Author Topic: New hunting land  (Read 2095 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline TrevorM

  • Member
  • Posts: 176
New hunting land
« on: September 24, 2019, 09:01:14 am »
I'm buying a little hunting land. This is the first time we've had any land like this so I'm looking for some advice. There's a main trail about 1/3 of the way in to a cabin area and it doesn't look like it'll be to hard to clear at least a few trails around. With hunting season starting right after we close, is it worth trying to put in green fields or would you just look for a game trail and work that? Do you guys have any other do/don't advice, things to look out for etc?
Trevor

Offline Pat B

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • Posts: 34,534
Re: New hunting land
« Reply #1 on: September 24, 2019, 09:36:21 am »
First off where is your land located and what is the vegetation on it?
 I think it's too late this year to plant a green field. You could start prepping the areas you plan to make into food plots by reducing the brush and turning the soil. Sometimes this will attract deer. I'd do a soil test(check with county agent or county ag dept about soil test) so you will know what the soil may need as far as lime and other nutrients. Most places east of the Mississippi need lime so you could add lime now. It takes a few months for it to become available but do this after the soil test. Fine other food sources like acorns, persimmons, grapes, wild apples or crab apples and hunt near them but not necessarily right over them. Find deer trails and set up stands near pinch points or just off heavily used trails. Know the wind in your area. A wrong wind will give you away quicker than anything else.
 If you have a stand that is near a clearing you could broadcast soy beans or iron clay peas that will germinate in a week or two if you have good moisture. Check with local game laws about baiting. If you plant the peas/beans like normal agricultural practices it is not considered baiting in some areas. As soon as these beans/peas germinate the deer will mow them down so you'll only have a short window to hunt.
 In dry areas look for water.
Make the most of all that comes and the least of all that goes!    Pat Brennan  Brevard, NC

Offline TrevorM

  • Member
  • Posts: 176
Re: New hunting land
« Reply #2 on: September 24, 2019, 11:06:45 am »
Thanks Pat! It's located near Montgomery AL. I haven't seen all of it, but it seems to be quite a mix of natural growth trees some of it was quite thick. Not sure about any fruit, but acorns are a certain. It flows down hill to a creak in one corner. I've not seen the creak yet, but I was told it's year round so it might be an option. The soil test's a great idea, it's ~40 acres so would one test cover it all or would I need a couple? I'm not sure about peas/beans being considered bait, but I do know that this year I can pay $15 to hunt over bait. Getting the bait permit might be a good idea either way just to play it safe.
Trevor

Offline Pat B

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • Posts: 34,534
Re: New hunting land
« Reply #3 on: September 24, 2019, 12:01:21 pm »
Find where you want food plots and use a clean plastic bucket and dig a little soil from different locations around the future food plot. Mix the soil in the bucket well and get your soil sample from the bucket.
 The real thick areas will be bedding areas so I'd leave them along and not disturb them. Find trails coming from the thick area(s) to the creek and to your future food plots and set your stands near but not on the trails. Even when you have food plots don't hunt on them but trails coming to them.
 After hunting season is a real good time to get to know your new land. The winter deer patterns after the season is similar to during the hunting season so you can really study those patterns then without spooking the deer. Look for scrapes and scrape and rub lines. Shed hunting in the winter is fun and will help you learn the property plus it will help you with the quality of the bucks in your area. Find the bedding areas for future reference. Deer require food and security. Make sure they get those things and you'll have plenty of deer to possibly harvest.
 Talk top Eric Krewson(PA member). He lives in Alabama and is very knowledgeable about deer and deer hunting and setting up food plots.
 I never liked baiting as per spreading corn, etc. Deer get real nervous comping in to bait and baiting helps to spread diseases that can be harmful to the heard.
Make the most of all that comes and the least of all that goes!    Pat Brennan  Brevard, NC

Offline TrevorM

  • Member
  • Posts: 176
Re: New hunting land
« Reply #4 on: September 24, 2019, 12:48:16 pm »
Gotcha. Yeah we'll definitely still be exploring after the season's up, we all love to hike and bike. I have a nicely aged stave that I'll hopefully have somewhere on work on it now too. Thanks again Pat!
Trevor

Offline bjrogg

  • Member
  • Posts: 7,982
  • Cedar Pond
Re: New hunting land
« Reply #5 on: September 25, 2019, 06:36:42 am »
Congratulations. I'm so happy for you. Enjoy your property and take good care of it.

I probably would just hunt trails this season. Scout your property good and find out where you really want your plots. Like Pat said when you know where you'd like them get some soil samples. I don't know what type crop to plant in your area. I live in Michigan and my uncle has a place further north of me. He has about fifteen acres cleared for food plots in his 40 acre woods. He always plants several different crops in about 3 acre plots. He likes to plant a little later than the farmers in his area. He usually plants alfalfa, soybeans, corn, sugarbeets, clover and also some of the deer plot mixs. I know some people might not like it but he likes round up ready crops. It makes it much easier for him to be successful with his plots and the deer don't seem to mind at all. He puts a lot of effort and considerable expense into his "farming ". He is a retired teacher from Detroit area and he really enjoys his farming now. Sometimes I think more than his hunting even. He usually buys any of my left over seed and I still have to get something for it. It's still useful to me. I give him a considerable break but it still adds up. He could probably go on a nice out of State hunt for the expense of his plots, but then he wouldn't have his joy of "farming "
Bjrogg
A hot cup of coffee and a beautiful sunrise

Offline TrevorM

  • Member
  • Posts: 176
Re: New hunting land
« Reply #6 on: September 25, 2019, 10:25:55 am »
Thanks Bjrogg! We live over an hour away so we'll only be there on weekends and when my kids are out of school so something fairly easy is definitely a plus. I don't think there are any large open areas at the moment so just scouting is probably what I'll do. Most things tend to grow really well here, sometimes a bit too well in fact. It can turn into jungle pretty quick :)  Is there type of corn deer prefer I can I just plant what I like? Feeding the family and the deer would be great. I'm planning on planting at least a few fruit trees around for the same reason.
Trevor

Offline bjrogg

  • Member
  • Posts: 7,982
  • Cedar Pond
Re: New hunting land
« Reply #7 on: September 25, 2019, 10:37:43 am »
I'm to busy to help you much right now Trevor. I'd like to talk more when I can. Short answer for now.
People like sweet corn. It's totally different than field corn that the animals like. Will chat more when I can
Bjrogg
A hot cup of coffee and a beautiful sunrise

Offline TrevorM

  • Member
  • Posts: 176
Re: New hunting land
« Reply #8 on: September 25, 2019, 10:48:21 am »
Yeah I half thought it was a different type. Oh no rush, we don't even close on the place for a few weeks. I appreciate all the help.
Trevor

Offline Pat B

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • Posts: 34,534
Re: New hunting land
« Reply #9 on: September 25, 2019, 11:06:28 am »
There are lots of crops to plant instead of corn for a food plot. Wheat, rye, oats, beets, radishes, kale, rape, clover(red, crimson and ladino) and others. I just planted grain rye, kale, radishes and beets in my small food plot. All I need now is rain. Clover is a legume and will fix nitrogen in the soil from the atmosphere. There are food plot blends you can get from big box stores. Ask your local DNR about suggestions and again contact Eric Krewson. He lives near Birmingham I think and is very knowledgeable about deer hunting, food plots, etc and is very generous with his info.
 I just rough up the ground and use a hand spreader to disperse the seeds then drag something over it to cover the seed. I use an old cyclone fence gate to drag behind my riding mower.
Another thing to add is salt licks. One or two locations on your 40ac. Buy a 50# livestock salt/mineral block from feed store or Tractor Supply and place it on the ground in an area where deer will feel safe. It will eventually melt into the ground but the deer will dig and eat the salty dirt. I usually put 2 out a year, in early spring when they use it most and mid summer. They and other critters will use the salt all year long.
Make the most of all that comes and the least of all that goes!    Pat Brennan  Brevard, NC

Offline TrevorM

  • Member
  • Posts: 176
Re: New hunting land
« Reply #10 on: September 25, 2019, 01:43:30 pm »
Oh yeah I know it's not just corn, I was just thinking if corn would work for feeding the deer and my family it'd be a win win. I've heard Alabama generally has high nitrogen soil, but Clover doesn't take much work and will regrow for several years so it may still be quite good. Yes I'll definitely contact the DNR and Eric. Thanks for mentioning the salt licks, I've seen them in the stores a lot but I wasn't sure how many or even if they were worth it.
Trevor