80 for TwinOaks and the rest I just ramble on ,the ground is just to hilly to row crop much without it washing away. My uncle told me when I got it [ it was his and in the family 80+ years at that time ]  that it was a cattle farm, of course that was before no till, all they raised was tobacco ,hay and maybe a little corn for feed, but you could do that then and make a decent living on a 5/10 acre flat spot and hills don't matter much with hay. I love seeing your operation, not many that size around here, there are some a little father north in the edge of KY and some west Tennessee where the ground is flat just not much in Middle/east Tn. in the hill and hollows. I will be keeping and eye on you though, seems you have plenty to do. ;)
 Pappy
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on January 24, 2022, 10:34:00 am
I really want to visit your farm someday Pappy. Iíve been to Clarksville to see my retired Army buddy. Nice area.

We have gotten lots of cattle over the year from farms just like your uncle talks about. From Tennessee, Kentucky or Virginia. They come in how we like em. Tall, lean and tough. They usually adapt pretty well to our farm and we put some finish on them. Fatten up pretty good.

I would love to see a old tobacco operation.


Well put another 8 sticks in the smoker.

The jerky is done.

Back to the shop to work o planter. Pulled off all the old fertilizer hose. Itís 17 years old and itís really in the way for routing wires. I donít think I will reuse it but might have to see how hard it is to get. A lot of stuff getting very hard to get. Making things very uncertain and impossible to plan and receive products ahead like we normally do.

I think my next step is going to be taking off old wiring and replacing with new as I go. This is the scariest part. Lots of wires and it wonít be wired the same. We previously had two variable rate hydraulic motors with shaft speed counters. They each ran half the planter 8 rows. Now we will have three v-rate motors and they will each run 6 rows. That will be nicer for my swat control. It will turn on and off in 6 row sections instead of 9. That will save me more seed and not double plant angled headlands and edges.

I would really have liked to totally upgrade to modern individual row electric drives and individual row shut off control, but right now it is impossible to get the new equipment. Iím recycling old equipment that others have discard when they updated to the new technology.


Your welcome to visit anytime Pappy. Itís nice here by the big lake in the summer most summers. Can get a bit humid.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Hawkdancer on January 25, 2022, 02:12:07 am
Well, those put my 18 supplement tub garden to shame!  we got a fair amount of tarragon, some squash, zucchs, and tomatoes, enough blueberries to top off a dish of ice cream, and a heck of a water bill!  Anasazi beans didn't make at all. Did get the composter filled, been too dry to work, though!  Try again this year!  Sort of mini farming! (lol)
Hawkdancer
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: GlisGlis on January 25, 2022, 10:34:25 am
following you BJ  (-P
by the way great obsidian arrow. So nice that it deserve to fly toward a deer  :OK
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on January 25, 2022, 11:11:29 am
Thanks Jerry. Iím very interested in your raised beds. Really thinking I should start some of my own. Past few years have been using my dadís. He wonít be using them anymore. They are certainly more knee and back friendly and you can still grow a lot of produce in a small area.

Thanks Glis.
Iím glad to know someone is watching. Not sure how popular this might be, but I like trying to bring the land back to people if I canít bring the people back to the land.

Since seems to be a little interest hereís another project we are working on.

Now that we switched to a 18 row planter our 4 row beet digger wonít be right. 4 isnít devisable into 18 evenly. I canít dig rows planted from two different passes of the planter. The rows need to be spaced perfectly.

Now I can use a 6 row beet digger. It will take three passes of six rows for each pass of 18 with the planter.

We used to have 4 passes of 4 rows for 16 row planter. So hopefully this will help with beet harvest.

Lots of beet growers around here have switched to the new self propelled harvesters and the old pull type can be bought for scrap price. Of course thatís about what they are worth because the wear and tear parts are expensive and many.

We got this 6 row pull type machine and are reconditioning it. We are going to rob some parts off our old four row. Tank, ferries wheel and elevator will be swapped. Putting in several new grab rolls and all new bearings. All new digger wheels. By the time where done we will have 6x what we paid for it, but thatís pretty normal.

Thanks for watching. Please feel free to add your farm or garden

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on January 25, 2022, 11:13:44 am
By the way. Smoked summer sausage turned out great and so did the jerky.

Wish you could smell and taste it

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Will B on January 25, 2022, 11:52:28 am
That looks delicious!  My mouth is watering :OK
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on January 25, 2022, 12:41:15 pm
That looks delicious!  My mouth is watering :OK


Hereís a sample of jerky for you
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Trapper Rob on January 25, 2022, 05:57:17 pm
Looks good BJ
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on January 26, 2022, 08:53:23 am
Thanks Rob. Still praying for your dads wife. Hope all goes well. Now you better go out and make sure the water troughs arenít frozen.

I took all the hoppers and meters off planter. They are in the way for removing old wires and rerouting new ones. I switched the meters over to Sugar beets. I will take them to our Precision dealer and he will run them on his test stand to make sure they are working properly. We do this every winter. It can save a lot of costly problems.

I have the planter to the point Iím going to need to hook a tractor to it and unfold it. Itís single digits out and the planter tractor is on spreader for Biosolids. Ten miles from shop. In the cold. Itís probably going to take all day, but I need to change tracks on my old sprayer tractor. I need to take off narrow 18Ē wide tracks and switch to 24Ē wide tracks. Then put that tractor on Biosolids spreader. Then put planter tractor on planter.

Probably not that exciting and a lot of playing around in the cold. Hopefully tomorrow will be ready to actually work at planter again.

Bjrogg

Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Parnell on January 26, 2022, 11:25:30 am
This is a fun thread, Brian!  Keep it up.
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Marc St Louis on January 26, 2022, 01:56:48 pm
looks good Brian

Used to like making smoked jerky, haven't done that in awhile
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on January 27, 2022, 12:49:07 pm
Thanks Steve if people are interested I will try to keep you all updated and continue this thread.

Marc I gave some jerky and a couple sticks of summer sausage to my brother. He said the jerky was pretty addictive and hard to ration.

Ironically at the times it seems like Iím not posting or doing anything. I might just be to busy to post but I will try to.

We got a good ways on our projects. My brother got the tractors switched and I continued pulling off the old wiring harnessís. Iím far enough along now to see how the new harness is going to work. I also realize I need one more yet so got that ordered today.

I have two of the four harnessís run. Will have to make a couple extensions wires for the two vacuum meters.

I have the three variable rate hydraulic motors and shaft speed counters wired.

The rate controller, seed star box and 2020 monitor are all wired.

I have the harness for the individual rows monitor laid out but not run yet.

I think Iím past the scariest part.

Got hydraulic lines run for third v-rate hydraulic motor.

Iím cautiously optimistic at this point but I know there could still be lots of surprises and Iím a long way from field ready.

Getting closer though and still have a little time.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on January 27, 2022, 12:54:53 pm
And I finished up a nice Cherokee two fletch target arrow last night.

Iím really liking the two fletch. Donít know why I didnít try it a long time ago. Pretty simple to fletch, looks great and this is the quietest arrow I have ever shot. Seems pretty fast two.

River cane shaft, pole barn spike point.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: chamookman on January 28, 2022, 04:17:01 am
Really enjoying this thread BJ ! The work is never done. Bob
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: BowEd on January 28, 2022, 06:47:48 am
Good thread about farming BJ.It goes to show to the public that farming is'nt just putting seed in the ground and watching it grow.
There are no classes of jobs out there.Everyone is acquainted with the least meaning full job all the way to the most meaningful job.
You wear a lot of different coats farming.Appreciating each others skills to get to the final goal.
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on January 28, 2022, 07:33:04 pm
Thanks Bob. Itís never even close to all done and I guess for some silly reason I kinda like it. Just seems to make you feel like you have a purpose.

Yup Ed been learning the Jack of all Trades skills almost all my life.

Fix it with some baler twine to finish the job. Then take everything apart and fix it right when you can. When I was young you could see mechanically how something worked. About the time I graduated high school computers where just becoming available. Now you have to imagine how something works. Some of it is pretty hard to imagine, but it works. The technology in agriculture is absolutely amazing and essential. One has to remember the planter Iím working on nowís technology is twenty years old.
The new one will blow your mind. Each row driven by its own electric variable rate motor. It knows exactly where it is on the planter and exactly where the planter is. If itís on the outside of a 90í wide planter on the inside of a turn it knows itís traveling slower than the row on the outside of the turn so it slows itís self down to plant the right population. The one on the outside knows it has to speed itself up.


Well Iím pretty happy with our progress. I think I have all the harness we have installed. Iím going to have to wait for the last one awhile. Hopefully not to long. I think itís all going to work, but Iím certain there will be surprises . I want to find them as soon as I can.

Iím sure I will have lots of other things to do before that harness gets here.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on January 28, 2022, 07:56:56 pm
Put in a little overtime and straightened a river cane shaft. Wrapped both ends with sinew
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: BowEd on January 30, 2022, 03:38:04 am
It goes to show people there is'nt nothing a person can't do if they are willing to do it and have the patience to follow through.
Attention to details trait carries through to practically all things being made.
If it's done enough times a person can remember for the future and not have to go through the getting acquainted part again.
The purpose part to me is saving money as the cost of labor is out of this world.
A friend showed me the remnants of 2 whole deer he made into beef jerky.You could put the contents of 2 deer into a small Wal Mart shopping bag.
Nice shaft but I usually wrap the arrow shafts after self nock is cut/finished and arrowhead is mounted.To avoid any cutting of the threads.

Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on January 30, 2022, 10:57:03 am
So true Ed. Often times the scariest part is just getting started. Once you commit and tear it apart, weíll then you have to stick with it and get it done.

I didnít do much with the planter yesterday. I decided to do something with that river cane shaft. If your curious itís posted in the arrow section. Obsidian point, two fletch build.

I think it might be headed somewhere special.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: M2A on January 31, 2022, 09:04:08 am
Good thread Bj. Ill be following along.

Thats some big equipment. 

Maybe come April when things get moving around here I'd have something to add. Ought to get started planting Peppers and Toms in the greenhouse in about a month.
Mike     
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on January 31, 2022, 06:22:13 pm
Thanks Mike. Look forward to seeing what you grow. I think thatís a big reason I do this. I just love watching it all grow. Harvest is alway sad but sweet.

Actually some of the neighbors have much bigger and better equipment. A couple have planters three times as wide. We get along pretty good with this size though.

I had to take my wife to the eye specialist today and my daughter to the ear specialist. Took all day but at least good reports.

I think I have a meeting in the morning and some banking to do.

Have more Biosolids coming Wednesday and snow on the way.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on February 02, 2022, 10:51:14 am
Well yesterday was spent getting ready for the big snow storm weíre supposed to get today, along with getting ready for more Biosolids due to arrive today.

This morning is one of my good friends funeral. Iíve talked about Gary before. Even had pictures of him in a article I wrote for primitive archery magazine.

Gary was a true inspiration. He was in a farm accident 16 years ago and has been in a wheelchair ever since. I have always been so impressed with his attitude. He wasnít one to feel sorry for himself and definitely made lemonade when all he got was lemons.

Before Garyís accident he loved hunting and walking. He walked several miles every day and hunted every chance he got. He even went to Africa and talked about it a lot.

After his accident he worked hard at getting any movement back he could. He couldnít even ďsqueeze ď his trigger finger. He had to move his whole hand to pull his trigger.

His kids modified his wheelchair and mounted his rifle on it. The whole family went back to Africa and enjoyed another hunt there. Gary took a couple really dumb ones as he said. They had to be dumb for him to get them. Kinda like me hunting with my stick.

My buddy Randy was a fantastic friend of Garyís. The two of them spent countless hours hunting groundhogs and trying to lower the population for the local farmers. They averaged over 200 a year with Gary shooting most of them. Iím really going to miss him. He wonít be forgotten. Every time I see a ground hog I will certainly be reminded of him. Itís pretty fitting that his funeral will be on ground hog day.

Heís out of his chair and got his wings now. RIP Gary.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on February 02, 2022, 02:36:28 pm
My friend Gary has a lot of hunting trophies. None of them meant as much to him as this one.
Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Deerhunter21 on February 02, 2022, 03:05:02 pm
Im enjoying this thread BJ! thanks for posting  ;D
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Stoker on February 05, 2022, 03:46:16 pm
Interesting thread Bj. I get to play farmer every once and while on my son-in-law's family farm. Mostly helping putting grain in the bins. The boys know what is up in the fields. Used to help pick rocks in the old days, till technology put me out of business with that new fangled rock picker. Greatest invention ever
Thanks for taking us along for the ride
Leroy
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on February 06, 2022, 08:57:41 am
Thanks Russell. Iím glad you are enjoying it.

Thanks Stoker. We have extended family that we very much appreciate help from every fall. It takes a lot more warm bodies than just my brother, nephew and I come beet harvest.

I did a lot of rock picking, hoeing weedy Sugar beets, baling hay and straw, milking cows and pitching manure. Along with a bunch of other glamorous jobs. Often wonder how so many from my generation grew up loving the farm and doing whatever they could to stay on it. Yet now with many of those glamorous jobs no longer required or at least made simpler, many of our youth are leaving the farm. Itís still a tough, but rewarding job.

Iím sorry I havenít updated thread much this week. Itís been a busy one even if it doesnít seem like I got much done. Between doctors, a funeral, snow storm, agronomy meeting, and Biosolids I canít believe itís already Sunday.

I did very little on our planter. Still waiting for one more wiring harness to hook everything up to the tractor. Hopefully it comes this week.

We had some nasty weather, but really it wasnít as bad as predicted. Was actually really pretty until the wind picked up. Then most of the snow in my field ended up in big snow banks in my yard.

I got tractor switched on Biosolids spreader but it wouldnít work. I had to replumb  hydraulics and return oil to a different spot on the tractor. Got that done and everything was working good. Got snow cleaned out of my yard and two truck loads delivered and dumped. I was hoping to quick spread them, but on the first spreader load I broke the apron chain. Fortunately I was able to get the spreader empty. I took it the 9 miles back to the shop and my nephew and I went right to work removing the broken section of chain and replacing it with new. Itís not a fun job, but we got it done in record time.
I took spreader back to my farm and started spreading the Biosolids. It actually went really good. The wind had blown all but a couple inches of snow off the field and now it died down to calm. Perfect for my job. I spread all but one spreader load yesterday. Could have finished, but went to 7:00 mass. Should be able to finish the last spreader load pretty quick if I donít have any other problems. It wonít be today though.

I havenít had time for any projects. All my overtime has been work related this week. Maybe today. I donít have anything planned so far and it really feels good that way.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on February 06, 2022, 09:01:23 am
Snow before the wind

Bunny tracks in my barn.

Just a little snow really helps see how your spreader pattern is.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: chamookman on February 07, 2022, 04:59:23 am
Got a bit more Snow here just West of Flint - bout 12" on the flat, finnaly got plowed out day before yesterday. Helped Wirwicki with a tractor mounted Snow Blower in His shop today. Like the posts for sure. Bob
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on February 07, 2022, 10:06:46 am
Yes we were right on the edge of system. Weíve been getting pretty lucky so far this winter. Most of the big snow has stayed south of us. Lots of cold which I donít mind if it sunny and no wind. I donít like the wind. Donít mind moving some snow, but hate when the wind just blows it right back again.

Weíre starting to run out of parts we need to finish up our projects. Still have things to do, but really hoping some of the stuff weíre waiting on shows up soon.

Got the Biosolids spread for now. Going to move stuff back to shop. My snowblower tractor has a problem with clutch linkage. Get that in shop to look at to.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Buckeye Guy on February 07, 2022, 02:00:19 pm
Just discovered this
Good Idea BJ
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Marc St Louis on February 07, 2022, 06:51:33 pm
Yes we were right on the edge of system. Weíve been getting pretty lucky so far this winter. Most of the big snow has stayed south of us. Lots of cold which I donít mind if it sunny and no wind. I donít like the wind. Donít mind moving some snow, but hate when the wind just blows it right back again.

Weíre starting to run out of parts we need to finish up our projects. Still have things to do, but really hoping some of the stuff weíre waiting on shows up soon.

Got the Biosolids spread for now. Going to move stuff back to shop. My snowblower tractor has a problem with clutch linkage. Get that in shop to look at to.

Bjrogg

I don't know about down your way but up here if there's not enough snow cover then the ground freezes and if it freezes too deep then that just sets back gardens.  So far this year snow cover has been a bit on the low side.
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on February 07, 2022, 08:26:18 pm
Glad you found it Guy. Good to see you here.

Marc. Around here we say to cold to snow. It always seems like we get more snow when it is on the warm side. When it gets really cold the air gets drier. But the snow we do get stays.

We like it to freeze before we get snow so the fields arenít mud under the snow. The frost does take some compaction out of the soil to. It can certainly make for a late spring though.

I really like 20-25f. Sunny and no wind.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Marc St Louis on February 08, 2022, 09:05:57 am
Up here the coldest nights are always on a full moon and it almost never snows on a full moon.  I like winter but we've had many nights in the -30's and that I am not fond of anymore.  Also I have found that a good snow cover actually helps with heating our house
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on February 08, 2022, 10:32:43 am
Yup thatís a lot colder than we get around here. Normally donít get much below-14f . Hate when you breath through your nose and it freezes together. The big lake tends to moderate our temperature extremes. In the summer it helps keep it from getting as hot. In the winter it keeps us from getting as cold. It definitely is a big influence on our weather and even more so right along the shoreline. My dads farm where I grew up is four miles from the lake. My farm goes almost up to it. I always have extra clothes. Sometimes itís hard to believe the difference those couple miles make.

Snow is very good insulator. Especially dry fluffy snow. If we get a foot of snow before freeze up and it doesnít go away. There will be mud under the snow no matter how cold it gets.

Bjrogg

Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on February 08, 2022, 02:17:27 pm
We got loader and my snowblower tractor back to shop yesterday.

Snowblower tractor has broken clutch cable. Had to take access cover off bottom of cab floor to work on it. Took awhile but got old one out. Hopefully they get new one soon. Or at least I donít need my snowblower.

Also got our new used six row topper home. It was nice that we could buy it pretty local. The lady said she might even come and run it for me if we really got in a bind. Hard finding enough good help that time of year.

Got lights wired on beet digger. Put tank and convoy from four row on six row. It has new chain and the electric hydraulic valves that allow  me to fold elevator, run conveyor to unload the bin and change direction of elevator to fill cart or to fill bin. I can do all of these functions and more using one hydraulic outlet from my tractor with the value. Otherwise it would take more outlets than my tractor has. I need
the rest of my outlets for other functions.

I did hit a piece of obsidian for a while Sunday. Not done, but starting to look like something

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on February 09, 2022, 07:12:06 pm
We had two four row beet toppers. The topper removes the beet leaves and places them in between the rows. We donít harvest them . They just go back into the ground.

Now we need a six row topper and again we got one about scrap price.

We plan on using a lot of parts from our four rows. They have almost new flails and a much better bracket to hold them.

We took them off the topper we bought. They were worn out anyway. And we hate these brackets.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on February 09, 2022, 07:13:30 pm
These are the ones on our four rows.
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on February 09, 2022, 07:16:46 pm
It also got above freezing and we finished washing our combine. We need to keep working on equipment. Canít just sit and wait for parts.

Also have more Biosolids coming.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on February 09, 2022, 07:20:50 pm
I did a little work on a Osage I had started last year. Itís a beautiful stave that Arvin sent me.

I found out one thing. Iím not in as good of shape as I was last winter. I had a struggle getting it strung.

Good to have a bow in the vice again.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Parnell on February 11, 2022, 09:23:48 am
Hi Brian,

Was listening to episode 20 of the Bear Grease podcast about soil health and itís affects and effects, etc.  itís a good one.  But, Iíve found that all the episodes are great.  Anyhow, it made me think of this thread and your lifestyle.

Be curious to hear about what types of approaches you are interested in and practice regarding soil management and what that encompasses up in Michigan.

Cheers,

Parnell
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Pat B on February 11, 2022, 10:55:22 am
Looks like farming ain't just planting seeds. You have to be a jack of all trades and hardly get paid for most of it.
My hat is off to all farmers.  :OK
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on February 11, 2022, 03:25:30 pm
Yes there certainly is Pat. I wear so many hats that it never gets boring.

Steve I hope you follow along and I think you we see my ideas about soil health. Iím big on it and just like a personís health it isnít just one thing that keeps it healthy. Itís a lot of little things.

Just like people soils are different to. Some are more healthy to start with and some take more maintenance.

I could do a whole thread on the subject.

A few things Iím big on.

Cover crops. A crop we grow besides our actual crop. Sometimes before, sometimes after, sometimes both and sometimes even during. We do it to hold soil in place. Slow erosion. Build organic mater. And improve soil structure.

Controlling traffic patterns.
Helps keep compaction to confined areas. We also use track tractors and carts instead of wheels to have a lighter footprint. We try very hard to avoid driving or tilling our ground when itís wet and more able to pack. Kinda like a snowball. If snow is cold and ďdryĒ you canít pack it. It just crumbles. Same with dirt. If it wet it can be made into a mud ball.

Tile and drainage.
I donít think anything we have done in my lifetime has helped our soil health more than under ground drainage tile. I really allows us to do all the other things we need to do to have soil health. It helps keep the plants from drowning like the holes in the bottom of a potted plant. Maybe not as good but it sure helps. It make it possible most years to plant, harvest and till the ground when itís not to wet. When it is to wet it usually at least allows us to harvest the crop.

Nutrition.
Just like peopleís health the soil depends on it to. We have to feed the soil and the microbes living in it. We feed it with cover crops, manure, Biosolids and conventional fertilizers. Right now we are applying Class A Biosolids. It is a highly refined product made from human waste. Itís not the most convenient product Iíve ever used, but it works and both my soil, crops and cover crops seem to really like it. Kinda like Matt Damon on the Martian but not nearly as stinky or messy.

Thereís a bunch of other things that go along with the program, but I think if you keep watching youíll pick up a bunch of them.

Was going to say what weíve been doing, but running out of time now. Iíll save it for another time.

Thanks for the questions and comments

Bjrogg

Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Marc St Louis on February 14, 2022, 09:08:36 am
Coldest night this winter.

(https://i.imgur.com/W2ASDdd.jpg)

It was cold but 30 years ago this would have been an average cold night, back then it was common to have temps at least 10 degrees colder
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Pat B on February 14, 2022, 10:06:35 am
That temp is 30 degs colder than out 20deg(F) here this morning.
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on February 14, 2022, 10:59:10 am
Yup itís a bit nippy out there last night Marc. But you definitely have us beat. Thatís okay with me though. Iím not sure how low we got but it was -4f before I went to bed last night. Was sure glad my wife had extra blankets on and half the bed warmed up.lol I was like a reptile attracted to the heat.

Yeah definitely remember some cold winters , but it creeps into my bones more now.

The cold weather has been good for our spreading Biosolids operation. A lot of the Biosolids from Detroit go across the bridge to our good Canadian neighbors. When the boarder closes we are suddenly moved up in the schedule and we received 8 doubles loads of product late last week. Went right to work spreading it with good conditions. Still have about two loads to spread, but we got a heck of a pile spread. Was actually good timing for us.

We did get the last wiring harness for the planter and I think I have the planter side of it installed correctly. Need to route it to the front of planter now and then to tractor. Sounds simple, but you have to realize that this planter folds up for transport. It uses that space very efficiently and doesnít provide a lot of extra space to route wire harnessís and hydraulic hoses. We are hoping not to have to route harness as it was originally installed. Iím afraid it wonít fit with the connectors on unless we pull all the hydraulic hose out, install wire harness and then reinstall hydraulic hoses. We are hoping to run a PVC pipe over top of the brace that the original wires and hoses were routed through, but now we arenít so sure it going to work. Weíll figure something out though.


Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on February 14, 2022, 01:33:38 pm
Still spreading
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Parnell on February 15, 2022, 08:59:47 am
Good pictures!  I see the track setup on your tractor.  Iím appreciating the work put into the management of the soil more than ever, learning more about it.  Itís a fascinating subject and I can imagine being very passionate in itís stewardship.

You can bet Iíll be watching.
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Marc St Louis on February 15, 2022, 09:07:43 am
Yes that is a pretty good setup.  Tracks certainly seem the way to go

I remember when I was young my grandmother getting her wheel tractor stuck in the mud, it was not a pretty sight
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on February 15, 2022, 09:36:49 pm
There are advantages and disadvantages to both wheels and tracks. I like tracks for most jobs I do. They have a much lighter footprint. They are more expensive to maintain though.

Well after fixing a water problem at home I worked at the planter again. I took the planter outside and folded it in and out. I wanted to see if our plans would work.

The first picture is planter folded out. The wires and hose originally were routed inside the braces that run from front to back at 45degree angles. Itís the only way to route them as this length wonít change. The center framework telescopes so its length changes that doesnít work for running wires and hoses.
Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on February 15, 2022, 09:40:51 pm
Next picture is showing how center frame is telescoping out, becoming longer and folding the outsides of the planter inward

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on February 15, 2022, 09:44:37 pm
Thought I had picture of it folded completely but must have deleted it.

Next picture is showing our conduit temporarily mounted on the 45 degree braces

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on February 15, 2022, 09:47:51 pm
And hereís the part we were worried about. The ď hooksĒ That come around and hook over the center frame to lift everything up are squishing our conduit ever so slightly. I think it will work.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on February 15, 2022, 09:58:43 pm
I finished running the wire harness to the front of planter and hook it up to tractor.

Now I have to reprogram all my planter information. I setup both the rate controller and planter display so they now have 3 vrd motors instead of two and assign them their proper rows.

Iím having trouble though. My display isnít seeing my individual rows information. Iím not sure what the answer to my problem is but itís not going to get fixed tonight. Iím kinda hoping I just need to have the seed star box reprogrammed. Might have to get someone from Deere to do that. Hopefully I can get some answers tomorrow.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on February 16, 2022, 11:43:00 am
Well now Iím getting somewhere. Turns out I had everything hooked up right but I didnít realize that the new harness for the individual rows electric eyes was wired for Deere now instead of Dickey John like it use to be. Dickey John switches the positive and negative their plugs. I had to remove the old adapter harnessís.

I powered everything up and it showed the rows. I also reprogrammed my precession display for 18 rows.

I then had everything except row 13 eye info. A few more calls to one of my buddies and a bunch of trouble shooting and I determined one of the new harness's has a open circuit.

The maker of the harness is going to call me.

Iím getting closer though and feeling much better than last night

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on February 18, 2022, 07:23:50 am
I was hoping that the company that made the wire harness would just send me a new one and I would send the defective one back.

Thatís not how they wanted to do it though. They wanted me to do some more trouble shooting. I had already determined which harness was defective. Now they wanted me to remove the pins from the plugs to see if they had a simple problem with their crimp or a broken wire by the crimp. I have a tool to remove the pins and I pulled pin 13 out of one end and inspected it. It visually looked good. I still had open circuit between pins. I checked from pin to probing the wire just a inch or so from the crimped on pin. I had continuity there so that tells me the pin is crimped on properly.

Next I remove pin from plug on other end of harness. Once again I visually inspect it and it looks good. I check resistance between pins and circuit is still open. I check from pin to probing the wire a inch from the crimp and have continuity. Once again this is telling me the crimp is good. As unlikely as it seems, my new wire most have a break in it .

The technician Iím working with talks to his boss and they decide they want me to send this harness back so they can repair it and then send it back to me. Iím a little bummed as this is liking to take weeks. Iím really wanting to try everything out and see what other surprises I have. The harness is twice as long as I need. Iím very tempted to just cut it in half. See which half has good wire and wire plug on good half, but they donít want me to do that.

They decide to have Ups pick up my package. It sits in my shop another 24 hours waiting to get picked up.

In the meantime we work on the combine, but we are running out of new part and itís becoming a real problem getting them. Lots of stuff back ordered. Starting to get pretty nervous. We have most of our fertilizer on farm already in our storage tanks. Usually we have a lot of our chemicals on farm in in our storage to but this year we havenít been able to get any yet. In fact they still havenít been able to tell us what we will be able to get and have told us several things we wonít be able to get. Normally we have prepaid the majority of these inputs already. At this point we still canít because of this.

After everyone else goes home I decide to work on a project. Our ups guy quite often comes about 7:00 or 8:00 pm. The first night he doesnít show, but last night he did. He always likes seeing what Iím working on.

Itís a river cane shaft Iím straightening for a obsidian point I just finished. Guess I donít have a picture of the shaft, but hereís the point. I like this shape for arrows

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: chamookman on February 19, 2022, 03:33:28 am
Great looking Point BJ ! Hope to be able to Finally meet You at the New location Memorial Weekend. I spend alot of time with that Bruce B. character  (lol) ! Bob
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on February 19, 2022, 08:14:36 am
Thanks Bob I really like Bruce and Cindy. They are really good people and made Susie and I feel right at home right from the first event we attended. We keep in contact. They even dropped by our shop a few years ago and dropped off two bear hides they decided to clean out of their freezer. I tanned one, but I havenít found the time to tan the second one yet. That was a lot more work than I thought it would be. Iíll get the second one  someday, but I can see itís not going to be this winter.

Bjrogg

Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on February 19, 2022, 08:45:55 am
I was hoping to test all my systems out and find anymore surprises, but now I have to wait for the defective harness to be fixed and returned.

This is how our row starter fertilizer was applied. We never liked this system. Itís supposed to put the fertilizer 2Ē to the side of seed and 2Ē below the seed. It doesnít do a very good job of that. And weíve tried tweaking it, but still werenít satisfied.

Several years ago we tried mounting a knife behind one row like the second picture. It worked good, but the bracket we made was to light and bent. I could sure see that one row got off to a lot better start though.

We were going to try something on one row again, but since we have run out of parts we decided to go for broke and put them on all 18 rows while we wait for parts.

Hopefully they work. A lot of stuff happens in this 6 feet. Row cleaners  clear trash and residue out of the path. Then the starter fertilizer is placed 2Ē to the side and two inches below where the seed will be planted. Then the meter drops the seed in seed trench made by two seed disks. The depth of the trench is controlled by the gauge wheels. Then some nylon plastic ďseed formersĒ gently push the seed to bottom of trench and make sure seed has good soil contact. Then we spray  a 3 1/2 inch ďTee bandĒ
that goes in the trench and a inch to each side of it . We can use a very small amount of insecticide to protect our seeds from grubs, wire worms and seed corn maggots. We can cut our rate by 10x using the narrow Tee band. One problem with cover crops is that they are also a very good environment for harmful insects. Finally the closing wheels close the seed trench and light pack the ground to insure good seed to soil contact and consistent depth.

Bjrogg

PS I sure hope this is going to work. Iím a little nervous about switching them all without trying them out on one row first. We plant in a lot of different conditions and those conditions can have a huge effect on how something like this works
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on February 19, 2022, 08:50:21 am
I also got that point haft to a river cane shaft

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: GlisGlis on February 22, 2022, 04:28:09 am
Nice point. It deserve to fly  (SH)
did you use foreshaft or direct connection to rivercane?
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on February 24, 2022, 06:03:36 am
Sorry itís been awhile. Glis glis. It is mounted directly to the river cane. Has  wild turkey tail feathers with a two fletch. Itís i. The arrow section . I called it pass thru.


Right now itís cold again and Iím spreading Biosolids.  Bouncing across field 2 mph in the dark

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on February 24, 2022, 08:08:27 am
Three hours later and the sun is coming up. I could see about thirty just as the sun was breaking.
Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Marc St Louis on February 24, 2022, 09:18:53 am
Sorry itís been awhile. Glis glis. It is mounted directly to the river cane. Has  wild turkey tail feathers with a two fletch. Itís i. The arrow section . I called it pass thru.


Right now itís cold again and Iím spreading Biosolids.  Bouncing across field 2 mph in the dark

Bjrogg

Any particular reason why you are doing that in the dark?
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on February 24, 2022, 10:35:49 am
 A couple Marc.

1 my schedule. Have a meeting this afternoon and tomorrow I have my great aunt funeral.

2 I like having the ground frozen enough I donít even leave a track.

3 going to take a few days and have to do it while conditions allow.

With the gps itís not a problem.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Buckskinner on February 24, 2022, 11:13:00 am
I grew up on a beef/hog operation but decided not to peruse it later in life, but still live on part of the property. My brother was born to be a farmer and not room for both of us anyway.  He gave it a go for about 20 years but could not find enough land to make it work.  Now he just hobby farms about 90 acres and I rent mine to the neighbors.  He's the last of 8 generations to farm the area, but who knows what his kids will do in future.

That is quite a conversion!  I remember my Dad back in the 70's converted a 4 to a 6 row corn planter, obviously that was nothing complicated as everything was mechanical and pretty simple.  These days with the electronics alone makes that a major undertaking.  I don't know a thing about raising sugar beet, but my brother put in radishes for cover crop last fall and the deer sure love them!  Actually I ate a pile of them as well, I'd pull one on my way to deer stand and munch on it.  Also they were great cooked!
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on February 25, 2022, 08:28:11 am
Buckskinner I totally understand you and your brothers situation.

We grew up milking cows, making hay and hoeing weedy sugar beets. My dad was very good at letting us make mistakes and learning from them. Itís something Iím probably not as good at and mistakes have become very expensive.

My dad said we could always come back to the farm, but we had to leave it first and try something else. My dad was a smart man with a lot of common sense. I went to electronics school and after I worked in Detroit for several years. In the spring of 1984 the economy was terrible. Inflation was crazy and the place I worked at was going to have to let someone go. It was me or a guy with a wife and kids. I decided to pack up my meager belongings and go back to the farm.

It was difficult. Interest rates were high. Everything was expensive and when I left the farm they sold the cows. My next youngest brother had taken a job and work off the farm for a few years. Now he was getting married and wanted to come back to the farm. We decided to buy some cows and start milking again. I remember being very nervous about how much money I had to borrow and how high the interest rate was. My dad told me if you donít have anything, they canít take anything away from you. That was 38 years ago and I have been I debt ever since. It has been a struggle and the time I spent off the farm made me appreciate my time on the farm enough to stick with it. I have had to sell stuff I couldnít make the payments on. It hurt and my brother who farmed with me for 35 years decided it was time for him to leave the farm again. We had to sell land and there wasnít enough left for all of us.
Myself and my middle brother decided to keep trying to make it go. The next couple years were very difficult and very hard on one nerves. We somehow managed to survive them. I said a lot of prayers and asked the good lord to take care of us. Honestly he was the only one who could. He has and we are getting through it.


My dad planted our first sugar beet crop two days before I was born. This spring if my planter works I will plant our 61st crop of sugar beets. Things have certainly changed. Yet stayed the same. We still take those delicate little beets seeds and plant them in the cold moist soil. We still do a lot of praying and worrying.

Last year we had a record year for sugar beet yields. We averaged 44 tons per acre. A whole 10 tons higher than the fantastic crop we grew the year prior. Unfortunately the sugar content was very low. We averaged 16.4% sugar. The year prior we averaged 20.23% sugar. The previous year even though we had over 3,000 less tons. We had over 300,000 more lbs of sugar from them. This still wouldnít be so terrible except beet are a perishable crop. We canít just store them in a bin. They go on huge piles and we have to get them processed before the end of spring.

The most we have ever processed as a coop is 5.1 million tons. Last year we estimated we had a 5.8 million ton crop. We left 5% of our crop unharvested, knowing we would never be able to process it. Also knowing we probably should have left another 5 or 7 percent unharvested.

We harvested them though. Hoping for a record slice and hoping the factories could get them processed. We are still very short on employees at our factories with 80 open positions. Covid has made it difficult to keep the ones we have able to come to work with exposures and quarantine.
Instead of having record slice it has been pretty disappointing.  Now we are paying to haul beets away and dispose of them. I expect us to discard around a million tons of beets between what we didnít harvest and what we haul back from the piles. And the amount of sugar we get from the tons we do process is low. Normally we get between 290 to 320 lbs of sugar from a ton. We are averaging 239 lbs.
Kinda like when you have to much zucchini and canít find a home for it, but a lot more expensive.

We will do it again though and chances are with different results. Hardly ever have the same results two years in a row.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Buckskinner on February 25, 2022, 10:36:17 am
Most who don't grow up on a farm don't realize the cutting edge that farms run on, literally year to year where a lot of them you are just trying to pay for inputs and interest.  We also had extremely lean years where Dad wouldn't talk about it, but you could see it in his face every day.   I wouldn't have traded my childhood for anything, I learned 100x more working on the farm than I did in college, and the farm was the reason I got my first job which laid the foundation for my entire career.  My to be first boss saw on my resume that I grew up on a farm, asked me some questions only a farm kid would know and offered me the job on the spot.

I try to instill the same for my kids and even though they helped the neighbor milk and my brother put up hay and such, it's not the same as the grind of every day.  I do think they have a work ethic and can appreciate a hard day's work.  I remember a day about 8 years ago when their baseball practice was cancelled because it was too hot out and they spent the afternoon unloading hay, that's farm life though...

I learned a lot about the beet business just from your above post!  I wish you a prosperous growing season and with high sugar content and efficient processing!
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on February 26, 2022, 04:19:48 pm
Stick around and you will learn a lot more about the sugar beets. They are pretty interesting crop to grow.

I got up at 3:00 am Thursday and applied Biosolids till 1:30pm. Then got cleaned up and went to a meeting from 3:00 pm till almost 8:00

Slept in a bit Friday and went to my aunts funeral. She was only a couple weeks from 97. Lived a good life and raised 13 kids. It was really good to see so many of my cousins again. Itís to bad someone always seems to have to pass for so many of us to.

I visited with my cousins till about 3:00 pm and then went back at applying Biosolids till 10:30pm

My wire harness came back. It did have a broken wire. My nephew installed it last night but couldnít get the hydraulic motors to turn. This morning I looked everything over and tried it. I got the motors to turn but the one we added was turning wrong direction. Iím hoping I can plumb it differently to change its direction. Iíll have to talk to Deere Monday.

This afternoon I got the bow I started last winter back out and did a little scraping. I got this stave from Arvin. Thanks Arvin Iím sorry itís taking me so long, but hopefully I can get it to the flats someday. September is a really busy time for me though.

It has a little reflex right out of the right fade. Makes it look a little worse than it is. I think I need a little more right outer third. Kinda like left limb so far. Iím not going to rush this one. Itís about 50@21
right now. It seems to have gained a little weight just sitting in my shop.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: M2A on February 28, 2022, 08:46:10 am
Bow looks good so far. Been trying to keep up on your thread here.

Just found out late last week that the crew we use for pruning will not be coming this year. Spent a few hours late last week with the pole saw. I'll be out all this week to try and get some big stuff cut out of the apples. Labor seems to be an issue no matter what you do. Looks like the ground will be frozen in the mornings but going to be in the mud after that. Going to be a long few weeks, Im getting too old for this stuff :)

Mike
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on February 28, 2022, 09:01:36 pm
Yes labor sure does seem to be everyoneís problem Mike. Good luck with your apples.

Had a little birthday party for my daughter yesterday. Was fun seeing the grandkids to.

This morning I started spreading Biosolids and then my brother traded me off. I went to FSA office and reported my cover crops and planting dates. Then I had some tax stuff to do. Then I headed back to the shop.

My nephew replumbed  the variable rate hydraulic motor we added to the planter and we tested it out. It worked. Everything is turning that supposed to be turning. In the direction and speed their supposed to be turning. I think itís all going to work now. Thatís a great feeling. We still have to plumb all the new hoses for the fertilizer system. Install the meters on the hoppers and test them on the planter, but Iím thinking they should work and hopefully I donít run into any problems.

Then my son asked if I could help him clean the cattle pins. I spread three loads of manure and then the loader tractor had a leaking tire. We managed to drive it to the air compressor and then to town and the tire shop. It was closed but at least itís there and there wonít be a service call.

I have to get my propane tank tested tomorrow before I can get it refilled. Sure hope it passes. Iím down to 10% and itís still pretty cold.

Then Iím hoping to work on planter again.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on March 01, 2022, 04:20:04 pm
Well my tank passed inspection and so did everything else.

As often happens my day went quite differently than I was planning.

It was a nice day . Temp somewhere in the high 30ís to maybe even 40 with hardly any wind. I washed my sonís combine. I had it blown off with the leaf blower already but it has been to cold to get it washed. My old arms are sore from running the power washer. My brother lifted me up with the loader and we got it pretty darn good. Somebody else can wax it.

In like a lamb out like a lion. Guess weíll find out, but it is March now and anything can happen around here.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: chamookman on March 02, 2022, 03:58:31 am
Nice  :OK ! Bob
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Buckskinner on March 02, 2022, 10:44:02 am
Combine looks like well taken care of for being in its teen years!  I bet you could probably sell now for more than you bought it for, although about $400k to replace new...  How much grain do you run compared to beets?
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on March 02, 2022, 12:40:28 pm
Yes we are shop people. Itís been passed through generations. We maintain our equipment the best we can. Much of it is very seasonal and when you need it to work, you need it to work. Next week isnít going to be good enough. Down time is very expensive when you have a crop to bring in.

Hereís our 1985 Kenworth. My favorite of our trucks. We have a 1991 Mac and a 1995 Mac. Our newest truck is 2005 IH

Iím working on the planter again today and hoping to actually put some seed in it and test it out. That might be a little optimistic though.

Buckskinner we really arenít that big for our neighborhood. We were up to about 2,200 acres before we sold land and my brother got out. Since then we have also had landlords pass and the next generation sold . We werenít in a position to buy.

We planted more grain when we had more cattle and land.

Now we plant around 440 acres of beets. 470 acres of white wheat. 70 acres of corn. 50 acres of soybeans mostly on sugar beet fields headlands and wedge rows. 10 acres of rye for cover crop seed. About 500 acres of edible beans.

My son has about 200 head of cattle and farms about 300 acres. We work together planting and harvesting. He grows about 40 acres white wheat. 40 acres of edible beans. 30 acres of hay and the rest is corn

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on March 02, 2022, 12:43:20 pm
1985 Kenworth
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: chamookman on March 03, 2022, 04:33:51 am
What Transmission is in the K Whopper ? I drove Big Trucks for a living - Bob.
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on March 03, 2022, 07:31:00 am
A Eaton 13 speed Bob. She spent the first part of her life fueling planes at Metro airport. 400 hp Cat 3406. Sheís a nice truck. I use to transfer sugar beets from the piling grounds to the factories. Ran doubles. Before her I had a IH cab over with a 400 Cumins.  I couldnít believe how much nicer this KW rode. She only had about 70,000 miles when we bought her. Spend a lot of time pumping fuel though.

I didnít actually put seed in the planter, but I think I have everything ready to give it a try. I put the meters on the hoppers and put the hoppers on the planter. I removed the rest of old wiring harness we donít need and I tidied up and secured to the harnessís, hoses and air lines trying to make sure they were safe for folding and unfolding and also operations. Then it was time to get to Ash Wednesday mass.

Iím pretty sure itís going to work now, but I really want to run some seed through her to see if all the systems work.

I have a couple meetings this morning. Still hoping to try her out today if possible, but I get my plans changed all the time so wonít know till it happens.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Marc St Louis on March 03, 2022, 09:14:58 am
Yes March and -24C last night and +9C with rain on Sunday.  Weather like a Yo-Yo.

I can remember 30 years ago getting weeks of -40C to -45C in Feb. and having to get up to go feed the cows.  That was a bit brutal.  Don't miss those days
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on March 03, 2022, 02:25:56 pm
Yes definitely yo-yo weather. I really donít care for our spring weather. Normally itís cold, damp and muddy. With a lot of icing wind right off the big lake. My back is getting stiff and sore just thinking about it.

Well I got done with our meetings and tried the planter. 2/3rds of it seemed to be working but one of our existing motors wasnít turning. Iím hoping it just needs some calibration or a button push but nobody I can talk to now.

Looks like some more trouble shooting

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on March 04, 2022, 09:31:48 pm
I got my planter working. The seed star needed to calibrate its third drive position. I was thinking I could do this by running one of the system test designed to work with planter in up position but I couldnít. I actually had to put it down and drive about 200í. The ground is a mix of mud and frozen. I had to remove the fertilizer knives we just put on or they would probably have gotten damaged. Then I put the planter down turn everything on and drove. The third motor speed up and slowed down several times until it ran its calibration and then it ran at the proper speed.

The monitor was seeing each rows seed drop and counting population. I didnít want to run the planter through the mud and frozen gravel any more than I had to. I did the rest of the test I could with planter in up position. Seems like itís going to work.

Next I have to get the other systems working. My Air Force system uses air bags to either put more or less down pressure on the planter units to insure the seed disks can cut into the dirt properly. I tried the test for the Air Force system but it failed . I found a couple leaks I fixed and one of the air bags that came with the used rows units we added had a leak . I went to my precision dealer and got two new ones. Didnít get them replaced yet, but hopefully tomorrow and hopefully it passes the tests then.


Itís sure a good feeling to have the planter and monitor working. I still have to put the new hoses on the fertilizer system.

Also have to put my spray pump, tanks and controller.

It should be just my normal familiar problems now. Hopefully not to many of them either.

Bjrogg

Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on March 06, 2022, 08:30:36 am
Starting to look a little more like spring.

Got air bags changed and air leaks fixed.

Next step is fertilizer system.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on March 09, 2022, 12:22:35 pm
Been working at plumbing the new fertilizer hoses. I changed the 1 1/2Ē from the tank to the pump. Then I changed the 1Ē one from pump to manifold. Now Iím running individual rows to the new redball monitor. This is for one half of the planter. There are two of these. There will be 18 hoses going to each of them when Iím done. 9 from the manifold to red ball monitor. And 9 from monitor to each row.

Coming along nicely.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on March 09, 2022, 12:27:29 pm
Put in a couple night overtime and did this.

Snapped my perform a couple nights ago.

Then I changed course and came up with this

We got our snow back, but the days are getting longer. Eventually it will thaw out.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Deerhunter21 on March 09, 2022, 03:26:28 pm
I gotta say BJ, you are getting Dang good at knapping! your arrows look great like always but the knapped heads with the art on the shaft makes your arrows look amazing!
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on March 09, 2022, 09:15:23 pm
Thank You Russell. I really appreciate that.

I just got home from a meeting.

We started this project 7 years ago. Itís a project that records our farmís metrics. It grades us on things like carbon footprint, land use, environmental quality, water quality and stuff like that.

Itís been pretty interesting and our metrics are actually very good. Iím really not all that into the carbon footprint as much as I am the rest of the stuff, but the things we do to improve those metrics also improve our carbon footprint.

Itís a bit sad though. Weíve been doing these things for several years now. We did them at our expense. We had to learn all the lessons the hard way. Figure out what works for our farm and what doesnít.

Now thereís new programs trying to encourage the methods we use. One would think we should have those same incentives, but we donít qualify because we are already doing them.

Iím glad they are trying to get more operations to try these methods. I believe they are good for the soil, wildlife and environment. However itís not fair providing my competition with a financial incentive for trying something I have been doing for years and not giving me the same incentive.

Thatís the problem with so many programs. They really donít have to make a whole lot of sense.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Buckskinner on March 10, 2022, 09:42:51 am
Planter is looking good!

We've lost frost in the ground here so I'm guessing tilling will start soon, not much put in the ground around here until about mid-April to avoid freezing temps.  Beets earlier? What is germination typical germination period?
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on March 10, 2022, 11:11:54 am
Planter is looking good!

We've lost frost in the ground here so I'm guessing tilling will start soon, not much put in the ground around here until about mid-April to avoid freezing temps.  Beets earlier? What is germination typical germination period?


Yes beets are sometimes even planted early March around here.

We have to get most of the frost out of the ground, but we plant around some snow piles once in awhile along edges and by woods.

We need to get the ground dry enough though. Sometimes that happens early spring. Often we get a window before the rainy weather.

We have a lot of underground drainage tile.

Sugar beets are pretty cold hardy. They can take temps down to about 20 in the right growing stages. If they are just poking through the surface it can be hard on them.

They are actually easier to get a good stand planting early ahead of the spring rains than later when itís getting drier and after our spring rains. We canít plant them very deep, so it can be hard to keep them in the moisture to germinate.

We like to have them planted by my birthday April 16.

Bjrogg

I donít think we will get any in March this year. Still pretty cold here and a lot of frost in the ground. Hopefully by my birthday
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on March 11, 2022, 10:55:50 am
My son is gone to State FFA Convention and Iím feeding his cattle.

They are happy to see me.

Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on March 11, 2022, 11:13:35 am
Itís supposed to be turning warmer next week. We lost almost all of our snow yesterday and it froze good overnight. We decided to try and get as many acres of clover cover crop seed spread as we can today.

We have a gator and we can put our GPS on it. We also have a small spreader. Takes a lot of passes across the field but we can drive about 18 mph. With the gps we have a coverage map and acre counter. Also lines we drive by.

We are going to hit it pretty hard. Got up early and a few inches of fresh snow with more falling. We decided to keep going.

We do it like NASCAR one guy just drives. And another has bag open and dumps seed in.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on March 11, 2022, 02:20:28 pm
We did pretty good. Got 130 acres spread before the snow got warmer and started melting. That makes it drip water off the sides of spreader and it plugs the holes the seed comes out the bottom.

We had to quit and vacuum the seed back out of the spreader to clean the wet stuff on the bottom.

Sounds like itís going to be to windy tomorrow. At least we got a start. About 25% done.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: M2A on March 12, 2022, 07:57:46 am
18 mph! that's getting at it!

Frost was all out of the ground here and yesterday it was 55 degrees, This morning we got about 5 inches of snow and its still coming down.
Mike   
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on March 12, 2022, 09:27:31 pm
It is Mike. When we first started doing this we drove about 8 mph. We had trouble with the holes the seed flows through plunging a lot. We realized if we opened up the holes more they wouldnít plug up as easily and we drove faster to put the right amount on. We do a pretty good job spreading it now. We put about 8 lbs a acre. Like everything else itís getting more expensive. Seed price has doubled.


We got together and ground, mixed, stuffed and smoked 370lbs of pork sausage. Tradition.

This stuff is yummy

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on March 12, 2022, 09:30:21 pm
Everybody gets some
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on March 14, 2022, 04:29:33 pm
Got the pork sausage vacuum packed and put away yesterday.

Got up early this morning and spread clover. It went really good.

I had almost 60 acres before the sun peaked out.
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on March 14, 2022, 04:35:30 pm
Hard to tell where the sky begins and the water ends. This is why we call it the sunrise side.

The sun didnít stay out for long though. Which was good for my job. I went from 3:00am to 3:00 pm. Itís getting to sloppy now. I did finish 3 farms and about 205 acres.

I hope I can get the rest soon, but it sounds like it could take awhile. Nothing below freezing in the forecast this week

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on March 14, 2022, 04:38:02 pm
The Canadian Geese love grazing on my winter white wheat. There will literally be thousands of them here.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Pappy on March 15, 2022, 08:48:12 am
Looks like you are having a busy winter. ;)
 Pappy
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Buckskinner on March 15, 2022, 09:49:52 am
The Canadian Geese love grazing on my winter white wheat. There will literally be thousands of them here.

Bjrogg

Free fertilizer!
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on March 15, 2022, 11:56:59 am
Yes Pappy. Usually things slow down a little during the winter, but we still always have a long list of jobs that need doing. It is a never ending list that is very adaptive. Whatís a priority in the morning when I get up could be pushed to the side for something more urgent that suddenly pops up.

Itís looking like my busy schedule is going to get even busier. My brother had his colonoscopies and he didnít pass. Very early in the information process but it sounds like itís treatable. Heís going to need more test. And treatments. Heís my right hand. Itís really going to be hard for both of us. I pray he does well.

Yes Buckskinner. They sure do make a lot of it. I almost stopped and took a picture of it.  My youngest son works at a park and they are swarmed by them. They get lots of complaints from the campers about the ďfertilizerĒ.  In the past they could chase them away with the gator, but they canít anymore. They have to get a harassment permit to do that now.

Today Iím back in the shop. Had some logistical office work to do and I think Iím going to get back at the fertilizer on the planter. The parts I needed to finish the fertilizer system up came now. Gotta stay at something on the list.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on March 17, 2022, 08:25:21 am
Waiting for a truck. Sun just coming up and full moon going down . Didnít get a picture of the moon before it disappeared into the clouds.

Oh thereís my truck

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on March 17, 2022, 08:31:32 am
Truck
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Pappy on March 17, 2022, 08:49:37 am
Hope all goes well with him.
 Pappy
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: M2A on March 17, 2022, 09:03:53 am
Great looking sunrise Bj. Will be keeping your brother in my prayers.

Cant cover ground like you can. Got about 6 acres done and a little less to go cutting out the big stuff. Working at it at as often as I can, as well as some others who are doing the fine work. Had to head up with the brush hog and grind up the mess I made to make it easier for them to get through. Prunners are powered by compressed air so the hoses get caught up in everything.
 (https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/51942507282_6a8caf116a_w.jpg) (https://www.flickr.com/gp/158435722@N02/CGe4S1)IMG_4514 (https://www.flickr.com/gp/158435722@N02/CGe4S1) by Mike Allridge (https://www.flickr.com/photos/158435722@N02/), on Flickr
(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/51943576033_18a7556ab6_w.jpg) (https://www.flickr.com/gp/158435722@N02/5PQ712)IMG_4513 (https://www.flickr.com/gp/158435722@N02/5PQ712) by Mike Allridge (https://www.flickr.com/photos/158435722@N02/), on Flickr
Had a special project going the last few years and figured I had better cash out now before it interferes with production. A few apple staves I have been watching for the last few years. Sealed the ends but don't have the time to do much to them now. Picture makes them look a little nicer than they are but they are not bad, hope to get a bow or 2 out of them.  Hope in 2 weeks things will be a little slower and i'll be able to get back to my shop.
(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/51943813794_ee6b119d3f_w.jpg) (https://www.flickr.com/gp/158435722@N02/38R89g)IMG_4512 (https://www.flickr.com/gp/158435722@N02/38R89g) by Mike Allridge (https://www.flickr.com/photos/158435722@N02/), on Flickr         
       
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on March 17, 2022, 09:19:20 am
Thanks Pappy and Mike. He is like my right hand. We work really good together.

Everyone worries about the test. Heck the test is nothing. The prep is uncomfortable but You can take it. Iím hoping that the test just saved my brothers life, but itís to early to say that.

Hopefully we can work through a whole lot more of these sunrises

Thanks for sharing the pictures of your orchard Mike. I have about 3 1/2 acres of lawn. I have often thought about putting a orchard there. I probably have enough work already though.

Please anyone farming or anything related feel free to contribute to this thread. Gotta be some more out there

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on March 21, 2022, 09:00:35 am
Had a very nice weekend even if I had a cold. I didnít get a lot of work done. I had a few more trucks to unload and I tried not to get to close to my brother and nephew so I didnít give them my cold. I went home early Saturday and I slept good. Went to bed at 8:00pm and didnít get up till almost 8:00 am Sunday. I was feeling a quite a bit better. My sister and brother in law were supposed to come visit at 1:00 pm. I warned them I had a cold. They said they were just getting over one so they still wanted to visit.

It was really nice seeing them again. Their son has been living in Albania going on two years now. They just got back from visiting him and it was really interesting hearing the stories of their adventures. I think they both feel more comfortable with their son being so far away living in a foreign land. They meet a lot of very nice and interesting people. Even another young couple who came from our state.

I made a arrow and stand I gave as a a Christmas Present. We put all the presents on a table. Draw names and you can open a present. Then you can either keep or trade it. My arrow was very popular and my brother in law really wanted it. He never got a chance to get it though.

I made another arrow. I text my brother in law pictures of the entire process. From straightening a river cane shaft and hafting a obsidian point. To painting my Bjrogg markings and wrapping my two fletch wild turkey tail feathers on with sinew. Then I made a display stand from driftwood.

All the while I was making this arrow I was planning on giving it to him. He wanted me to give him details about the arrow I made for Christmas. His brother works with Steve From ďMeat EaterĒ and he shared pictures of my Christmas Arrow with him. I donít always name my arrows, but recently I have named a few. This one I decided to name ďMeat EaterĒ .

Dave was thrilled with the arrow I gave him. My sister was to. She asked him what he was going to do with it. I told him he could do whatever he wanted to with it. He could keep it, sell it , or give it away. It was his to do whatever he wanted.

He said he wasnít going to sell it for sure. He said he was going to put it on his fireplace mantel until his brother came to visit. Then he was going to give it to him to take to Steve. Thatís pretty awesome feeling for both of us. I hope Steve likes it. I really enjoy watching his show.

After they left I went to our beach. Most of the ice is melted. The lake is a little lower again this year. Thatís a good thing. Two years ago it was so high people were losing their houses. Now it back to where it was about six years ago. Except it washed away all the brush and phragmites and left a sandy beach. Itís just amazing how much this beach is constantly changing.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on March 21, 2022, 09:13:25 am
This part of the lake is very shallow and was all phragmites when we first got it. The high water washed them away. Iím pretty sure they will be coming back now
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: chamookman on March 22, 2022, 03:57:29 am
Wow - didn't realize the water was down that much. F=Really enjoying Your posts - Bob.
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on March 22, 2022, 11:29:45 am
So glad you are enjoying the thread Bob. Sometimes I think itís probably not real smart to be sharing as much here as I am. I tend to trust people more than I should sometimes, but I do appreciate the chance to show a part of modern agriculture that is often misunderstood. I also feel blessed to be able to care for this land and enjoy sharing that blessing with others.

The lake shoreline is always changing. The change is fascinating. I should look back through my pictures from several years ago and see if I can show that change.

Yesterday was just one of those days.  I still was feeling a bit sluggish from my cold and had a headache. As soon as I got to work I was greeted with the job of pulling the pump out of the well and changing it. Honestly it went pretty good. It was warm and sunny and everything came apart good without damaging anything. We already had a pump and we got it installed by noon.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on March 22, 2022, 11:37:56 am
Then we had another fun job. The State requires us to cover our Biosolids with plastic if we have to store for longer than 21 days. I donít think we are going to be able to spread these by then. Frost is coming out of ground and it way to soft in the field to drive on with tractor and spreader. Iím hoping not to store it for much longer than that but Iím think probably more like 30 days. This site and covered like this we are permitted 90 days. Iím sure it will be spread way before then.
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on March 22, 2022, 11:40:47 am
I put in a little overtime and finished up a arrow and stand. Itís hill cane with obsidian point. Two fletch. Itís a pretty arrow and I am hoping to get it in the mail to someone special soon.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: WhistlingBadger on March 22, 2022, 01:37:18 pm
Great pictures, BJ.  Hope all is well with your brother (and that reminds me, I'm about due for one of those fun tests, too).  It always kind of makes me laugh when people aren't allowed to "harass" the geese.  It's never good when we forget that we're the ones in charge...
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on March 30, 2022, 08:07:52 am
Sorry itís been so long since I updated. Been busy.

Thanks WB. I hope your test goes well.

We found out we have a water line leaking under ground, under our shop. Thats never a good thing to find out. We have a plan but for now we just turned water off to shop.

Between water problems and wet basements it seemed hard to get anything else done. But we did get parts for combines. We put new feeder house chain on my sons and wear strips on both. New clean grain elevator sprockets, bearings and chain on my sons. New straw chopper floor on ours.

Still a bunch more to do on both, but the temp dropped down to high of 25 low of 14 for a couple nights.

I went on swing shift and started spreading Biosolids again. The first night I started at 3:00am and conditions were perfect. The ground was frozen enough that I didnít leave a track. I had a 11 mile round trip with my tractor to get from the pile to the field. Then another two miles in the field spreading. I was going to have to drive pretty hard to spread this stuff before it thawed again.

I first morning I watched one of the planets rise. Iím not good with them but I think Jupiter. Then about 35 minutes later Just a sliver of the moon rose. Next the sun but the first morning it never came out shining bright. It got cloudy and kept the sun partly hidden most of the morning. By 2:00 pm even though temp was still 24 the sun was melting the top layer of ground and I started leaving tracks.

I went home ate, cleaned up and went back to bed till 11:00 pm. Then I got up and went back at it. The second morning I got to watch Jupiter, a sliver of the moon and a beautiful sunrise all within about a hour of each other. Kinda makes the swing shift worth it. I was glad I started as early as I did. By 10:30 I was starting to leave tracks but I had the field done.

The rest of the pile was supposed to go on a worked field and although I donít like making tracks, I kept going till I finished the pile. Was good feeling to have that job taken care of. I put over 300 miles on my tractor in two days. Or nights. Plus loaded 33 spreader loads. I slept good last night.

Another of my old timer friends passed. His funeral is this morning. Dang really getting to dislike this. Lost three really good friends in four months. Going to miss them all.

Iím getting ready for winter to be over . I could see lot of tile runs showing up yesterday afternoon. The ground dries over the tile runs first leaving ďwhiteĒ dry ground over the tile. Darker wet ground in between.  Usually if the weather cooperates another two weeks and the fields are ready. Itís freezing rain now though.

Hope you are all well

Bjrogg

Wish the picture was better. Jupiter risen with sliver of the moon right behind and sun just starting to brighten up the clouds
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Pappy on March 30, 2022, 08:46:00 am
Beautiful picture BJ. :)
 Pappy
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on March 30, 2022, 03:17:50 pm
Beautiful picture BJ. :)
 Pappy


Thanks Pappy, but the picture doesnít do it justice. Somethings are just a lot better in person.

I really do enjoy a beautiful sunrise and a hot cup of coffee.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Buckskinner on March 30, 2022, 09:04:16 pm
Ah the anticipation for spring is something on the farm...  Gonna get real busy for you soon!  Kinda miss those days although I really don't miss relying on the weather.   Last years near drought around here was hard on the remaining farmers around here.  Luckily there were some timely tenths that fell and salvaged the crop.   

Prayers for your brother and your loss of friends.
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: M2A on March 31, 2022, 09:17:48 am
Nice pic of the night sky BJ. Always liked astronomy and know very little but still is fun to watch the planets move around. Cant wait for the james webb to start sending pictures back to nasa.

Rain here for now but should be clearing up soon. Need to work on some limb loppers in the shop anyway. I see the light at the end of the pruning job but its still a ways out there. They ought to be sticking the 1st corn in the ground soon. I use to be part of that but haven't in a few years now. The idea is to be picking for the 4th of July. Sweet corn brings the people to the market.
Mike     
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on March 31, 2022, 01:15:31 pm
Ah the anticipation for spring is something on the farm...  Gonna get real busy for you soon!  Kinda miss those days although I really don't miss relying on the weather.   Last years near drought around here was hard on the remaining farmers around here.  Luckily there were some timely tenths that fell and salvaged the crop.   

Prayers for your brother and your loss of friends.


It really is indescribable Scott.

Usually by the end of harvest you are pretty well done in. Then you spend the whole winter getting ready for next year. Thereís always more to do than you can get done.

The final push comes and priorities change. Fertilizer tanker. Small engines and pumps, field cultivator, seed and a whole bunch more that have to be ready.

You test everything as best you can and undoubtedly the first 5 acres are spent fine tuning everything. And nothing works the way itís supposed to. After about 10 acres we usually have everything clicking.

And then thereís the weather. Doubt ours is much more forgiving than yours. We try to stack things in our favor with underground drainage, but that only goes so far.

We want to be ready to really get stuff done when the conditions are right.

Thanks so much everyone for the prayers. I believe in them. They are much appreciated.

Bjrogg

Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on March 31, 2022, 01:36:22 pm
Nice pic of the night sky BJ. Always liked astronomy and know very little but still is fun to watch the planets move around. Cant wait for the james webb to start sending pictures back to nasa.

Rain here for now but should be clearing up soon. Need to work on some limb loppers in the shop anyway. I see the light at the end of the pruning job but its still a ways out there. They ought to be sticking the 1st corn in the ground soon. I use to be part of that but haven't in a few years now. The idea is to be picking for the 4th of July. Sweet corn brings the people to the market.
Mike     

The night sky is something I wish I knew more about. It is fascinating. When you get away from the light pollution it is amazing how many stars you can see. One can certainly see how entertaining and important the night sky was to people of the past.

I grew up in the space age. I remember landing on the moon and how amazing that was. How many advancements in technology since then. I really look forward to us going back. Unmanned flight has taken us so many places. I know taking a human along complicates things exponentially. Cost, payload, fuel, oxygen, life support etc.  It really does make it more romantic. Especially if we actually do stuff there.

Look forward to seeing your orchard blossoming. And following itís seasons.

We plant a pretty good sized patch of sweet corn. The kids use to sell it, but now we usually just give it away to friends and family. We freeze a lot. I canít eat the stuff from store in a can. They totally ruin it.

Thanks again for the prayers

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: M2A on April 02, 2022, 08:33:40 am
Yeah, that canned stuff I never found very good. We put up a bunch of corn each year. Well worth it. We grow about 65 acres now, about half of what we did 20 years ago, but its almost all sold in the farm market store and not sent to town for wholesale anymore.

Going to be a few weeks for the apples to come into bloom. After about a month of sawing out the large branches with a pole saw I only have a few more trees to go until Ill call it good and wanted to finish up yesterday. Had it all planned out to be done early, nice easy day. However, the ground was just dry enough to plant corn and the guys I work with really wanted to have the weekend off. So on my way to the orchard I stopped by to see how well they were getting along and with the wind they were having a tough time of things, so I helped them out for a bit. While I was there I got a call that some roof vents in some greenhouses were not closing in our retail area so had to run down to the market override the computer controlled system down there before the roof got damaged and bounced back and forth the rest of the day. What was to be a short day turned out to be a long one, but 1st acre of corn is in for the year and I'll be in my shop today heat treating a a piece of locust for a special build for my younger boy.
Mike
(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/51977363320_3fa8367560_w.jpg) (https://www.flickr.com/gp/158435722@N02/53584z)IMG_4524 (2) (https://www.flickr.com/gp/158435722@N02/53584z) by Mike Allridge (https://www.flickr.com/photos/158435722@N02/), on Flickr
(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/51976801516_cd291c7b04_w.jpg) (https://www.flickr.com/gp/158435722@N02/FL5V58)IMG_4526 (https://www.flickr.com/gp/158435722@N02/FL5V58) by Mike Allridge (https://www.flickr.com/photos/158435722@N02/), on Flickr                 

     
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on April 02, 2022, 01:01:38 pm
Thanks for sharing Mike.

Wow. 65 acres is a lot of sweet corn.  I probably have 1/65th of a acres and I get tired of picking it before its done.

Looks like you use plastic for weed control?

How wide of spacing between your rows? Do you leave it wide for picking? Do you pick by hand? Guessing you plant several planting dates to spread out harvest?

Really enjoy talking farming or agriculture anything with growing plants or animals.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Stoker on April 02, 2022, 01:19:20 pm
Went to the son-in-law's farm last weekend for my grandson's 3rd birthday. They are ready to go, just waiting on the weather to warm up a bit. A little drier than they'd like but welcome to the Canadian prairies in the spring.
Thanks Leroy
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: M2A on April 03, 2022, 09:22:38 am
I bet thats some pretty country up there Stoker. I've been lucky enough to get invited to South Dakota a few times to pheasant hunt, vast country up there, I suppose its somewhat similar further north.

Its photo degradable "mulch" and used to heat the ground, Like a greenhouse. On a sunny day it can bring soil temp up 30 degrees or so. Otherwise the ground would be too cold here for another month. Not sure this picture will show it well but it was 37 degrees and cloudy that day but condensation was building under the plastic because of the temperature difference.
(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/51976801726_aee24b7b30_w.jpg) (https://www.flickr.com/gp/158435722@N02/b70o78)IMG_4525 (https://www.flickr.com/gp/158435722@N02/b70o78) by Mike Allridge (https://www.flickr.com/photos/158435722@N02/), on Flickr
Its a labor intensive process, There are 2 rows of corn under each row of mulch. We use plates in the seed boxes instead of a vacume system, so they will drop 3-4 seeds at a time then be thinned to 2 stalks per hole later. Definite higher yield than "bare" ground corn at 36" row spacing but  a lot of work and more risk. But for the next month this is how its planted. Mulch is spaced 6 foot on center if the guy in the seat can keep it that tight. Nothing flat or straight here lol.
Planting will continue until mid/end June with anything from 68 to 85 day seed depending on the conditions. The goal is to keep the market supplied from july 4th till labor day with no holes in the supply or without too much coming in at the same time. Sweet corn is what brings the customers in the door for us all summer.
Years ago they bought a Pix-all picker but that only lasted a few years and didn't have a big enough head for plantings like this. So its all picked by hand. That was my job 7 days a week for years. I don't do that type of work anymore for the most part. But if that's what needs done its what you do. I spend more of my time in the orchards than I do planting anything these days.
Mike
                     
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on April 03, 2022, 11:45:38 am
Thanks for sharing Mike.

Really enjoy learning about others operations. Iím sure you keep yourself and your helpers busy.

I noticed it didnít look like a lot of flat land there.

I hope you are blessed with a bountiful harvest with good weather.

Please keep sharing.

Stoker hope your grandson had a great birthday. And hope your son in law has a safe and prosperous year. How far north are they? What crops do they grow? Are they to far north for corn? Do they grow small grains and canola?

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Stoker on April 04, 2022, 10:14:48 am
Bjrogg they are about 120 miles north of the US border and in line with the east side of Montana.
They mostly grow Duram wheat and lentils. All dryland.
Thanks leroy
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on April 04, 2022, 01:22:32 pm
I wish them the best Leroy. If Iím not mistaken they were pretty dry last year.

We are nothing like last year. Still cold and snowing here. Had about  3Ē yesterday morning but itís mostly melted again. Last spring was warm and dry at this time. There were a lot of sugar beets planted by now. Nothing yet this year. Still okay yet though.

I wanted a plan B for the fertilizer knife setup. I think they will work ok with new colters but with partially worn ones Iím afraid they might be to deep and not close enough to the colter. Iím afraid that rocks and residue might make problems.

I decided to drill another set of holes to use with worn colters. It would have been easier to drill in drill press before they were welded on. Oh well Iíll get them. 10 rows done 8 more to go.

Have to drill through 3/4Ē thick steel . 18 holes 1/2Ē in diameter. That drilling through 13.5Ē of steel. Working in very uncomfortable position.

I like the fit though. And it could save me a lot of time during planting season.

Bjrogg

Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on April 04, 2022, 01:39:17 pm
We also got the water routed into the shop again. Sure will be nice to have water again.

We are all kinda independent thinkers around here. We spent part of a day arguing the best way to do it. When we were all done arguing we used a combination of best ways to do it and came up with a plan.

It went really good other than still some pretty deep frost on the north side of shop in the shade. Dig hard in places.

Our plan was to find water line underground on north side of shop. We didnít want to cut cement in new part of shop floor because it has in floor heat. We wanted to come up into old shop floor.

I got thinking. When we built the original shop we put in a solar wall my dad designed. The south wall of shop had a solar wall. Just a double wall painted black inside with glass panels over it. When the temperature would get to 70 it would turn on a fan and blow the air through drainage tile surrounded by field stone under the floor. When we put on the addition we eliminated the solar wall. But the tile was still there.

All we had to do was dig under the shop enough to find a tile. Then we ran line right into shop without even have to cut a hole in the cement. Worked like a charm. Love it when a plan comes together

Bjrogg


Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on April 15, 2022, 12:14:08 pm
Well we have been busy getting everything ready.

I tested every system on the planter now. Hopefully it all works when I actually take it to the field. I donít think we will get any beets planted by my birthday. The 16th. Itís drying pretty good now though. Getting really close. If itís still dry Monday I think we should be able to go. They are talking snow Monday though. Wouldnít be the first time I planted in snow flurries. We always say to have really good beets they need to get snowed on after you plant them and again before you harvest them. Usually the winning combination for good sugar % and good tons.

We have all of ours and my sons clover cover crops seeded into our winter wheat crop. About 565 acres. Thinking it should be having some decent weather to germinate. Hopefully we get a good ďcatchĒ as the seed has more than doubled in price.

We have fertilizer truck ready. Tractor and field cultivator ready. Our micro nutrients ready for mixing.

We got a bunch more stuff fixed on the two combines but they still need more.

We continue to try to get as many of our inputs on farm as we can. Seems like thatís been par for the course the past few years with Covid and the supply chain issues from shutdowns. This year has actually been the worst of the three springs . I think we should be able to make what we have work. Wasnít really plan A, but at least we physically have stuff for plan B.

Itís Good Friday and lots going on this weekend, Iíll try to keep updates. Happy Easter everyone

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on April 17, 2022, 10:18:19 am
Didnít get any beets planted by my birthday, but did have a good one.

Our Harbor Beach Community Theatre has been struggling for years and the shutdowns didnít help at all.

They are doing some out of the box thinking. They have been doing band concerts this year and this one was on my birthday. It was a Creedence Clearwater Revival tribute band. They put on a good show and the theater was a really cool place for a concert.

Wife and I went with several friends. Had a good time.

Bjrogg

PS Happy Easter
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Pappy on April 17, 2022, 06:22:15 pm
Very cool BJ, always like CCR. not to cold here now but man it has been wet, hard to do anything. ???
 Pappy
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: chamookman on April 18, 2022, 03:22:05 am
Thanks for posting BJ. I've been to that Theater many Years ago. Spent alot of time Fishing out of Harbour Beech, chasing Salmon and Perch during the Hay Days. My Favorite place to Fish in the State. Great Campground just North of Town too. Might be up that way in a couple of weeks, to Troll for Steelhead South of Town, where the Creek comes into the Lake by the Cemetary. Thanks for jogging My Memory Banks  (lol) ! Bob
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on April 18, 2022, 09:23:56 am
Thanks Pappy. Might be showing my age a little but I do like a lot of music from the 60,s thru the late 70ís. Just really a period that produced a lot of music.

They probably still are but I guess Iím a little out of the loop anymore.

Was really fun and I wasnít the only one with a touch of gray. Was more people there than my class reunion. Hope it works out for them.

Bob I know exactly where you are talking about. Iím not sure if the old Dickinsonís marina is still open. I havenít been there in ages. The power plant is closed and they tore it down.

North park is the campgrounds on north edge of town. All the ash trees died but itís still a popular campgrounds. My son works at Wagners Park. Itís a county park about 6 miles south of town right on the lakeshore. I prefer it over north park for camping. Pretty decent park.

The creek by cemetery is Rock Fall. Fishing off it has been a popular spot for ages. Also smelt and suckers up it creek.

Iím going to pm you my number. If youíre up this way give me a shout. Or anytime you want to chat text me.

We were going to start planting today, but itís supposed to snow 3 to 5Ē this afternoon.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on April 18, 2022, 12:05:04 pm
Wasnít really quite dry enough to plant and snow predicted for this afternoon.

Decided to get a few fields soil samples instead. This is rye cover crop seeded after early dig Sugarbeets last September. The wildlife really like this.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on April 19, 2022, 08:20:01 am
Looking out my window in afternoon
Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Buckskinner on April 19, 2022, 10:22:47 am
We had that yesterday morning, including the deer.  Very cool spring this year and next week is more of the same although we are supposed to hit 74 on Saturday for a taste of warmth and then back to upper 40's.
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on April 20, 2022, 04:39:53 pm
Well our snow is almost all gone again.

Got the lawn roller out. Today. Grass is going to need mowing pretty soon. Got mower all in tip top shape. Hopefully it doesnít make any trouble.

With the snow day I probably should have got more jobs done but I needed a little therapy.

I did some more tillering on the bow I started working on last spring. Arvin sent me this really nice stave.

I have her to 50 & 26Ē right now on the tree.

Shoots really nice.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: chamookman on April 21, 2022, 03:21:49 am
Nice - the Tiller looks Spot on ! Bob
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Buckskinner on April 21, 2022, 08:15:02 am
That'll hunt!
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: WhistlingBadger on April 21, 2022, 03:15:00 pm
Nice looking bow!

My girls are going crazy ordering garden seeds.  Looks like "we" are going to have to build a couple more garden beds this spring.   ;D
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Parnell on April 22, 2022, 01:09:10 pm
Nice looking bend and curves on that bow.  So the rye cover crop, is that intended to just hold soil during the early spring until you plant? 
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Buckskinner on April 22, 2022, 01:26:13 pm
Green manure.
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on April 23, 2022, 08:34:33 am
Thank You Bob and Buckskinner. It is from a very nice stave I almost ruined trying to get two bows out of. This is actually from the belly split. I ruined the top which should have been a even better bow. This stave has thick late wood rings and very thin early wood. It didnít split anything like I was use to . Iím sure glad I didnít ruin both. Learned something there.

Itís been a week I did a lot of running around and sitting in hospital. My wife wasnít herself. Wednesday she was very dizzy and complaining that her whole right side was tingly.

I took her to hospital and they did several test. Her results were good but she showed no improvements. They transferred her to a larger hospital to get a MRI. It took two days to get the MRI.

The first day she still showed no improvements and the tests they did run showed good results. I stayed till visiting hours were over then drove home.

The second day she seemed a lot better but still a little dizzy. She was able to go to bathroom without me helping her though and was more her cheerful self. At 3:00 they took her for her MRI. I never saw a doctor the whole time I was there but the RN said her MRI results were good and she was released. We drove back home . She is still a little dizzy. Never really got a answer so not sure were done yet.

Also my daughters little dog Zoey is really sick. We are going to have to get her to a vet somewhere today. We are very  worried about her.

Itís been raining a little every day so we still didnít get in the fields. Itís not early anymore. Really hoping things start going a little smoother and just get back to the normal hectic pace.

Steve the rye cover has several advantages it provides. Like you stated. It helps hold the soil in place and prevent wind and water erosion.

It also scavenges nutrients and holds them till it is terminated and decomposes. This works really well with spreading Biosolids.

Like Buckskinner said itís what we call ďgreen manureĒ and the real crop we grow well really like it.

It also really helps with the microbiology of the soil.

It also helps with the tilth of the soil. Allowing water to flow though the soil and helps prevent ďpondingĒ and water laying on top of the soil.


It also has its challenges. Itís like having another crop to manage.

It can use to much moisture on a dry year and not have enough left to plant your real crop.

It is great for environment and that includes a lot of grubs and insects that are not Beneficial.

It also can get to big and itís residue can keep the ground from drying enough to get your real crop planted

Gotta go lots of people asking how my wife is doing.

Get back when I can

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Buckskinner on April 23, 2022, 11:17:24 am
Prayers for your wife, hope everything works out.  The hospitals around here are the same way since they fired all the employees who didn't want the shot.

Last month my brother had to put his last blue tick down because of blastomycosis.  Started in the eye as was misdiagnosed then went to the lungs and it was too far along to have much of a chance of recovery.  Hopefully that is not the case for your daughter's dog!  My lab had an eye issue about 2 weeks ago so got a bit worried, they have him on antibiotics and medicated eye drops and are not sure what it is his lungs are fine, but the eye thing is lingering.
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on April 23, 2022, 12:19:07 pm
Thanks Buckskinner.

Yes thatís the way they are here to. My son in law worked in medical position all through the Covid stuff. Then he was forced to get the shot. He had his concerns about it. He didnít want to take it but they would have had to let him go if he didnít. He took it.

My wife and I took two shoots and we both got the virus twice after. One of my brothers didnít get shot. We all got the virus and fortunately none of us had serious problems. Really my brother and I had very mild symptoms.

Iím not against the vaccine and I donít want to turn this into a political issue. I really donít like that first responders who worked through the whole thing got fired because they didnít want the shot.

WB I really hope to see pictures of those seeds being planted and watching them grow.
So glad your family is excited about the coming growing season. Itís the same excitement that keeps me doing this every year. Hope you have a bountiful harvest.

Bjrogg

PS We got a Emergency appointment for Zoey at 3:00 this afternoon. I sure hope she gets better. My daughter canít have children and Zoey is really special to our whole family. I never dreamed about spending so much money on a dog when we were growing up, but we are going to now. I donít know where itís going to come from, but we really need her to get better
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: chamookman on April 24, 2022, 03:53:22 am
Prayers sent BJ ! Bob
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: M2A on April 25, 2022, 10:13:58 pm
Great looking bow there BJ. Sure hope you get some good news real soon on all thats going down.

Finished up with the saw work in the orchard about 2 weeks ago, while the fellas cutting the fine stuff out finished up last week. Been busy here last week or so. took a pic of some red delicious on Friday.
(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/52027783196_9545d2376f_w.jpg) (https://www.flickr.com/gp/158435722@N02/K13V60)IMG_4542 (https://www.flickr.com/gp/158435722@N02/K13V60) by Mike Allridge (https://www.flickr.com/photos/158435722@N02/), on Flickr
Today they are about in full bloom
(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/52030333968_dfc79d119e_w.jpg) (https://www.flickr.com/gp/158435722@N02/527zr0)IMG_4544 (https://www.flickr.com/gp/158435722@N02/527zr0) by Mike Allridge (https://www.flickr.com/photos/158435722@N02/), on Flickr
(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/52029253862_1ca9056044_w.jpg) (https://www.flickr.com/gp/158435722@N02/6eUM2m)IMG_4546 (https://www.flickr.com/gp/158435722@N02/6eUM2m) by Mike Allridge (https://www.flickr.com/photos/158435722@N02/), on Flickr
Had to work out the details on timing last week to get hives moved in, The bee keeper brought in 12 last night for the orchard and another 10 or so this morning for some berry crops. Seem to be some good active hives.         
Spent most of the morning riding around checking on things. Best bloom I have seen in several years, so far. they are talking low 30's several nights this week, with any luck there will be some cloud cover and keep things just warm enough that no damage occurs. Would not be a normal year if you didnt have one threat of frost during bloom. lol

Here's some pictures of some 4 year old Gala, high density planting. Wires keep the trees from getting pulled over from the fruit load. Top wire is about 7 ft off the ground. Still about 2 years from a full crop on these trees but they have nice size this year and should be able to fill some bins this fall.
(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/52029254982_5fa90ae7b5_w.jpg) (https://www.flickr.com/gp/158435722@N02/x8FZ8M)IMG_4547 (https://www.flickr.com/gp/158435722@N02/x8FZ8M) by Mike Allridge (https://www.flickr.com/photos/158435722@N02/), on Flickr
(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/52030335343_3ce386a739_w.jpg) (https://www.flickr.com/gp/158435722@N02/t1DL2o)IMG_4551 (https://www.flickr.com/gp/158435722@N02/t1DL2o) by Mike Allridge (https://www.flickr.com/photos/158435722@N02/), on Flickr
Took that last picture because you can see all the pollen that bee has on its back legs. If I recall it was a wild mason bee, not a honey bee. Kinda hard to tell in pic. Going to be a busy few weeks coming up then things should slow down a bit, for me anyway. :D
Mike       
             
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on April 26, 2022, 07:55:06 am
Thanks for the prayers and the pictures Mike. Iíve been thinking about you and your sweet corn.

Our weather has still been cold although we had a warm spell last weekend. Itís supposed to snow again the next couple of days. Lows in the mid 20ís for the next three nights. Weíre supposed to have sunshine till the weekend and then several days of rain again next week.

There are a few fields planted to Sugar beets now, but not very many. It got dry enough we probably had two days we could have planted. It snowed the day after both of them

No blossoms here yet. At lest I donít think any. I have still been running to doctors and veterinary every day. Really havenít seen my apple trees lately.

Susie isnít 100% yet, but sheís probably 92%. She still has been having dizzy spells and very low energy which is unusual for her. Yesterday she seemed to get her balance back. She had eye doctor appointment with specialist in City. I didnít want her driving so I took her. She had trouble with her eyes from sugar diabetes and the specialist had to fix them up . Itís been a year long process and she got a very good report on her progress.

Zoey still hasnít eaten anything in 6 days. Took her back to veterinary again yesterday afternoon. They took X-rays and good news no foreign objects in her system. She still has been vomiting and diarrhea. She has been drinking some water.

The vet wanted to keep her over night. Give her some different medicine for her stomach and take
x-rays again this morning. She is a sick doggie right now.

That isnít helping my wife and my wife being sick isnít helping Zoey either. That little dog, sick as she was sat and waited for my wife to come home from hospital. She knows when something is up. When Susie got home her little tail was really wagging. Even though she was still really sick. Iím hoping they both have a good day today.

I really donít know what has been happening on our farm. My phone has been making trouble and doesnít work when I go to City. This 5g tower stuff makes it almost useless when I leave our area.

I know my nephew was trying to get the new sprayer to work and having trouble. No surprise there. All this stuff is so complex. It takes awhile to get everything calibrated and figured out. He text me last night that he thinks he has it ready now. Now we need some good weather. Which seems to be in short supply. Maybe we can get good enough weather. Itís definitely not early anymore and to late to screw up. If we can get dirt dry enough to plant beets we will be going at the beets. Still way to cold for the corn, but we want to get the beets in the ground.

Thanks so much everyone who has said a prayer. It means so much to us.

Bob I was thinking of you everyday last week when I drove to Port Huron hospital. The boats were out on the big lake fishing from Port Sanilac all the way south. Maybe you were in one of them? Thanks for the prayers

Bjrogg

PS going to work now. Hopefully I can get this back to a farming thread again.
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: BrianS on April 26, 2022, 08:37:59 am
Bjrogg,
Prayers sent for your wife.
brian
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on April 26, 2022, 03:22:42 pm
Thanks Brian much appreciated.

Well I was hoping we wouldnít get any more precipitation but weíre getting rain switching to snow.
Itís yuck.

My nephew is moving into my dads house. There was a table there my grandpa built with six chairs he built. My dad sat around this table with his siblings growing up. My now past uncle built another one copying off grandpaís original. I now have both of them together in my man cave.

Itís kinda cool having these tables and chairs. They have a lot of family history and they look pretty nice here. They both have extensions if I really have a crowd.

Almost looks like they belong here.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on April 26, 2022, 03:26:36 pm
Looks like a Blackhawk flying back and forth along the shoreline. Hope their just training. Been a lot of boats out lately and I hope they arenít looking for someone.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on April 26, 2022, 05:32:35 pm
One more of the tables and chairs
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: chamookman on April 27, 2022, 04:57:55 am
Haven't been fishing. Saturday, Matt & I took His son Dan to the Sucker Tournament for Kids in Chessaning. Had a Blast watching the Kids. Tired of this Weather ! Those tables are way Cool, like the Man Cave too. I need to get out and Fling some Arrows  (SH) ! Bob
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on April 27, 2022, 07:29:07 am
Bob that sounds like a blast. When I was a kid spear season opener was the day before my birthday. I always spent it at my grandmas and my uncle who was only 2 years older than me and I always went sucker fishing. We would catch a bunch and grandma would can them. Man that was primitive, raw excitement for a little kid.

Heard advertisement on the radio that Ubly Drag strip is opening again this year. They made some improvements and are hosting a couple events.

We got about four or five inches of snow last night. Temp is 27. Itís not looking like we will be able to plant before it starts raining again next week. Getting tired of this weather to. Maybe I should go sucker fishing.

My wife is still at probably 92%. Praying she gets back to 100

Vet wanted to keep Zoey another night. Still wasnít eating anything. My daughter is going crazy. Iím sure Zoey is really missing us all to. Sure hope that little dog gets better to.

I guess we will see what the day brings

Bjrogg

PS Bob you have a invitation to sit at those tables if you get a chance
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on April 27, 2022, 11:31:27 am
Getting tired of this stuff.

Winterizing the sprayer again. Nephew thinks he has it ready to go now. Itís going to be a couple weeks at least till we can plant. If it wasnít for running to doctors and veterinary Iíd be really tempted to get out of here and head to the Classic.

Vet called this morning and they want to keep Zoey another day. Getting pretty worried about her.
Daughter is literally going crazy and I would bet Zoey is to.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Buckskinner on April 27, 2022, 01:03:17 pm
You guys ever have motorcycles run under your sprayer on the road?  My neighbor did and said is scared the hell out of him, said the guy was going about 100 mph when it happened.
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on April 27, 2022, 01:47:08 pm
You guys ever have motorcycles run under your sprayer on the road?  My neighbor did and said is scared the hell out of him, said the guy was going about 100 mph when it happened.

This is our first self propelled sprayer. Our others have been tractor and pull type. They canít fit under those.

Iím hoping they donít try, but Iíve had people I know say that they have had 4 wheelers drive under them . 

 Itís really not a good idea. Might be a thrill but you never know when they are going to turn and run you over.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on April 28, 2022, 04:24:19 pm
Well Susie is at least 96% now. Seems to be getting close to normal.

Zoey is still one sick doggie. She spent two days and nights at the vet and still isnít eating. We brought her home. She was so happy to see everyone her little tail was really wagging. Maybe now that everyone is home sheíll be less stressed and recover.

My son and I picked stones with the gator in the wheat field.

Took a picture where I picked up a rock.

Wheat is greening up nice, I can see the clover we seeded is up. Thatís why we like to put it on early. It comes up early enough to catch a little sun before the wheat shades it out.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on April 28, 2022, 08:07:42 pm
Canít seem to post pictures with my new phone
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: M2A on April 28, 2022, 11:28:03 pm
You got on heck of a man cave BJ! Those tables fit right in there.

That high-boy sprayer must get some ground covered in good time, but you got lots of ground to cover. I just have a pull behind with a single 30 foot boom for sweet corn. But this new one is all hydrolic so I dont have to get out of the cab any more to fold it up or make adjustments and thats so nice. Little things like that and AC in the cab make all the difference. Amazing how far ag tech has come over the years.

29.8 degrees F at dawn this morning. With apples in full bloom damage starts at 28 so dodged a bullet there but still spent some time checking for damage. Looks like the low tonight is 32 so if that holds true things will be ok and then its supposed to warm up.

Had time at the end of the day to run a bunch of arrows through a BL bow Im finishing up for my younger boy. A few more tomorrow and it should be time to pretty it up. Good thing, Im running out of time to get this one done.
Mike       
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on April 29, 2022, 07:59:45 am
Thanks Mike. The man cave has been a 30 year work in progress. It literally was a falling down old three car garage when I bought the place. It was totally crammed full of junk to.

Itís a pretty comfortable place now. My wife calls it our basement. Our house doesnít have a lot of room for entertainment and the basement isnít much. Itís a old farm house that most people would have given up on but we have done a lot of work over the years and we like it. Probably could have built a new one easier.

This is our first high boy sprayer. Iím hoping we really like it. Our last sprayer was a 120í wide pull type and we really made good use of it. It was 18 years old and would have been retired long ago if we werenít good shop people. It folded out with hydraulics to and my cousin was amazed how it did. He took video of it and said it was like the transformer movie. I remember folding them by hand and they never worked really well after they got some wear and tear.

Really hope your apples are safe. And your sweet corn too. Itís not that unusual to get snow here end of April beginning of May. Usually we get some nice weather though to. Nice weather has bee hard to come by so far. Hopefully when it comes it stays.

Hope you and your son enjoy some good quality time flinging arrows.

Susie seems to be back to herself again. Zoey spent 3 days and nights at the vet. She still wasnít eating anything.

She was so happy to see everyone and that really gave her the perking up she needed. She lost so much weight and the vet wasnít very optimistic about her recovery but she was running out of options. She gave her a steroid and we took her home. She was to weak to climb stairs and very tired, but she was very happy to be home. Last night when I got home she did her normal barking routine. Itís our way of saying hello. I tell her grandpa is home and she barks her greeting to me. She came by me when I was eat and I got her to eat a little bit of chicken and a liver treat. After I finish supper she hoped up in my lap and enjoyed a good petting. She fell asleep on my lap with a big smile  on her face. She kept everything she ate down and is still sleeping. Iím cautiously optimistic. I told my daughter not to give up yet, but not to get her hopes up to much either.

I slept good to. Itís so nice to have everyone home again.

Bjrogg

Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on April 29, 2022, 10:40:22 am
I needed a distraction this morning and I went back to the woods to find it.

I traded someone for this long horn skull two winters ago. It was almost fresh with all the meat and hide still attached. It had been sitting at its former owners woods for a couple months so I didnít feel like cleaning it up. I just put it back by my woods.

I was going to leave it till summer but with our weather delays and all the crazy stuff going on I needed a distraction like this. Going to try to finish cleaning it up.

Hope I can post pictures

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on April 29, 2022, 10:45:40 am
Longhorn
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on April 29, 2022, 11:58:38 am
Washing up a little.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Buckskinner on April 29, 2022, 12:17:43 pm
Glad to hear your wife is back to normal and pup is headed in the right direction!

That's a nice longhorn skull! My Dad had a set of horns in his office that he bought at the Fort Worth Stockyards in the 60's, had nearly a 7' span, my brother has them now.

I remember my Dad got a deal on about 6 longhorns when we were kids, we had about 200 feeder cattle and he was always looking for a deal on cattle. Well soon found out why they were cheap, damn near impossible to finish a longhorn, skinny buggers that did not put on weight...  We ended up selling them to Laotian's that would come out to the farm and butcher on the spot, had rituals and such prior to the slaughter.  They took everything but what was in the stomach and intestines.
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on April 29, 2022, 12:28:38 pm
Yeah I donít think the ones at the neighbors are any fleshier than the one on the range. Thinking it was pretty lean beef.

Hereís one on my pickup tailgate. From taillight to taillight

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on April 29, 2022, 01:39:06 pm
Still need to put the lower jaw back together but Iím thinking this is his new home.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Buckskinner on April 29, 2022, 02:51:33 pm
That would go in my Man Cave!
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: GlisGlis on April 30, 2022, 09:27:55 am
I'd be tempted to try a horn bow out of it
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on April 30, 2022, 11:12:21 am
That would go in my Man Cave!



As soon as I saw him I was thinking this was the spot. I really like him here. I do think he would look great inside to. Heíd take up some real estate and I already have a lot of stuff in there and more to find a spot all the time.

Maybe this winter Iíll bring him inside.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on April 30, 2022, 11:17:16 am
I'd be tempted to try a horn bow out of it


If he was strung right now. Heíd have a pretty nice braced profile.

Pretty decent reflex if itís unbraced profile.

Bjrogg

Maybe If I can get another one
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on May 02, 2022, 10:37:07 am
Well Zoey and Susie are both doing much better now. Thatís a huge relief.

Weather is still not letting us get anything done. Not completely soaked, but just canít quite get dry enough to plant.

Have so much to do and canít do any of it. When that happens I tend to start or finish up another project to keep my mind right.

Yesterday helped my nephew move into dadís house.

Then I went for a walk on the beach. I picked up several interesting things. One was this piece of driftwood. I think I can probably do something with it.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on May 02, 2022, 10:39:34 am
Then I went to the cedars looking for a handle for this lance point.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on May 02, 2022, 10:41:07 am
Now I stripped the bark off and Iíll let it dry some.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: chamookman on May 03, 2022, 04:16:42 am
That Lance is cool ! Will send You a pic of a War Club I just finished - Bob.
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on May 03, 2022, 08:12:58 am
I did manage to get something done yesterday.

We ended up getting biosolids and I finished spreading the wheat at grandmas. It went pretty good and itís supposed to rain today so that should be good timing. I finished about 11:00 last night so Iím a little slow this morning. It felt good to get something done though.

Hopefully the big rain misses us. And we get some nice weather after.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: BrianS on May 03, 2022, 09:47:07 am
Very nice work on the lance and the arrow. I especially appreciate the look of your hand cresting. Enjoying this series of posts. Thank you.
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on May 03, 2022, 12:55:49 pm
Thanks Brian. I appreciate that. I always enjoy your videos to.

The crest is pretty much what I started with from my second arrow. Iíve tried a couple different color combinations. Kinda liked John Deere green and yellow but dang they were hard to find. Not that these are really easy either. They have been my colors and crest for quite a while now.

We had one wheat field that didnít get biosolids. It needed to get its first application of fertilizer. We always split our nitrogen applications. We put about 2/3rds on now and the second third in a few weeks. That makes the nitrogen available when the crop needs it and lowers the risk of losing any from a large rain event.

Normally we would have to apply fertilizer to all of our wheat now, but because of the biosolids we will put the rest of our fertilizer on when we would normally do our second application.

We did try out our new sprayer though and everything worked. Iím sure we will learn lots of little tricks before the season is over, but we are getting started.

Bjrogg

PS really strange having the spray boom out front. Going to be interesting
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Buckskinner on May 03, 2022, 02:29:11 pm
Never was a fan of spraying, I'd rather pick rocks.  Herbicides and me don't get along.  I remember when I had to spray crops as a kid my glands under my chin would swell up and I'd get a funny feeling in my throat.  I finally told my dad I was done spraying and that was that.   My dad died from a very aggressive Alzheimer's a few years ago and I'm guessing being around all of those chemicals did not help although hid dad died with Parkinson's as well (also a farmer) so I realize my odds aren't great.  I remember my dad taking apart nozzles and blowing through them to clean them out, never using gloves or even washing up after getting herbicide, pesticides, fungicides or you name it on him.

To this day when I use Roundup around the yard (which is very sparingly) I still feel my glands swell up even though I use gloves and am very careful mixing and use the wind when I apply.. 

So hopefully you guys are using your PPE!
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on May 03, 2022, 07:40:14 pm
Yes we use PPE.

We actually do all of our mixing in our chemical building. It has ventilation and spill containment. It is designed specifically for storing and mixing. We followed suggestions from NRCS.

I went home early today and some friends came over. They really liked the longhorn and the tables to. Rained all afternoon so be a few days at least.

also the sprayer cab is positive pressure to keep unfiltered air out.

Alzheimerís runs really hard in my dadís family. On or off the farm. My dad is nearing the end of his journey I think.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Buckskinner on May 04, 2022, 11:34:04 am
Sounds like you guys are as safe as possible and glad to hear it.  It's a far cry from what we used to do, no PPE and either pouring chemical by hand or a hand pump out of a drum and then our tractor we used for spraying was an International 806 which didn't have a cab. Even when the 856 was available which had a cab, both doors and rear window was usually taken off because no A/C back then in our tractors.   Was a different world back then I don't think we even had pair of safety glasses in the shop....
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Parnell on May 04, 2022, 12:30:38 pm
An interesting conversation.  My mom is nearing the end of MSAÖmultiple systems atrophy.  Itís rough business.  She is essentially trapped inside of her own body unable to swallow well, speak, move well.  But, her mind is 100%.  They call is ďThe BeastĒ.  I have read that there may be an association with strong herbicidesÖwhich she handled for years and years doing environmental restoration workÖno clear answer, though.
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on May 04, 2022, 12:54:02 pm
Yes I agree buckskinner.

Not only has the equipment gotten more comfortable and efficient. It has become so much more accurate and gps has made swath control the normal.

Most farmers I know have gotten smarter about using them to. We have lots of meetings in the winter that we attend. They provide lots of very valuable information about how diseases, insects and weeds are best attacked. Thresholds to determine what and if something needs to be done and  timing of applications that are best. Some are determined by life cycles and stages of it. Some are determined by size of weeds. Some are determined by weather conditions and if thereís a friendly environment for the pest. Some are determined by insect traps set up by our state organizations.

I still donít like spraying but we try to do it as responsibly as possible. We follow best management practices set up by NRCS.


Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: BowEd on May 05, 2022, 09:30:02 am
Seems like this extended cool weather goes on and on around here.Along with it being too wet.Does'nt bother most I guess.Just the people who have to grow things.Lots of farmers sitting on their hands waiting on this weather.
This is the latest I've ever seen and I'm almost 70 years old that the trees do not to have at least leaves beginning to show on them.
Ground temperature is slow to rise this year.

It's a double edged sword in this world raising food for the country and the world,but if you want to see a real crisis be without food.
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Buckskinner on May 05, 2022, 10:56:00 am
All the people up in arms about global warming, what would really be devastating is global cooling. 
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on May 05, 2022, 11:09:27 am
All the people up in arms about global warming, what would really be devastating is global cooling.


And we know thatís happened several times in the not so distant past. At least in geological time.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: WhistlingBadger on May 05, 2022, 04:28:09 pm
The Badgerling went a little nuts with the garden seeds.  They're taking up most of the kitchen table now.  But most of them are sprouted and hopefully we'll get them into the garden in the next week or two.  Hard to post pictures because I can't post from my chromebook at home--something about the forum's security settings being out of date--but I'll try to get some one of these days.  Enjoying the journey with you, BJ.
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: M2A on May 06, 2022, 09:45:48 am
Figured the cool spring was just a local thing but sounds more wide spread. I have noticed the trend for delayed warm weather in the spring for a number of years now. Without looking into my records I'd say 2 weeks from the weather patterns in the 90's. This year being the latest I can recall.  That said the warm weather lasts longer in the fall.

Had one good dry day this week, spent all day in the orchards yesterday. Raining now and suppost to continue till Sunday. Bloom is almost over, Sent word to the bee keeper to get his ladies out this weekend. Looks like the cold weather threat is over here, Should have a good set of fruit this year. Long way to go yet but real happy with things so far. Have not had time to check on the corn but hear its up and doing fine. The rest of the crew showed up this week from down south, all been here before, good group of guys. Should be picking strawberries in 1 month.   
Mike       
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on May 06, 2022, 02:31:06 pm
Hopefully you can post pictures when things are greening up WB.

Mike glad to hear things are looking good so far. I know that whole long way to go bit to. Itís always nice to get off to a good start though. Always hate getting behind and trying to catch up.

Itís still cool, cloudy and damp here yet. It isnít raining though and sounds like we should be able to put a long enough string of dry days together to start planting in a few days.

Iím confident enough now that we mixed up fertilizer and loaded it in our truck.

Also opened beet seed boxes and mixed talcum powder. Our planter uses vacuum to hold the seed against the seed plate. It turns the plate to a spot that doesnít have vacuum and the seed drops. Itís actually a lot more complicated than that, but thatís the jest of it. The vacuum causes static electricity and sometimes prevents the small seed from dropping so we use talcum powder mixed in our seed to keep the static from holding the seed. Iím going to mix it all today and it will save me a lot of time when Iím actually planting.

This is what the seed I plant looks like. Itís processed and they coat it with a ground up paper product to make it more plantable. Each company has its own color. This oneís is blue.

It comes in boxes and each box holds 4 units. Each unit is 100,000 seed so 400,000 seeds in a box.

The raw seed without the coating. In the old days each seed would grow several plants. They had to be ďblockedĒ or thinned. Mono germ seed saved a lot of labor.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on May 06, 2022, 02:40:15 pm
Also because I still have individual hoppers for each row. I figure out how many lbs. of each variety I have and divide that by 18 for the number of hoppers. Then when Iím filling the planter I weigh how much I put in each hopper. That takes a little extra time but saves me a lot of time and hassle trying to scratch seed from hoppers that still have seed and putting it in ones that ran out.

Planting time can be really hard to come by so when I get it I want to spend as much of it actually planting as I can and the least amount filling the planter and scratching seed.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on May 07, 2022, 07:32:51 pm
Filled planter with seed and fertilizer.

Started planting. Still took a few acres to get everything zeroed in.

One month to the day later than started last year.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on May 07, 2022, 07:33:59 pm
Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: chamookman on May 08, 2022, 04:39:04 am
Kewl ! Bob
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Buckskinner on May 10, 2022, 11:31:37 am
Looks like the neighbor who rents my land had a untimely breakdown.  They tried to pull it with the other tractor and it wouldn't budge, hopefully not a tranny and something simple...
Still there this morning.
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on May 10, 2022, 04:42:06 pm
Hopefully itís just a sensor for park. I had that happen to me once. Was all done with field and took fertilizer truck back. Got a ride back to my tractor and it wouldnít move. Their getting to be to many sensors.

Well Iíve been planting sugar beets since Saturday. I did have to do a bunch of wrenching on the fertilizer attachments. The ones my nephew made didnít work and we had to put old ones back on.

Yesterday I planted our closest beets to the piling ground. Literally right across the tracks. You can see one of the pilers across the tracks

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on May 10, 2022, 04:49:47 pm
Today Iím planting our furthest field from pilling grounds. This one is almost 40 mile round trip to town. With fuel prices Iím thinking probably shouldnít have panted this field. Harvest probably going to be expensive.

Dry and windy now. Next problem is going to be keeping them in moisture. Canít plant beets very deep. Thatís another reason itís nice to get them planted early.
Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on May 10, 2022, 05:33:57 pm
A rock

And no those tracks arenít from it rolling out of the way by itself.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on May 11, 2022, 07:33:57 am
We almost got done with sugar beets last night. About 25 acres to go. Had sprayer pump quit. I replaced it with my spare pump. Started tractor back up and fuel lift pump quit. Tractor wouldnít stay running.

Iím sure hoping they have a new one I can get this morning. Hearing all kinds of stories about people unable to get parts for their tractors and down time is a real killer. Glad we got as much done as we do, but itís time to keep the planter going. As soon as I get done with sugar beets Iíll switch planter over to corn. Then to soybeans. Got lots of spraying to do to.

This farm is right by the lake to. You can see it in this picture

Also one from behind planter. I keep checking to see if seeds are still in moisture.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Buckskinner on May 11, 2022, 09:30:01 am
You guys are cruising right along!  Hopefully you got some rain last night. it missed us but we have good moisture yet.

Looks like it must have been something like the park sensor.  I agree too much electronics these days to go wrong, I miss the linkage days, when it wouldn't go into park there was likely a pin missing...

My grandparents bought this new in 1945 and it replaced horses, was their main tractor for decades.  The B was kept in the family and my aunt gave it to me in 2020, so I rebuilt it and got it running again that winter.  Fun project and very easy to work on, although I have more money into than it's worth...  Wish my dad was still around to see it, he would have gotten a kick out of it.
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on May 11, 2022, 11:24:46 am
Thatís great news it was a sensor even if it is aggravating being down.

AC  model b was a nice little tractor

Got to closest John Deere dealer at opening and they didnít have my pump. Had to go to another store. $1,100 and 130 miles later I have my tractor running again. No rain yet. We are really about perfect for moisture but sugar beets can only be planted about a 1 1/4Ē deep max and this time of year it can easily dry that out before they germinate. I saw a lot of farmers scratching to see if their seed was still in moisture on my trip for parts

Cloudy now so maybe we can keep them in moisture.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on May 12, 2022, 07:02:10 am
Well I got tractor fixed and finished planting sugar beets. Now hopefully they come up.

I switched the planter over for corn and planted our two fields. Since we lost acres we donít grow much corn My son still grows some though and I plan on hitting his hard today. I have seed in the planter and ready to go.

Thereís going to be a lot of money buried in the ground this week. Sure hope it sprouts and grows.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Eric Krewson on May 12, 2022, 08:39:38 am
My brother-in-law and his son were big time farmers before he died, their hobby of buying a few old tractors to restore blossomed into a major obsession over the years, when he died they had 125 of them, all restored to be like new. They had the resources to build a building to house them and the simi trucks to take some of them to old tractor shows far and wide. When the kids decided to auction the tractors off a huge crowd of buyers came from all over the country for the sale.

Now the son and son-in-law are the farmers, the son-in-law got into tractor pulling on the side. He has a full blown nitro tractor and has won on a national level. He said his winnings kept him in the black only part of the time and although he loved it it was a very expensive hobby. He said the regularly blows an engine and it cost $125K to repair it.

Here is his tractor;

   
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Buckskinner on May 12, 2022, 09:55:39 am
Curious what he farmed to have that kind of hobby budget?  I don't know any that could afford blowing $125k routinely!!!  Good for him!
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Eric Krewson on May 12, 2022, 10:50:10 am
He farms 750 acres of row crops, mostly corn, soybeans and wheat, he has won the grand national championship for 2 years in a row so he has some sponsorship and prize money coming in, just not quite enough to make pulling completely profitable.
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on May 13, 2022, 07:12:34 am
One of my highs school classmates got into tractor pulling. You definitely need sponsors. Very expensive hobby. Even with good sponsors. Heís not farming anymore, or pulling tractors. Must really be addictive when you get it in your blood. The work and money involved is substantial. I think I will stick to my primitive hobbies.

We have a couple tractors and semi trucks we have restored. Some we sold and some we still use regularly. The yellow 1985 Kenworth is my favorite of our trucks. We ďrestoredĒ it about twelve years ago. Itís still looking pretty good. Itís on my fertilizer tanker right now.

My sonís beef operation. Iím planting corn right next to it. The yellow Kenworth is next to the barn.

Bjrogg

Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Pappy on May 13, 2022, 07:13:21 am
Just catching up BJ, looking like things are coming along. Nice tractor Eric, looks like it would pull a load. BJ really like you man cave, especially the Miller signs, I worked for them for almost 40 years and have many old ones like that, I collected metal signs/mirror's and all sorts of other advertisements for years, they are hard to come by and people try and beg me out of them all the time for their house bars and man caves.  ;) :) Glad the wife and pup are doing better. ;)
 Pappy
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on May 13, 2022, 07:51:51 am
Thanks Pappy. Got the Millerís sign from my son in law. Iím so glad my wife and Zoey are doing better. My brother had his MRI and meet with his doctors yesterday. They are going to start Chemotherapy and then Radiation. Then see what happens. I didnít get to talk to him yet, but doctors said lots of people keep working through the treatments. Everyone is different and wonít know how it affects him until he gets it.

My oldest son ( actually step son) helped one of our bachelor Neighbor's since he was 14 years old. Cass our old timer buddy had a heart attack then and required triple bypass surgery. That was probably 20+ years ago. Cass was in the hospital for over a month. My son rode his bicycle 9 miles every day to take care of Cassís cattle. When Cass got back from hospital he was still very weak and my son kept talking care of his cattle. My son became the son Cass never had. They made a really good team. Iíve known Cass all my life. We got along really well and it wasnít like losing my son. It was more like gaining a Uncle, or something like that.

Cass was a interesting character. He had a shop we all call the hanger. We started meeting at it on Saturday mornings many years ago for a cup of coffee and breakfast. Cass drew a crowd of interesting old timers there and it was in front of that crowd I broke my first Selfbow. They all had a big laugh over that. Later they were very impressed when I got up the nerve to bring my second selfbow there and shot several arrows I had made. They turned out to be some of my biggest supporters.

The crowd of old timers has passed away. Iím almost the oldest one now. We lost some really good people and I am so glad that they were part of my life and my families.

Cass passed away last winter. His old pickup was affectionately named Ray after his brother in law he got it from. Cass had a lot of health problems the past few years but he always loved keeping up with what was happening on the farm. He loved to take ďRayĒ out to the field. Park somewhere out of the way and watch the operation.

Yesterday planting my sonís corn. He brought the seed corn out to me in Ray and left it parked in one of the spots Cass always watched from. Man it sure felt like he was still watching everything. Iím sure he is.

Hereís Ray

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: chamookman on May 14, 2022, 03:11:24 am
Nice story ! Touching for sure - Bob.
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on May 14, 2022, 10:24:30 am
Thanks Bob. I have been very fortunate to grow up where I did and to have had some very good friends and neighbors.

Yesterday Me and my shadow finished up planting my sons corn. Just the two of us. My son went to a feeder cattle sale. Nice to see my shadow again it seems like itís been such a cloudy spring until last week.

Our rye cover crops are really starting to grow and itís time to terminate them. They will grow really fast in this weather and use up a lot of moisture. If they get more than about 1 1/2í tall the residue gets difficult to deal with. My nephew is learning and liking the new sprayer. Thatís really good news for me, as that takes a lot of pressure off of me. It will be very nice having someone to share the job.

Less than a full week and looks like the first beets I planted are coming up really nice and taking in the sunshine. This ground is more loam and doesnít dry as fast after tillage.

The fields I planted after this one are heavy ground and it really dried out the top few inches after it had tillage with the wind and sun. I looked at second field I planted last night. Some sprouted and nice tap root. Right next to it laying in dust.

We have some sprinkle showers predicted for next few days. Hopefully they will make it yet.

Really hard planting beets in those conditions. You can plant them to shallow to sprout, yet at the same time to deep for when the rains and following crust comes.

Bjrogg

Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on May 14, 2022, 10:25:16 am
Me & my shadow
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on May 14, 2022, 10:26:33 am
Rye cover crop seeded last fall after sugar beet harvest.
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on May 14, 2022, 10:28:26 am
Two newly emerged sugar beets enjoying the sun. Solar power
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on May 14, 2022, 11:47:58 am
My daughter in law is a ag. Teacher and FFA Adviser. They are having their banquet and a silent action tomorrow.

I promised her a week ago Iíd make a arrow and display stand for it. Didnít have a lot of time, but tried to do a little every day and by golly I think it turned out okay.

Clear coat still drying but itíll be ready.

I think itís a jasper point I knapped a couple weeks ago. Nice stuff.

River cane shaft with my Bjrogg markings

Pitch glue and sinew haft

Wild turkey tail feathers and a Cherokee two fletch.

Driftwood stand from the shores of Lake Huron.

Arrow is easily removed if wanted to yet securely and gently held on with removable ďstaplesĒ made from insulated copper wire.

I like it .

Might have to bid on it myself

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: BrianS on May 14, 2022, 09:40:22 pm
Beautiful arrow!
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Pappy on May 15, 2022, 06:48:25 pm
Nice arrow BJ, That should do well at the auction. :)
 Pappy
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Deerhunter21 on May 16, 2022, 12:12:45 am
Wow! Thatís a beauty bj! Iím sure that will fetch a good price at the auction!
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on May 16, 2022, 07:48:43 am
Thank You Brian, Pappy and Russell.

The arrow and display did ok. It brought $100 and I think thatís pretty good for that crowd. Not like there were a bunch of primitive fans there. Iím happy it brought that much. Most people donít realize how much goes into making one of these. Itís going to a good home and the money will help their FFA chapter to. I say itís a win win. I have meet the lady who got it and I know her husband has a nice hunting cabin Iím sure itíll look great in.

We got a really spotty shower Saturday night on the way to church. That got one of our beet fields back in the moisture. Had a good shower overnight that Iím hoping got the rest of them in moisture. Glad we had the window to plant our beets and corn.

Today I will probably catch up in the office and shop. Maybe take a little crop tour. Chance of rain every other day this week so when it dries out again we will have lots to do.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: chamookman on May 17, 2022, 03:33:59 am
Did You get any of those Storms, that roared thru Yesterday Afternoon ? Bob
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on May 17, 2022, 07:12:01 am
Did You get any of those Storms, that roared thru Yesterday Afternoon ? Bob

Got the thunder and lightning, but very little rain so that was good. We didnít need a big splash so that was good. I was working on computer when the thunder and lightning started. It definitely got my attention.

In the morning I took a little crop tour. Then I had to go to town to get my new phone to receive my emails. I was glad I didnít try to do it myself. It took several tries for the lady that did it. I thanked her. Told her that would probably have taken me three days and a bunch of bad words. She got a laugh out of that, but Iím thinking that was probably a pretty accurate assessment.

The sugar beets all had a really nice shower.  The ones that stayed in moisture were coming up and the ones that werenít in moisture were now. Forecast is for .3Ē tomorrow and another .3Ē on Friday. That should give them a pretty good chance if itís correct.

Took a couple pictures.

Last field planted just coming up. Havenít seen the sun yet. Still white or yellow. Look healthy though.

The first field planted. Beets that stayed in moisture up nice with a good stand. Still lots of places where they didnít stay in moisture, but are now. Hopefully those make it yet.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: WhistlingBadger on May 17, 2022, 10:46:29 am
Always enjoy catching up on this thread, BJ.  Love that arrow, especially the jasper head.  Glad the wife is doing better, and glad you're getting the crops in.  They grow a lot of sugar beets up in the Bighorn Basin where I grew up, and they really have to nurse them along some to get them going in the Wyoming clay.

Those great big, tall, white plants scattered in your field, now...those must be what grows when you plant one of those helicopter seeds?
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Buckskinner on May 17, 2022, 11:00:35 am
That is a sweet arrow, should have gotten more!  Still waiting for my beets to pop up in my garden, one of my favorite veggies.  Corn rows showed up yesterday behind the house and we could use some rain.  Very slow spring for getting crops in around here, I would guess only about 50% in now.
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on May 17, 2022, 11:13:19 am
Yea WB I wish it was that easy. The windmills were a real pain when they were putting them up and running all the underground wire. Itís a lot better now that they are sprouted and grown up.lol

Bjrogg

PS yes I worry about getting the beets planted. Then I worry about getting them up. Then I worry about all the things trying to kill them before I harvest them. Then I worry about harvesting them. Then I worry about getting them processed before they rot on the piles. Life would certainly be much less worrisome without them. Last year we had a record crop for tons. We had 25% more tons last year than our highest tons the year before. Unfortunately we had to dispose of 20% of our crop and the sugar content was so low that even if we could have processed every ton, we would have had about 10% less sugar. Itís still hurting and a lot of bad feelings with the growers here. Especially since other commodities have gone up in price and beets are so expensive to grow. And everything has gotten much more expensive this year
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on May 17, 2022, 11:17:52 am
Thanks Buckskinner. I was hoping it would bring a little more, but just happy it brought as much as it did. Iíve donated stuff before that only brought a few bucks. Like I said. Most people donít realize how much goes into one.

Iím glad we got the window to get stuff planted here. A lot of seeds went in the ground last week. A few guys planting again today.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on May 19, 2022, 07:56:22 am
We sprayed the rye cover crop to terminate it. It had done its job and now we need to prepare for planting our edible beans.

I have been spreading fertilizer the last two days and almost done now.

Kinda short handed again. My brother has a doctors appointment today and my nephew had a really high temperature yesterday morning. I havenít heard back from him yet today. I hope he gets feeling better soon.

We had a light white frost yesterday morning but I donít think it hurt anything we had growing. Turned chilly and cloudy with little sprinkles here and there. Iím hoping to finish spreading fertilizer this morning and then switch planter over to beans. I still need to plant about 75 acres of soybeans on sugar beet fields headlands and wedge rows. Itís another thing that takes a little extra time now but saves so much time when we are harvesting sugar beets. Digging headlands and wedge rows is very time consuming and when we have a full crew of truck drivers and harvesters we like to get stuff done and not have everyone watching me dig headlands.

I took another picture of one of the windmills on our farm for WB. If you look close you can see their service truck parked by it. Kinda gives it a little idea how big they are.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: WhistlingBadger on May 19, 2022, 10:34:10 am
We sprayed the rye cover crop to terminate it. It had done its job and now we need to prepare for planting our edible beans.

I have been spreading fertilizer the last two days and almost done now.

Kinda short handed again. My brother has a doctors appointment today and my nephew had a really high temperature yesterday morning. I havenít heard back from him yet today. I hope he gets feeling better soon.

We had a light white frost yesterday morning but I donít think it hurt anything we had growing. Turned chilly and cloudy with little sprinkles here and there. Iím hoping to finish spreading fertilizer this morning and then switch planter over to beans. I still need to plant about 75 acres of soybeans on sugar beet fields headlands and wedge rows. Itís another thing that takes a little extra time now but saves so much time when we are harvesting sugar beets. Digging headlands and wedge rows is very time consuming and when we have a full crew of truck drivers and harvesters we like to get stuff done and not have everyone watching me dig headlands.

I took another picture of one of the windmills on our farm for WB. If you look close you can see their service truck parked by it. Kinda gives it a little idea how big they are.

Bjrogg

Wow, those things are BIG!  There are a lot of them down in southern Wyoming, but I've always just seen them from a distance.
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Buckskinner on May 19, 2022, 10:53:22 am
Thankfully those turbines do not grow well around here...
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on May 19, 2022, 04:47:10 pm
Yea WB these are the biggest ones in our area. There have been several different groups or ďWind FarmsĒ put up in the thumb of Michigan.

From what I can see these where the most annoying putting them up, but have been the least amount of trouble running them.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on May 19, 2022, 05:19:38 pm
Buckskinner Iím certainly not a huge fan of them either. I do kinda wish they didnít grow so good around here.

They have had to change and fix about 1/3 of the ďsailsĒ or blades which go to land fills.
Otherwise these have been regular maintenance.

Some of the other ones were not so good. Several broken blades. And I mean broken in two pieces laying out in the fields.

They even had one that the blade hit the tower and the whole tower came down.

It has been entertaining.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Gimlis Ghost on May 20, 2022, 01:35:49 am
A couple of years ago a blade broke off one of these and landed in a school playground. A few minutes either way and it could have mowed down dozens of kids.
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: GlisGlis on May 20, 2022, 05:59:28 am
Bj do you have experience of birds being killed by the blades?
I've heard about it but never had evidence
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on May 20, 2022, 07:07:34 am
A couple of years ago a blade broke off one of these and landed in a school playground. A few minutes either way and it could have mowed down dozens of kids.

Yes so far I would say they have been fortunate that no one has been hurt or damage done to personal property. The zoning laws in our wind farm require them to be something like 2,000 feet away from a house. The smaller ones are much closer. They complained about that at first and I suspect itís one of the reasons for the larger ones, but Iím thinking that probably isnít a bad idea.

Gills I have often heard that to , but I have never seen even one dead bird laying under one. Iím not saying it doesnít happen , but I personally havenít seen evidence of it either and maybe we just donít have the type of birds that would be effected by them. I have always been curious what type of bird this is supposed to happen to. Most of ours have pretty good vision and itís not like the blades are spinning so fast you canít see them.


One other thing I have seen is ice. It gets built up and then breaks off and is flung through the air and I donít think it would feel good getting hit by it.

This particular model has had less trouble than some of the others. Itís the biggest model around. They need a really large crane to work on it. This model they have to put the blades on the hub one at a time at the top. They turn hub so blade to be put on is at 3:00 position and hoist blade to top.

The other types are smaller although they are still pretty big. Those all had the blades attached to the hub. Then the hub is hoisted blades attached to the top. They can actually use a smaller crane for them.

They got the really large crane stuck in our field. They crushed our tile main that was nine feet under ground.

Iím not totally against them, but Iím not a huge fan of them either.
Not totally convinced they are going to be the savior to the environment. Thereís alway advantages and disadvantages to everything.
Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Stoker on May 21, 2022, 03:26:15 pm
Looks like things are coming along Bjrogg. Got to do some farming with my son-in-law and his brothers couple weeks ago. Got to ride along in the new to them sprayer. Quite the machine GPS tracking, like the starship Enterprise. So much lining up with a fence post. Your right about the worrying. Hopefully everything turns out ok
Take care
Leroy 
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on May 22, 2022, 08:31:59 am
Looks like things are coming along Bjrogg. Got to do some farming with my son-in-law and his brothers couple weeks ago. Got to ride along in the new to them sprayer. Quite the machine GPS tracking, like the starship Enterprise. So much lining up with a fence post. Your right about the worrying. Hopefully everything turns out ok
Take care
Leroy

Thanks Stoker. We are coming along nicely. Hoping everything comes up and does well.

Glad you got to experience the space age ride in the sprayer. Of all the advancements in ag technologies I think I appreciate the technology that has gone into sprayers the most.

Like you said . It has gone from aiming for a fence post and having to remember what is sprayed and what isnít. Trying to match speed and pressure to get the right amount on. Skips and double up spots as a result.

Itís so different now. GPS with sub inch accuracy and auto steer to guide the sprayer. A coverage map thatís instantly updated to show what is sprayed and what isnít. Swat control that knows what is sprayed and what isnít that turns off individual sections of the spray boom where spray has already been applied. Very accurate rate controller that very quickly and accurately changes and applies the right rate to match your speed. Documentation of you chemicals used and a map of the rates applied.

It really is stuff from the space age and itís technology that is still making amazing advancements. The stuff coming out now is really mind blowing. Each individual spray nozzle is computer driven and turns on and off individually with swath control. Not only that , but it knows if itís on the inside of a turn itís traveling slower and adjusts it rate lower to put on the correct amount. If itís on the outside of a turn it knows itís traveling faster and increases itís rate to apply the proper amount. We donít have that yet but it is available technology and really amazing stuff.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: M2A on May 22, 2022, 10:47:57 pm
Things look to be moving along for you BJ. Don't know a thing about sugar beets but I have seen sweet corn fields come up uneven from lack of moisture, and that late stuff is usually not worth anything at harvest, so hope you been getting some rain there.  We been getting rain every other day for the last week or so. Had a hail storm cover the ground about 10 miles south last week, so glad we missed that one.

Been busy here. The crew has been transplanting tomatoes, peppers and strawberries when the ground is dry enough, and mulching blueberries otherwise. Sweet corn is a weekly planting until about the end of June. I've been in the orchard most of the time and will spend most of this week there. Between mowing, thinning, scab/fireblight sprays its usually a crazy 2 week period for me. By June things seem to become more routine through the summer.

Here's a pic of my high tech measuring device in the orchard :)
(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/52092844465_f3e924d420_w.jpg) (https://www.flickr.com/gp/158435722@N02/9NKY08)IMG_4606 (https://www.flickr.com/gp/158435722@N02/9NKY08) by Mike Allridge (https://www.flickr.com/photos/158435722@N02/), on Flickr
That was several days ago, I suppose that apple is 18mm by now.

A lot of hurry up and wait been going on because of the rains. Had a buddy stop by on Friday to drop off some graphic arts designs for my sons bow. I finished up a preform I had on my desk to give him as a thank you for his work.
(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/52092341306_3ecc010ec1_w.jpg) (https://www.flickr.com/gp/158435722@N02/1F5r2F)IMG_4617 (https://www.flickr.com/gp/158435722@N02/1F5r2F) by Mike Allridge (https://www.flickr.com/photos/158435722@N02/), on Flickr
Spent today in my shop finishing up a dozen target arrows. way too long in the making. Should have been doing other things, didn't realize how much time I spent down there until it was dinner time.
Mike               
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Stoker on May 23, 2022, 12:23:22 pm
Bjrogg you are right on with the ways of the newer machinery. We had to fix some sort of connection on the one wing when we refilled the tank. They explained it to me, I must of had the deer in the headlights look on my face. Good on them to make it go without too much disruption. Help is 1 hour away. Being self-reliant is a wonderful thing.

M2A Nice looking apples coming along. I like your apple gauge. My Granny Smiths are in flower right now. Coupla weeks away form pie season.
Thanks Leroy
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: M2A on May 27, 2022, 07:27:04 am
Good luck with your Granny crop Stoker. Their harvest date is not until the 1st week of November here which makes them a tad late sell in the market, not many customers after October. I did make a deal with a fella a few years ago and planted one in a hole, just as a pet tree. A rabbit got up on the snow above the tree guard and ate the bark off one winter. Left all the Gala around it alone. lol  Maybe got 15 apples off that tree. I should give it another go.

Been dry and windy most of the week, looks like a rainy spell for the next few days. Good chance to get some work done in the shop.
Mike       
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on May 27, 2022, 01:36:01 pm
Sorry I havenít been able to post much this week. I ended up catching whatever my brother and nephew had. Worked through it, but I just was to whipped at the end of the day to think about anything. Iím starting to feel a little better, but just a little.

I did finish up planting our soybeans and I even planted a small food plot for the wildlife. Be interesting to see how it affects things.

Last Sunday my neighbor and his son stopped over and tilled my garden. Then I switched 12 rows of the planter back to corn so I could plant my sweet corn. Usually my neighbor does with his four row planter but he was still planting soybeans. I planted 24 rows in really good conditions so I hopefully get a good crop to eat and put up in the freezer.

Our corn came up nice. Your right about the corn that comes up later Mike.  If a corn plant comes up just a day later than the plants right next to it. It will never catch up and really is almost a weed. Dr. B says it doesnít matter what you do to it it wonít catch up. You can even pee on it. Heís tried it.

My sugar beets have a few spaces I would have like to see filled in, but they are going to have to be good enough. They arenít quite as sensitive to neighbor as corn. Also the open spaces make it harder to control weeds.

We are getting ready to plant our edible beans now. I got the pre emergence herbicides this morning. Have the planter switched over to edible beans. Washed it up and cleaned up the Quadris system. I donít use it for the rest of my planting.

When I was picking up my herbicide I pasted one of the smaller windmills they were working on. They had the hub and blades on the ground.

Strawberries are really blossomed out nice.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on May 27, 2022, 01:38:57 pm
Strawberries
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: chamookman on May 28, 2022, 03:28:03 am
Hope You get feelin' better ! Bob
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on May 28, 2022, 07:35:32 am
Hope You get feelin' better ! Bob

Thanks Bob. Iím feeling a lot better today. My head still feels like a volleyball and my ears and sinuses are still a mess, but Iím definitely going in the right direction.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on June 01, 2022, 09:33:34 pm
Feeling a lot better. Still sinus pressure and ear fluid but much better.

Saturday we moved everything for planting navy beans to my brothers place. It takes a lot of stuff. Tractor and field cultivator, sprayer, tender, fertilizer truck, tractor and planter, seed wagon, tractor and roller, and loader tractor.

Itís a 14 mile one way trip so it took most of the day just moving stuff, but itís all there and ready now.

Saturday night went to my wifeís 40 year class reunion. Kinda small turn out. Probably past most of their bed times.lol

Sunday we got together with kids and grandkids for a nice campfire.

Monday and Tuesday we hit the planting navy beans hard. Monday I planted 162 acres. Tuesday I planted another 114 acres and moved everything back to Dadís. My nephew put the pre emerge herbicides on the black bean ground. It was hot and dry and the weeds are really growing.

The soybeans I planted last week are coming up.

The beet fields really need to be sprayed. Canít believe how fast these weeds are growing.

Today we got the sugar beets sprayed

Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Buckskinner on June 02, 2022, 10:37:37 am
Glad you're feeling better!

Yeah, weeds are a pita...  Not as common anymore, but I spent many of days on a cultivator as a kid trying not to wipe out the corn rows.

Is that volunteer corn to the sides of the picture?
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on June 02, 2022, 12:55:37 pm
Yes I spent many many hours cultivating sugar beets, edible beans and corn. I spent  a lot of hours with a hoe in my hand to.

I think what you are seeing is rye cover crop and volunteer wheat. The sugar beets we donít spray rye to kill before we plant. We just till field once leaving residue for wind protection. One of the really nice things about RR sugar beets. Before we had to spray several times while weeds were very small to kill them. Wind blew off sugar beets every year. It was very difficult to use cover crops. Even cultivating was difficult with cover crop residue. Made for more ďiron wormĒ as we use to call it.

Definitely a case where new and old ways work well together
Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on June 03, 2022, 06:32:50 am
Started planting black beans yesterday. Got 112 acres planted. We have another 107 acres of our blacks to plant and then about 90 acres for my son. Should be able to finish them up in about two days if everything goes well.

My brother got his port for chemotherapy put in day before yesterday. He has appointment with chemotherapy doctor today. I hope everything goes well.

I took two pictures yesterday. One of the residue from rye cover crop incorporated into the soil. The second after planting. Itís a lot of residue and the planter has been designed to brush it in between the rows so it can still get good seed placement in the soil.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Pappy on June 03, 2022, 07:54:10 am
Looking good BJ, our soybeans are up about 4 or 5 inches but could use some rain,was supposed to rain yesterday but none came, getting a little dry around here again. :)
 Pappy
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on June 03, 2022, 07:58:12 pm
You guys are a little bit ahead of us here. Soybeans donít like getting out of bed when itís still cold out. They will sit there with the ground shoved up but not come out of ground till it warms up .

Scratching seed by the woods. Looks like something is watching me.

Bjrogg




 
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: chamookman on June 04, 2022, 03:09:09 am
Classic Coon Tree BJ, He's hopin' You are planting Corn  (lol) ! Matt and I are gonna try and get a Mess of Bluegill today, for a Fish Fry. Prayers sent for Your Brother - Bob .
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on June 05, 2022, 09:26:45 am
Classic Coon Tree BJ, He's hopin' You are planting Corn  (lol) ! Matt and I are gonna try and get a Mess of Bluegill today, for a Fish Fry. Prayers sent for Your Brother - Bob .

Thanks for the prayers Bob.

It certainly is a classic coon tree. The raccoon is going to be disappointed to find out I planted black beans there. I donít think they really like black beans.

Good luck fishing. The waterís still pretty cold and those fish will be tasty and firm. Tell Matt I said Hi.

We did finish up planting my sons black beans yesterday. Like Pappy we are a little on the dry side. The little crops are doing fine yet but the wheat and hay could use some rain. A nice shower would perk everything up. Itís supposed to rain this week but itís been supposed to rain half the days of May and we havenít had more than a dust settler so we will see what happens. I planted the beans pretty deep.

Today we will be enjoying our grandsons 8th birthday and getting together for a party. So far heís our youngest grandson and they are all growing up to fast. Gotta enjoy them while you can.

Bjrogg


Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on June 06, 2022, 06:23:59 am
We had a really nice time at our grandsons birthday party. Was cloudy and cool. Played some ball. Nothing like a ball game to make you realize you donít have the moves you use to have. Was fun though.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on June 06, 2022, 06:30:24 am
The kids have a lot of animals and they are well taken care of. They have rabbits, big goats, little goats, mom goats and dad goats. Horses and steers. Laying hens and chickens.

Hereís some of them

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on June 06, 2022, 06:38:09 am
Then it was time for cake and ice cream.

My daughter in law is quite the birthday cake baker. She always makes some special cakes. I have lots of birthday cake pictures over the years. This time Cliff wanted a sports theme. Itís a nice cake, but honestly I like the farm and construction theme ones better. Itís a nice cake though and it tastes good. Cliff loved it and his cousin did to.
Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on June 06, 2022, 06:41:25 am
After the party I took a quick crop tour.

The wheat is just starting to head out.

The clover cover crop looks like it is still doing fine.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on June 07, 2022, 12:14:24 pm
Yesterday morning I did a quick look at the navy beans I planted on Memorial Day. They were starting to poke out.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on June 07, 2022, 12:17:50 pm
Then stopped at the Coop to fill up with E-85. Iíve got 170,000 miles on my truck and itís almost all I have burned in it. No problems at all. Sure is going to be a expensive fall if these prices donít come down before harvest and fall tillage.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on June 07, 2022, 12:28:18 pm
One of the best things about the new sprayer ended yesterday. I hadnít really run it yet.lol Sure was nice to have my nephew take over while I was planting. I usually had to somehow do both before and the days got very long.

Yesterday wasnít really raining yet it was dripping around just a little. Decided to apply the nitrogen on the sugar beets. They need nitrogen early and a nice shower to soak it in was forecast for today. Got the nitrogen applied to all the beets and we do get a beautiful slow .75Ē shower. Perfect timing. Still a little cool but Iím not complaining.

I guess Iím starting to feel comfortable in this spaceship of a sprayer.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: M2A on June 08, 2022, 08:37:10 am
Cake and ice cream always a good thing!

Nice view from inside that spray rig. I'll be getting my boom sprayer out this week for the sweet corn. drive past it the other day and noticed its about time for it to start shooting silk. Still might make the 4th of July for that 1st couple fields. The crew started picking strawberries Monday of last week, kinda a poor year for them as the deer and ground hogs put a big hit on them over the winter.

Finished up the bailing season the other night. 24 round bails, use to do about 700-800 a year so not much any more. Always enjoyed the work but trying to get all the timing down all summer long was a pain. and without a tedder I always needed 1 more day of drying time.

Maybe I'll have some time over the weekend to get a few pics up but I best be headed out for now.
Mike     

Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Stoker on June 08, 2022, 03:10:21 pm
Looks like it's coming along. Great your timing was on.
Thanks Leroy
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on June 12, 2022, 09:20:03 am
Hasnít been very good hay making weather here this week Mike. Hope yours is better.

I did manage to get the wheat sprayed for vomitoxcin. Itís a disease that can make your wheat toxic so it isnít safe for either human or animal consumption. We are getting perfect environmental conditions for it right now. The fungicide only offers limited protection. I hope itís enough because this is getting to be a very, very expensive crop year. We absolutely need decent crops.

Yesterday was one of those heart breakers. My daughters little dog Zoey took a dramatic turn for the worst. She was doing so good and just like that the switch was flipped. She passed away in my arms and it was a heartbreaker.

Our whole family is going to really miss that little dog. She brought so much joy to us. She was a blessing.

Growing up on a farm in learned about losing animals, pets and loved ones from a very early age. I know itís part of life. Some people may even think Iím cold hearted, but they are wrong. Just because I have grown up with it doesnít mean itís easy. RIP Zoey.

Could have missed the pain, but would have had to miss the dance.

Was a great dance Zoey

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on June 12, 2022, 09:44:34 am
Zoey
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Pat B on June 12, 2022, 12:18:23 pm
Sorry for your family loss, Brian. It's the love that makes it hurt so much and it's something we all experience.
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: chamookman on June 13, 2022, 04:21:15 am
Always sad to hear of a loss like that. Been through it too many times Myself. Bob
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on June 13, 2022, 07:41:12 am
Thank You Pat and Bob. I to have lost a lot of pets and loved ones. They all hurt. This one hurts especially bad.

We are so happy my daughter was blessed with Zoey. She was so good for her when she was going through some very difficult life struggles. Sheís broken hearted now, but I think she is going to be okay.
This truly was her baby as she canít have any of her own. I was a little apprehensive about her getting a animal that she had to train and care for, but she did a fantastic job of it.

We will be looking for another puppy. Not another Zoey. But hopefully a puppy that can give and receive love like that little girl did.

Thanks again Bob and Pat for your caring words. They do help.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Buckskinner on June 15, 2022, 07:29:22 pm
That's rough losing a pet, but a new puppy sure makes it easier.   Hopefully she can find one soon!  Maybe 2!

Growing up on a farm, pets came and went fairly often, lots of dangers for pets on a farm not to mention the road.  But there were those special ones that I remember very well and was rough when they passed.

My lab now has it made, he's lying in the kitchen right now because he thinks it's too hot outside.  Well,,,, I'm inside too...
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on June 15, 2022, 10:24:13 pm
Glad you have your lab Buckskinner. They really are good dogs. Have had a few and they were all smart well behaved dogs.

My wife and daughter have been looking for puppies. I think they might have found one. Afraid we canít afford two.

They are pretty excited and going to look at them tomorrow. I hope it turns of good. They are hoping the puppies are cute. All puppies are cute.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on June 17, 2022, 09:55:53 pm
My daughter got her new puppy. Named her Roxy and so far so good. Cute little bugger. My wife and daughter are so happy it really feels good to see that. We all still really miss Zoey, but we a happy to welcome Roxy to our family.

Itís been either on the cold side with short spells of just plain hot. It took awhile for the black beans to come up but we finally got a couple hot days again and they came up.

You can see the residue from the rye cover crop still on top of the soil. Iím really glad itís there right now. Weíve had three days of very high winds and if we didnít have the residue on top our dirt would be blowing and our beans would be getting cut off. Afraid there going to a lot of people who donít have residue that are going to have to replant and hope they donít blow off again.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on June 17, 2022, 09:56:47 pm
Black beans
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on June 17, 2022, 10:04:26 pm
Then we worked on our old 28% applicator. We had to add two more rows. Had to widen the frame. Plumb up two more rows and reconfigure the rate controller.

Got it all working today.

Corn needs nitrogen later so we split the applications and put most of the nitrogen on now just before the corn gets tall. Itís to the stage it really grows fast.

Was 94 two days ago high of 64 predicted for tomorrow. Lows back in the 40ís. We could use a little rain again, but Iím not complaining yet.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: GlisGlis on June 18, 2022, 05:10:51 am
Bj I know very little about agricolture so forgive me for the dumb question
Is there an automatic way to drive your vehicle so that it doesnt mash all the plants?
seems to me so easy to get distracted and destroy everything
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on June 18, 2022, 10:22:58 pm
GlisGlis in the old days we called it a steering wheel and we had to spend many, many hours steering it and it took a lot of concentration to avoid what we called "iron worm". Now we have GPS and auto steer that steers the tractor for us.

Today I went with my cousin to the Huron Nature Center. My cousin has a nice collection of artifacts that he has found. He's been giving a presentation at the Nature Center for 8 years. I've been doing one with him for four years now. Our presentations complement each other.

It was a small but nice gathering. 33 people attended which is pretty good for the center. They were a very interested and fun crowd. They seemed to really enjoy the presentation and asked lots of good questions. Kevin and myself really enjoyed doing the show and gave us a good excuse to get together again. We both like sharing our passions with others who appreciate them.

This Afternoon I worked at putting nitrogen on my sons corn

Bjrogg   
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: GlisGlis on June 19, 2022, 07:14:42 am
ty Bj
I recently read that during middle age the wheat harvest was less then 1.5 times what they sowed on average
Surely agricolture has made giant leaps
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on June 20, 2022, 02:59:11 pm
ty Bj
I recently read that during middle age the wheat harvest was less then 1.5 times what they sowed on average
Surely agricolture has made giant leaps


We plant between 1.5 bu. Per acre and up to 3 if it gets really late into end of October or beginning of November. We personally very rarely plant that late.

We shoot for 130 bu. Per acre harvest. And if we get below 110 we are a little disappointed. So I would say your right in your assessment GlisGlis. We are in a good climate for winter wheat though.

Also with harvest, storage and quality.

We had a really nice shower this morning. Catching up in the office. Our crops are really going to like this shower.

Played with the new puppy Roxy yesterday. Looks like a stuffed animal, but itís not. Funny they had a qualification list. Small, short haired and female. I guess they got two out of three.

Iím a little jealous. Sheís got a better beard than me.

Bjrogg

Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: chamookman on June 21, 2022, 03:34:19 am
Cute Pup ! Bob
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: GlisGlis on June 21, 2022, 06:27:07 am
Quote
We plant between 1.5 bu. Per acre and up to 3 if it gets really late into end of October or beginning of November. We personally very rarely plant that late.

We shoot for 130 bu. Per acre harvest. And if we get below 110 we are a little disappointed. So I would say your right in your assessment GlisGlis. We are in a good climate for winter wheat though.

I had to check how much is a bushel. For metric people imperial units are quite a nightmare  ;D
To tell the full truth in agricolture and forestal activities we also have non decimal units

Nice pup. She does not look very primitive  )P(   (lol)
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on June 21, 2022, 07:17:12 am
Thanks Bob.

Roxy spent her first night in her apartment last night. Hopefully everything went well.

GlisGlis we actually try to plant to a certain ďpopulation ď

We weigh one pound of seed and count how many seeds are in that pound. So smaller seed we plant less pounds than larger seed. Early in the planting season we try for about 1.2 million seeds per acre.

Generally thatís about 120lbs per acre planted. That would be two bushels

If we harvest 130 bu. X 60 lbs a bushel = 7,800 lbs harvested per acre.

I think if I did my math right thatís about 65 times more than what we planted.

Of course Mother Nature has her say in the mater to.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on June 24, 2022, 07:08:35 am
Finished up putting the nitrogen on the corn and sprayed the post emergence herbicides on the beans.

The little shower we had Monday was much appreciated. We have been a little on the dry side. We havenít had much rain, but what we have had has come really slow and every drop soaked in.

We are starting to get caught up in the fields. Still have a lot of stuff to do in the shop to get ready for wheat harvest.

My cousin is arriving tonight. We grew up inseparable. Heís been living in California for close to forty years now. He comes back to visit every summer and I try my best to make some time in my busy schedule for spending with him. Somebody has to keep him out of trouble.

Heís kinda responsible in a roundabout way for me being addicted to all this primitive stuff.

I decided to pay him back a few years ago by making him this HHB Selfbow. I named it ďDeep RootsĒ.
I know he has them. As he told me the other night. Time to come home and reboot my soul.

I think itís time to shoot his bow again to.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Buckskinner on June 24, 2022, 05:48:25 pm
That's a sweet looking bow!  Glad you are getting some rain here and there.  We've been really dry, my lawn is brown and the corn looks more like pineapple.  Seems like the rains always go north or south of us.
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Gimlis Ghost on June 25, 2022, 01:48:59 pm
ty Bj
I recently read that during middle age the wheat harvest was less then 1.5 times what they sowed on average
Surely agricolture has made giant leaps

Saw a documentary on the beginings of agriculture in the neolithic age.
They found that in much of the middle east and asia wheat grew wild in sufficient quantity that a family could harvest enough in two weeks to feed them for a year.
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Pappy on June 26, 2022, 06:14:13 pm
Nice looking bow BJ. Ya if we don't get some rain here soon the poor farmers around here aren't going to make anything, dry as I have seen it in several years, some are already feeding hay to the cows. ???
 Pappy
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: GlisGlis on June 27, 2022, 04:37:53 am
We are in the same situation. Terrible drought is posing a serious treath for all the cultivations
There are already ordinances to minimize the use of potable water. Pretty scary as "real" summer is yet to come
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on June 27, 2022, 06:52:10 am
It always seems like we are either to dry or to wet. Been that way as long as I can remember. Right now we could use some rain. Would be nice to get some now a then get dry for wheat harvest. Donít get to order the weather we want. Have to deal with what we get. Hope it works out.

Sometimes life is a Beach. In this case a nice secluded one. With a nice bonfire. My cousin and I sat around and tried to solve the problems of the world. Didnít get them all solved, but did enjoy trying.

Probably take another bonfire on the beach or two yet before he leaves. Itís a good place to hang out and think about anything. Or nothing at all

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: chamookman on June 28, 2022, 04:37:37 am
Great place to Stir a Fire  (=) ! Bob
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on June 28, 2022, 08:09:14 am
It sure is Bob.

Have had some really nice bonfireís there over the years. Hereís one from 4th of July. We had a great time and plan on making it a annual event.

Bjrogg

PS itís even a great spot without a fire. But a good fire and a full moon rising really adds to the ambiance.
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Buckskinner on June 28, 2022, 08:29:21 am
Looks like paradise to me!  I'd probably need to put a fishing pole in though...
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on June 28, 2022, 10:00:19 am
Looks like paradise to me!  I'd probably need to put a fishing pole in though...


You might want to bring a good pair of waders to

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Pappy on June 29, 2022, 07:57:02 am
Beautiful picture, looks like a great time. :)
 Pappy
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on June 29, 2022, 01:02:02 pm
Love to have you sit around a campfire sometime Pappy. Could probably even find a place to park the bus.

Getting ready for wheat harvest. Lots of stuff to do. Trucks, trailers, combines, headers, carts and tractors.

Iím cleaning up the planter and getting it ready to store away for the winter. It worked good. Probably do something different with starter fertilizer for it this winter.

Iím hoping to get some grass and weeds mowed down this afternoon.

Was my sons birthday yesterday and we had another bonfire at the beach.

Was perfect night for it.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: chamookman on June 30, 2022, 03:10:42 am
Beautiful Spot !
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on July 01, 2022, 07:43:08 am
Thanks Bob. If you ever end up in the neighborhood Iíd love to share it with you.

I did get some mowing done the other day. The grass was getting pretty tall. Probably about 4 or five feet tall. I saw lots of deer beds in it. I left their favorite ones.

My son put a bass from my dads pond in my little pond several years ago. Itís a small pond but itís pretty deep. Probably about 16í . I didnít see him last year and the frogs started to show up again, so I thought he might have fallen prey to the Bald Eagles.  Not so though. I saw him while I was mowing the grass. Glad to see heís still swimming around.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on July 01, 2022, 07:51:28 am
Was really hoping for some rain. We are still doing pretty decent and our smaller crops have been growing good. They are reaching the stage they are going to need a lot more moisture though. The wheat is turning. I think a nice rain might still help it, but soon it will be to late to help and only cause poor quality issues which we really donít need. Would be nice to get a couple inches of rain now before wheat harvest and then have a dry harvest.

Pretty hard to make a farmer happy sometimes. Always can find something to complain about. Would really like rain in this field but none in this other one. lol.

Iím not complaining yet. Corn still looks decent. Beans are growing.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: chamookman on July 02, 2022, 03:48:11 am
Those two look really good ! Bob
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on July 02, 2022, 08:03:05 am
Was hoping for some rain, but it missed us again. Yes Bob. Our wheat is really suffering and has needed some rain for some time. Iím not expecting fantastic yields from it, but maybe I will be pleasantly surprised. Our smaller crops are still looking pretty decent.

As a farmer. Iím outstanding in my field.  lol Thatís a old farmer joke.

Hereís a selfie for you all. Me outstanding in my field of navy beans.

Bjrogg

PS if you zoom in on base of windmill you can see my pickup truck

Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on July 02, 2022, 08:27:43 am
I was picking some asparagus and came across a bunch of these guys. One time I had thousands and thousands of them in my ash trees. Looked like pictures from the rain forest. My ash trees are all dead now, but we still get lots of monarchs.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Buckskinner on July 02, 2022, 09:41:33 am
Those wind spinners are massive!

Haven't had more than a sprinkle in several weeks here, very dry.  Crops look good in the morning from dew but then curl up when sun gets high.  My lawn is a beautiful golden brown aside from well rooted weeds.  Ash are all dead around here, you can see them in the background of the first pic.

Haven't seen any monarchs on any milkweed yet around here, but these little devil's whatever they are seem to be on every plant in place of them.
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: M2A on July 02, 2022, 09:45:32 am
Thats a heck of a nice location for a beach party BJ.

Hope you get a good rain soon. We had a storm roll through last night and drop almost an inch. Very welcome as things were getting very dry, I could even see the leaves in the old orchard starting to curl just a bit. The guys have been laying irrigation pipe in the corn all week here. And the pumps have been running every day. I was coming off the hill the other evening and got this pic.
(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/52187134852_09a25e0511_w.jpg) (https://www.flickr.com/gp/158435722@N02/m67m88)IMG_4744 (https://www.flickr.com/gp/158435722@N02/m67m88) by Mike Allridge (https://www.flickr.com/photos/158435722@N02/), on Flickr
Thats about 3 acres of corn, just starting to tassel,  getting some overhead water.

Going to be short on the early corn this year as it was too wet to get it all in but going to have some for the market for the holiday and thats the goal. here is an ear I pulled when out checking things the other day, Ate it right after I took the pic:)
(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/52188404384_0015755cd8_w.jpg) (https://www.flickr.com/gp/158435722@N02/332ipX)IMG_4753 (https://www.flickr.com/gp/158435722@N02/332ipX) by Mike Allridge (https://www.flickr.com/photos/158435722@N02/), on Flickr
Nice size for the first field of the season. It came from the field we planted in the snow back in April. Its a decent stand
(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/52188402619_a2eed819d1_w.jpg) (https://www.flickr.com/gp/158435722@N02/496F3r)IMG_4754 (https://www.flickr.com/gp/158435722@N02/496F3r) by Mike Allridge (https://www.flickr.com/photos/158435722@N02/), on Flickr
weed control could be better but I have seen a lot worse in the early stuff.
Also started picking blue berries this last week. Pick your own(PYO) opened yesterday for the weekend in the large field. Heres a pic from the small field. We have to net the entire field or the birds will eat every berry before the get ripe. 
(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/52188151291_83d852590e_w.jpg) (https://www.flickr.com/gp/158435722@N02/V86zAi)IMG_4714 (https://www.flickr.com/gp/158435722@N02/V86zAi) by Mike Allridge (https://www.flickr.com/photos/158435722@N02/), on Flickr
I cheated and went in early to get some for the freezer here is 2 gallons, about 10 pounds I got the other night.
(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/52188403494_e0b65630fe_w.jpg) (https://www.flickr.com/gp/158435722@N02/L11GGM)IMG_4742 (https://www.flickr.com/gp/158435722@N02/L11GGM) by Mike Allridge (https://www.flickr.com/photos/158435722@N02/), on Flickr
I use to have my boys pick them for us but they are older now and have other priorities. I picked 3 gallons this week, I hope to get 1 more before its all over but if not thats fine. Takes me 40-50 min to fill one bucket.
With everything going on between the farm and everything else time free time is very limited as of late. If I'm not doing anything else I have been spending my free time beating on a log that was gifted to me. Its been some long days the past week or 2.
(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/52188635625_c2499c1593_w.jpg) (https://www.flickr.com/gp/158435722@N02/5qG1oB)IMG_4752 (https://www.flickr.com/gp/158435722@N02/5qG1oB) by Mike Allridge (https://www.flickr.com/photos/158435722@N02/), on Flickr
Not he best log but osage is not easy to come by for me so its like gold. I wish the timing was different but this stuff needs processed. With the rain last night I'll have time today to get the last quarter split up and sealed. Then I can worry about bark and sap wood removal. In the pic I still had the strap on the log that was still hooked to my truck just in case it started to roll down hill, it was too heavy for me to roll by hand.   
 
             
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: chamookman on July 03, 2022, 04:43:43 am
Used to spend a week-ten Days in Mid-August at Harbor Beach trolling for Salmon. Many a time the Boat would be loaded with resting Monarchs, taking a break after crossing the Lake ! Bob
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on July 04, 2022, 08:33:28 am
That bug looks familiar Buckskinner but I donít remember for sure what it is. Iím hoping itís some kind of predator bug eating unwanted bugs. If the numbers are high it probably means the unwanted pest numbers are high to. Thatís what our ash trees look like to. Except most have fallen over and are laying in every direction making a walk through the woods very challenging.

Nice looking cob of sweet corn Mike. Mine is looking pretty nice now but itís barely knee high yet. Itís to the stage it will really grow now though. Probably be ready around fair week. Sweet corn and blueberries. Good stuff. Blueberry is definitely way high up on my list of favorites.

Be watching to see what you get from that Osage log.

Bob Iíve only seen them in my ash tree by the hundreds of thousands that one year. I have seen lots of them before, but that time they were literally hanging from each other and you couldnít have fit another one on the surface of the ash trees. They hung around like that for a couple days. We had a sugar beet test plot for Sugar beet Advancement that year and the fella that always checked on the test plot called me up very excited. Asked me if I saw all the butterflies? I told him I did and it was one of the memories I still have etched in my brain forever.

Once again ďI was outstanding in my field ď .  This time one of my wheat fields. Always hard to guess what itís going to do. This spot looks good yet. Sure could have used some rain but maybe we can still have a decent crop. Wheat makes me very nervous this time of year. I donít stop worrying until itís at the elevator and has passed the vomitoxin and falling numbers test. We have a lot of money invested in this crop and itís gotta be milling quality or we lose.

Happy 4th of July everyone. I plan on spending the day at our beach with family and friends. Thanks to all who have made it possible for us to enjoy this freedom.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: chamookman on July 05, 2022, 04:45:39 am
Raining pretty good here rite now - hope Your getting some it ! Bob
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: Buckskinner on July 05, 2022, 07:53:35 am
Hope you got some rain BJ, we finally did yesterday and through the night.  Came along perfect as well, started with a nice slow rain of about 1/4" to soften ground then good thunderstorms at night, probably close to 2".
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on July 05, 2022, 11:13:14 am
Thanks for the wishes guys. We got between 1/10th and 2/10ths. Really could have taken ten times that but it buys a little time. The beans should like it. And everything else will be glad to get it to.

I was walking the beach last night and came across this digging.

What could it be?

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on July 05, 2022, 11:15:47 am
It could be my favorite granddaughter and my grandson. Love watching them dig in the sand.

Bjrogg
Title: Re: Life on the Farm
Post by: bjrogg on July 05, 2022, 11:18:42 am
Your right Buckskinner. Those critters are everywhere.

Also lots of beeís

And a few of these.

Bjrogg