Author Topic: Southern Plains Arrow w/ Stone Tip  (Read 3000 times)

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Offline jackcrafty

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Southern Plains Arrow w/ Stone Tip
« on: December 29, 2010, 11:02:04 am »
Made this for a friend but I took pictures before I sent it. The arrow is based on a Comanche arrow that I saw on the AMNH website.

Materials:

Shaft - Chinese Privet  (Looks a lot like Texas Yaupon Holly)
Foreshaft - Osage
Arrowhead - Texas Pedernales Chert
Paint - Fish Glue with Food Coloring
Turkey Wing Fletching (attached with sinew and not glued down in middle)
Pine Pitch Glue (for arrowhead)
Deer Sinew










« Last Edit: December 29, 2010, 11:08:21 am by jackcrafty »
Any critter tastes good with enough butter on it. :::.

Patrick Blank
Midland, Texas
AllergicHobbit (youtube)

Where's the Rock?  Public Waterways, Road Cuts, Landscape Supply, Knap-Ins.
How Do I Cook It?  Light Colors:  200deg for 24hrs, 400deg for 4hrs, Cool for 12hrs.

PN500445

Offline Sparrow

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Re: Southern Plains Arrow w/ Stone Tip
« Reply #1 on: December 29, 2010, 11:51:25 am »
Oh that is just a beauty.Like everything about it. Really nice working point there. How long is it ? '  Frank
Frank (The Sparrow) Pataha, Washington

Offline jackcrafty

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Re: Southern Plains Arrow w/ Stone Tip
« Reply #2 on: December 29, 2010, 12:06:22 pm »
Not sure... I think it's about 28" overall.  The foreshaft is about 5" long.  It is designed for a short-draw, plains bow.  The arrow was not drawn to the arrowhead.  It was drawn to the base of the foreshaft.
Any critter tastes good with enough butter on it. :::.

Patrick Blank
Midland, Texas
AllergicHobbit (youtube)

Where's the Rock?  Public Waterways, Road Cuts, Landscape Supply, Knap-Ins.
How Do I Cook It?  Light Colors:  200deg for 24hrs, 400deg for 4hrs, Cool for 12hrs.

PN500445

Offline Pat B

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Re: Southern Plains Arrow w/ Stone Tip
« Reply #3 on: December 29, 2010, 12:53:20 pm »
Cool and authentic Patrick. I know the Comanche would have used privet if they had it.  ;)
Make the most of all that comes and the least of all that goes!    Pat Brennan  Brevard, NC

Offline jackcrafty

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Re: Southern Plains Arrow w/ Stone Tip
« Reply #4 on: December 29, 2010, 02:21:12 pm »
Thanks Pat.  I don't feel guilty at all using the privet.  The fact that it's an invasive species is icing on the cake.   :)
Any critter tastes good with enough butter on it. :::.

Patrick Blank
Midland, Texas
AllergicHobbit (youtube)

Where's the Rock?  Public Waterways, Road Cuts, Landscape Supply, Knap-Ins.
How Do I Cook It?  Light Colors:  200deg for 24hrs, 400deg for 4hrs, Cool for 12hrs.

PN500445

Offline half eye

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Re: Southern Plains Arrow w/ Stone Tip
« Reply #5 on: December 29, 2010, 04:18:06 pm »
Now that's an arrow.......very nice.
rich

Offline Traxx

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Re: Southern Plains Arrow w/ Stone Tip
« Reply #6 on: December 29, 2010, 04:48:16 pm »
A question about the nocks...
Were they whittled down from a larger diameter shaft,or were they spread apart,in some fashion afterward?

Offline jackcrafty

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Re: Southern Plains Arrow w/ Stone Tip
« Reply #7 on: December 30, 2010, 08:17:18 am »
Traxx, the nock is carved.  The thick end of the shoot became the nock.  I drilled a socket on the thinner end for the foreshaft.

I don't think very many plains arrow nocks were spread apart by cutting a slot and then bending the wood to form the "Y" shape.
Any critter tastes good with enough butter on it. :::.

Patrick Blank
Midland, Texas
AllergicHobbit (youtube)

Where's the Rock?  Public Waterways, Road Cuts, Landscape Supply, Knap-Ins.
How Do I Cook It?  Light Colors:  200deg for 24hrs, 400deg for 4hrs, Cool for 12hrs.

PN500445

Offline medicinewheel

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Re: Southern Plains Arrow w/ Stone Tip
« Reply #8 on: December 30, 2010, 03:59:25 pm »
COOL!
Frank from Germany...

Offline cracker

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Re: Southern Plains Arrow w/ Stone Tip
« Reply #9 on: December 31, 2010, 03:20:58 am »
Dang fine lookin arrow.
If we can't help each other what is the point of being here?

Offline Little John

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Re: Southern Plains Arrow w/ Stone Tip
« Reply #10 on: December 31, 2010, 07:16:15 am »
Patric, you alwways do the most awsome primitive work. Beautiful job there.     Kenneth
May all of your moments afield with bow in hand please and satisfy you.

Offline TRACY

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Re: Southern Plains Arrow w/ Stone Tip
« Reply #11 on: December 31, 2010, 07:17:55 am »
Awesome arrow and point Patrick! Looks like a real meat maker to me

Tracy
It is what it is - make the most of it!    PN500956

Offline Wolf Watcher

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Re: Southern Plains Arrow w/ Stone Tip
« Reply #12 on: December 31, 2010, 07:50:05 am »
Mr. "Crafty" Beautiful arrow!  This will demonstrate my ignorance, but I am confused about the length of the arrows used to shoot buffalo with a short draw bow off horse back!  It seems a short arrow would be the best, but the ones on display at the local museum are quite long.  I know that the Indians used a very long arrow with very small points to shoot buffalo at the bottom of buffalo jumps.  Several of those types have been found in Montana and Wyoming.  I am planning on making a plains style quiver and need to know about arrow length before I can start.  Are you going to this years's classic?  Thanks for the help!  A/Ho Pokie
Get Close---Shoot Straight

Offline mullet

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Re: Southern Plains Arrow w/ Stone Tip
« Reply #13 on: December 31, 2010, 10:44:56 am »
 Patrick, that is truely a work of art. Your arrows are museum quality, the detail amazing.
Lakeland, Florida
 If you have to pull the trigger, is it really archery?

Offline jackcrafty

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Re: Southern Plains Arrow w/ Stone Tip
« Reply #14 on: December 31, 2010, 11:15:45 am »
Thanks so much for the compliments guys!

Wolf Watcher, I'm honored that you think I can answer that very difficult question!  I'll give it a try.

The long arrows you speak of are probably "composite" arrows with a long foreshaft and a stone point.  This style was used everywhere west of the Mississippi before European contact.  In many ways, they resembled the earlier atlatl dart.  East of the Mississippi, arrows tended to be made in one piece, also quite long.

After iron trade points became available, the foreshaft and stone point combination was discarded and the trade point was attached in its place.  The draw lengths remained the same.

There is a lot of debate about how the buffalo was hunted. Personally, I think the majority were killed after being disabled, tired, or in a confused state.  The technique of riding along side a buffalo and shooting it from horseback was probably reserved for the most skilled warriors/hunters who didn't care abut the risk of death (very few).

Anyway, if you want to make a plains quiver, decide if you want to make "pre-contact" arrows (with foreshafts and stone points) or arrows with trade points.  Then make your quiver long enough to hold the arrows with maybe a half inch of the arrow sticking out the top.

When you see a short arrow with a stone point, I believe you are looking at a "tourist" arrow.  It's just my opinion, but I think a foreshaft was used on the vast majority of hunting/war arrows that had stone points, especially if the arrowhead did not have a stem.

Hope that answers your question.   :)

Oh yeah... yes, I plan on going to the classic.
« Last Edit: December 31, 2010, 12:13:20 pm by jackcrafty »
Any critter tastes good with enough butter on it. :::.

Patrick Blank
Midland, Texas
AllergicHobbit (youtube)

Where's the Rock?  Public Waterways, Road Cuts, Landscape Supply, Knap-Ins.
How Do I Cook It?  Light Colors:  200deg for 24hrs, 400deg for 4hrs, Cool for 12hrs.

PN500445