Author Topic: Another historical question  (Read 12119 times)

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Offline adb

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Re: Another historical question
« Reply #15 on: September 11, 2009, 10:05:05 am »
After all, a medieval bowyer's apprenticeship was 7 years. These things were not just cranked out, but made by skilled craftsman, who obviously learned a thing or two along the way.

Rod

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Re: Another historical question
« Reply #16 on: September 14, 2009, 06:56:12 am »
As Dave says, except that it is not a question of it being Italian or English yew (or Baltic or Spanish or American).
It is a matter of density and ring count.

Bear in mind that livery bows would have been made very quickly by (mostly) very skilled craftsmen.
It was neither economical, practical or even necessary to attempt to precisely follow one back ring on very fine and dense yew.

Steve makes too much of Italian yew, except that he is trying to replicate the probable source of the MR staves.
And like good Oregon yew they come from a location where one is more likely to find the right quality in reasonable quantity.
(And that he likes to promote it as a USP for his self bows).

With yew that is coarse enough in ring count that it is practical, one can follow a back ring, but with very fine ringed staves it is not necessary, indeed it can be highly impractical.
As long as the general line is followed and no radical deparures made, it should not be a problem.

And very fine English yew does exist, it is just not at all common.

Rod.
Obviously the is "In your humble opinion"!

Obviously. 

Rod.
« Last Edit: September 14, 2009, 07:00:59 am by Rod »

Rod

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Re: Another historical question
« Reply #17 on: September 14, 2009, 07:00:09 am »
"Yewboy", I think we'd all be interested to know who you are.

I will admit to being curious, but not particularly bothered.
I am more likely to respect comment when it chooses not to hide behind a pseudonym.
Rod.

Offline bow-toxo

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Re: Another historical question
« Reply #18 on: November 08, 2009, 12:07:28 pm »
 The different properties of yew sapwood and heartwood are better used when kept in a proportion of thicker heartwood than sapwood. If you "chase a ring", the sapwood at the tips is too thick for the best springiness. I have always kept the proportion of 1/4 to 1/3 sapwood and had no problem.

Offline Ian.

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Re: Another historical question
« Reply #19 on: November 08, 2009, 12:22:58 pm »
The different properties of yew sapwood and heartwood are better used when kept in a proportion of thicker heartwood than sapwood. If you "chase a ring", the sapwood at the tips is too thick for the best springiness. I have always kept the proportion of 1/4 to 1/3 sapwood and had no problem.

So you wouldn't leave one chased growth ring on the back of a bow
ALways happy to help anyone get into heavy weight archery: https://www.facebook.com/bostonwarbowsbows/

Offline bow-toxo

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Re: Another historical question
« Reply #20 on: November 08, 2009, 06:16:18 pm »
Quote from: Ian. link=topic=14641.msg218647#msg218647 date=1257694426-

So you wouldn't leave one chased growth ring on the back of a bow
[/quote

 No.  Not on a yew bow.

Offline Davepim

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Re: Another historical question
« Reply #21 on: November 09, 2009, 04:41:04 am »
I have made a self-yew bow with no sapwood at all and it has no problems!

Cheers, Dave