Author Topic: Pine pitch question  (Read 5185 times)

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Offline swamp monkey

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Pine pitch question
« on: July 03, 2014, 11:06:37 pm »
Anyone ever experiment with different pine species for making pitch?  I wonder if all pine species are created equal?

Offline lostarrow

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Re: Pine pitch question
« Reply #1 on: July 23, 2014, 10:46:04 am »
I've used red and white and they seem the same. No scientific testing, just casual observation. Pitch from other trees are very different though. Spruce seems to be softer and more gooey, sticky. Balsam as we'll . Cherry just goes like sponge toffee when heated . No structure, but smells wonderful! I'll try to pay more attention from now on . Thanks for planting the seed. Sometimes you just need to hear the question .

Offline JackCrafty

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Re: Pine pitch question
« Reply #2 on: July 23, 2014, 10:58:39 am »
I've tried Eastern White, Western White, Ponderosa, Longleaf, and Loblolly.  All very similar when melted and processed.  The colors are slightly different, but the color can be different within the same species too.
Any critter tastes good with enough butter on it.

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Offline Dharma

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Re: Pine pitch question
« Reply #3 on: August 19, 2014, 11:21:02 am »
Pinyon pine sap works great! That's what was traditionally used here. It also smells great and makes a great medicine for dry, cracked skins and minor cuts, burns, and wounds.
An arrow knows only the life its maker breathes into it...

Offline mullet

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Re: Pine pitch question
« Reply #4 on: August 19, 2014, 01:17:11 pm »
I've only used Longleaf pine. Tried grapefruit but it stays like putty.
Lakeland, Florida
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Offline Pat B

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Re: Pine pitch question
« Reply #5 on: August 19, 2014, 04:50:20 pm »
I've used different types and it all seems to work the same. There is  slight difference in smell with incent grade pinion pine smelling the best. I got some in trade a few years ago.
Make the most of all that comes and the least of all that goes!    Pat Brennan  Brevard, NC

Offline swamp monkey

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Re: Pine pitch question
« Reply #6 on: August 23, 2014, 11:32:28 am »
I collected sap from white pine, jack pine, short leaf pine and some kind of fir.  Each was different in consistency but the resulting pitch seemed just fine.

Offline Billinthedesert

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Re: Pine pitch question
« Reply #7 on: September 08, 2014, 07:58:15 pm »
I've pretty much stuck with ponderosa, as we have so much of it here in the Oregon high desert. Are you folks melting, screening and mixing with powdered charcoal? If not, how are you processing your pitch?

Offline swamp monkey

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Re: Pine pitch question
« Reply #8 on: September 09, 2014, 04:57:30 pm »
Bill,  I cooked it until it melted then added ground charcoal and ground elk dung.

Offline Billinthedesert

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Re: Pine pitch question
« Reply #9 on: September 09, 2014, 07:45:21 pm »
Ground elk poop. I knew I was forgetting a key ingredient. Actually, I can collect mule deer pellets right in my yard ...

 ;)

Offline Chippintuff

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Re: Pine pitch question
« Reply #10 on: November 09, 2014, 04:20:53 pm »
I tried the sticky juice of osage oranges/horse apples and it cooked down to gravy, not even sticky.

WA