Author Topic: Fishing arrows  (Read 15564 times)

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Offline jturner

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Fishing arrows
« on: May 16, 2007, 02:49:42 am »
Anyone make theese? I make my arrows out of rose and I know they wont work for fishing, but I have some ash and walnut that would make a heavy arrow. Also wondering about bone for fishing tips, if anyone has tried this it would help before I get started.


                                                                        jake


                                                                                         
Jake Turner     Michigan

Offline NorthernArcher

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    • Alberta Traditional Bowhunters Association
Re: Fishing arrows
« Reply #1 on: May 18, 2007, 10:21:06 pm »
I too have been thinking about making fishing arrows, but I was considering using cane or bamboo.  These come in sufficient weights and lengths, and are generally more water resistant than wood shafts.  As far as the points go, I have seen some awesome barbed bone fishing points, both online and in museume displays.  As soon as I get the time, I am going to try carving some bone points.  As far as fletchings go, I would think that they aren't entirely necessary.  Modern fishing arrows don't have feathers, so I would think that an extra long, heavy, cane fishing arrow wouldn't need fletching either, especially if it is being shot into the water.  Also, for primitive bowfishing, what would be used for a line?  Or is a line even necessary?  I suppose it depends on where you are doing your fishing.  In some places a line might be needed, while in others it might not.  I know Don Thomas goes bowfishing without a line in shallow water.

Just my thoughts on the matter.  I have yet to actually attemp any of this.
"We do not inherit the earth from our ancestors, we borrow it from our children."

Offline Pat B

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Re: Fishing arrows
« Reply #2 on: May 19, 2007, 01:07:05 am »
I have a primitive fishing arrow that Jamie made me a few years ago. I'll post pics tomorrow.    Pat
Make the most of all that comes and the least of all that goes!    Pat Brennan  Brevard, NC

Offline Pat B

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Re: Fishing arrows
« Reply #3 on: May 19, 2007, 12:09:33 pm »
This is the fishing arrow Jamie sent me in 2003.  Bone head set with pitch and sinew wrapped with a tied on 2 fletch.    Pat

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Make the most of all that comes and the least of all that goes!    Pat Brennan  Brevard, NC

Offline DanaM

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Re: Fishing arrows
« Reply #4 on: May 19, 2007, 12:25:02 pm »
Nice arra Pat, It doesn't look used though :-\
I would think a heavy arra oak or ash maybe would work fine without fletching, I know I've
shot a carp past 5 yards. Seal the shaft well with Spar Varnish or bear grease, wax what have you.
For a durable point I believe a nice barbed one could be made out of bandsaw stock or such.

DanaM
"Prosperity is a way of living and thinking, and not just money or things. Poverty is a way of living and thinking, and not just a lack of money or things."

Manistique, MI

Offline Pat B

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Re: Fishing arrows
« Reply #5 on: May 19, 2007, 12:30:25 pm »
Dana, This arrow hangs on the wall with the rest of my collection.  ;)  Too neat to use.   Pat
Make the most of all that comes and the least of all that goes!    Pat Brennan  Brevard, NC

Trapper

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Re: Fishing arrows
« Reply #6 on: May 19, 2007, 06:27:39 pm »
I had the pleasure of working on some Creek rivercane arrows that they used in the river for fishing, they used walnut hulls to stun the fish then they would shoot them and retreive there arrows and fish , if they missed there arrow would be standing up in the water, cause the ones I worked on had roled cone points , looked like they were rolled out of barrel bands.    Trapper

SteveO

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Re: Fishing arrows
« Reply #7 on: May 25, 2007, 02:56:34 pm »
 There are lots of different ways of bowfishing. The size of your expected targets as well as the way you get close to them, and the size of the body of water they inhabit all are factors which figure in.

 My preferred targets are large (20-30 pound) fish which I shoot from the front deck of my boat, usually in the Lake of the Ozarks or Truman Lake, but sometimes in the local rivers.

 If you don't have a line on your arrow under those circumstances, you won't recover your fish. If you try to hold one of those fish, especially grass carp or buffalo, during the initial run they make after being shot, they often will tear the barb out and get away. I have even had them get off after a complete pass through shot, where the line itself had cut through the fish all the way to the outside.

 I decided the Eskimos must have had a year or two to figure out how to take large animals from the water, so I copied the technique they developed. I make a socketed head which only slips onto a cane shaft. I tie a line to the head and secure the line at the back of the shaft with two half hitches. The other end of the 50 or so feet of line is tied to a milk jug.  I can place the jug at my feet, wrap the line around my bow reel, and when I shoot a fish, it can run until it tires enough to be gaffed. The cane shaft floats if it comes loose.

 This method sure isn't for everybody or for all kinds of bowfishing but does have advantages under some circumstances.

  Steve

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Dustybaer

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Re: Fishing arrows
« Reply #8 on: May 26, 2007, 04:25:16 am »
that's some neat stuff, you guys are posting.  keep it coming   ;D

Offline DanaM

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Re: Fishing arrows
« Reply #9 on: May 26, 2007, 06:31:59 am »
I like that rig great idea with the bouy, looks like a wicked point

Dana
"Prosperity is a way of living and thinking, and not just money or things. Poverty is a way of living and thinking, and not just a lack of money or things."

Manistique, MI

Dustybaer

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Re: Fishing arrows
« Reply #10 on: May 26, 2007, 07:46:02 am »
steveo, i wanted to show your arrow to my friends in germany, so i copied your pictures.  i hope you don't mind.  if you do, i'll remove them immediately.

SteveO

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Re: Fishing arrows
« Reply #11 on: May 26, 2007, 10:01:39 am »
 That's what they are for, Dustybaer, so share with anyone you like.

 That head is just a 30-06 case cut off at the shoulder with a hole drilled through the primer channel big  enough to insert a large nail through the hole. The nail head stops it from going all the way through. The point of the nail can then be flattened a little so you can cut a slot in it lengthwise near the tip for insertion of the point. I have a wire welder which I use to weld the point to the nail but solder would maybe hold if you don't shoot the bottom too much. After the point is welded, I solder the nail head to the case, since the welding can get the whole nail hot enough to loosen solder if you don't cool it off periodically. I just find it easier to do that step last.

 Steve

Offline Justin Snyder

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Re: Fishing arrows
« Reply #12 on: May 26, 2007, 10:55:06 am »
Those are some pretty cool points guys.  I guess you can tell why traditional bowhunters have always been survivors.  They will always come up with ideas and make the tools to survive.  Justin
Everything happens for a reason, sometimes the reason is you made a bad decision.


SW Utah