Author Topic: Sinew  (Read 24799 times)

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Offline Primitive1

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Re: Sinew
« Reply #15 on: July 28, 2006, 12:38:55 pm »
Use caution in pounding the sinew.  I actually use an old carving mallet (basically a cylinder of dense wood) and an flattened egg shaped smooth rock.  If you use a hammer (steel), or too much force in your pounding, you can actually sever the fibers and waste a lot of material and time.
Sinew is used for nock and point reinforcement and fletching support on arrows; it can and is also used to reinforce suspect areas on a bow.  Sinew, when applied to the back of a bow can induce a reflex or hold the shape of a heat bent bow.  I have recently sinewed a California type bow and tied a clothes line from nock to nock in reverse bend.  I put a rat tail file handle through the center of the rope and twisted to impart more reflex as the sinew cured.  I would call this a primitive 'Perry' reflex.  I also used sinew to wrap the 'break' nocks at the end.  I use sinew exclusively now on my arrow fletching since other man made threads are brittle and have broken on many occasions during use.  Sinew is the only material that stands up to being bounced off a rock, tree or whatever...it's one tough customer.  I typically cover sinew (after it's completely cured) with rawhide or snakeskin to improve water resistance.  I cover that with melted paraffin wax for a finish and clean everything up with pledge after a days shoot.  Sinew is tough, requires time and patience to work, lasts a long-long time and is completely natural...what more could anyone ask for? ;D
When you have eliminated all which is impossible, then whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.
Cedar Hill, MO

Offline billy

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Re: Sinew
« Reply #16 on: August 07, 2006, 11:19:46 pm »
Primitive,

Post a pic of that CA bow...I'd like to see it. 

Cody,

What kind of sinew do you have?  Is it back sinew (a thin, flat sheet) or is it leg sinew (round)?
Marietta, Georgia

Offline Primitive1

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Re: Sinew
« Reply #17 on: August 08, 2006, 11:45:45 am »
Will do but it might be a few days...have to work a whole camera roll down and get it developed.  No big deal, I figured I take a bunch of shots of my work area and some of the other projects I'm working on.  I have one picture of my "W" or 'orc' bow as I like to call it within the MOJAM subject.  This one has purple dyed sinew back that I just repaired and waiting to cure...  I have some of my arrows with the coffee dyed sinew fletching work in the arrows area under heat tempering circular saw blades or horn/antler nock question.  Cheers, Craig.
When you have eliminated all which is impossible, then whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.
Cedar Hill, MO

Offline yellow feather

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Re: Sinew
« Reply #18 on: April 12, 2007, 04:20:13 pm »
I would like to know if the caseing is also used? I just tried pounding my first deer leg sinew and it all looks the same, with the center a little harder to seperate and what is the smallest you would strip the strands.
San Angelo, Texas

Offline D. Tiller

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Re: Sinew
« Reply #19 on: April 12, 2007, 06:29:08 pm »
keep pounding and pulling apart! It takes a lot of work to pound sinew and get the threads seperrated out. The casing will look, hmmm, like paper that will come off of the threads with a bit of work.

David T
“People are less likely to shoot at you if you smile at them” - Mad Jack Churchill

Offline yellow feather

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Re: Sinew
« Reply #20 on: April 13, 2007, 04:34:17 pm »
If it turns into strands I guess you can use it then.
                                  David
San Angelo, Texas