Author Topic: Hickory Question  (Read 805 times)

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Offline Scallorn

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Hickory Question
« on: May 19, 2017, 10:42:41 pm »
  I'm wondering how long hickory needs to dry. I know it depends on the moisture in the environment, but I'm just looking for a ballpark number. I live in NE Texas along the red river so humidity is moderate. Thanks

Offline Stick Bender

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Re: Hickory Question
« Reply #1 on: May 20, 2017, 02:45:14 am »
I was told when I started making hickory stave bows to ruff the bow down & let it sit on the wall for 2 months at 50% RH & that worked for me , but did another hickory bow with the same method & it seemed to still be a bit green so I let them set longer & I also hot box hickory now for a week after use a simple electric blanket as a hot box the one I'm working on this morning has been curing for over a year and hot boxed for a week, some times this bow making is hurry up & wait that's why I have 4 or 5 bows in the works at the same time so when one is setting I can work on another , hickory is a great bow wood when cured !
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Offline bushboy

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Re: Hickory Question
« Reply #2 on: May 20, 2017, 03:24:29 am »
From what I've seen,its best to have a stock pile!if you can have staves seasoned for at least a year debarked ,should be good to go.
Some like motorboats,I like kayaks,some like guns,I like bows,but not the wheelie type.

Offline PEARL DRUMS/PEARLY/PD/DRUMS

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Re: Hickory Question
« Reply #3 on: May 20, 2017, 05:57:10 am »
Rough it out to about 20-30% over finished dimensions and stand it straight up and down on an AC register. Give it a few months and it will be ready. I will flip them end for end weekly so its gets consistent air flow over the whole length of the stave. Works for me on any wood I've used.
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Offline Pat B

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Re: Hickory Question
« Reply #4 on: May 20, 2017, 08:59:16 am »
Hickory is slow to release moisture but if done like Pearlie suggests it should dry enough in a few months. If you have a hot box with a fan in it it should dry quicker.
Make the most of all that comes and the least of all that goes!    Pat Brennan  Brevard, NC

Offline BowEd

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Re: Hickory Question
« Reply #5 on: May 20, 2017, 10:09:11 am »
A cheapy version of a stove pipe with a light bulb will work too.Invert it every other day for evenining out the drying will hurry things up too.With a small low voltage fan.Just like drying clothes.If your in a hurry.
Using the weighing method to see when it quits losing mass weight.
BowEd
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Ed

Offline nakedfeet

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Re: Hickory Question
« Reply #6 on: May 20, 2017, 01:51:15 pm »
A cheapy version of a stove pipe with a light bulb will work too.Invert it every other day for evenining out the drying will hurry things up too.With a small low voltage fan.Just like drying clothes.If your in a hurry.
Using the weighing method to see when it quits losing mass weight.

WHYYY did I never think of that. That's an awesome improvised hot-box idea.

Offline DC

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Re: Hickory Question
« Reply #7 on: May 20, 2017, 02:43:00 pm »
If you make a lid for the top with about a 2" hole in it, with a scrap of wood you can control the air flow and heat in the box. I use one for drying arrows and a hundred watt bulb will get it up to 90 degrees with a 1" hole. You should always check the temperature in stuff like this, sometimes they can get too hot and cause checking.
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Offline BowEd

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Re: Hickory Question
« Reply #8 on: May 20, 2017, 03:11:21 pm »
Yes a analog thermomter is handy to have to keep things under check.100 degrees will dry things out in a hurry if roughed out to 3/4" thick in the limbs.In a hurry is at least 2 weeks yet though.Closer to 3 really.That's 24 hours a day all day.Last to leave will be the handle moisture if a stiff handle bow is desired.
BowEd
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Offline timmyd

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Re: Hickory Question
« Reply #9 on: May 20, 2017, 05:22:57 pm »
I don't work hickory without a drying box and moisture meter. Some claim to be able to tell but I guess I'm not that talented. I'm working a hickory blank now that I roughed out years ago. Pegged at 14%. Just leaving hickory sit for a period of time doesn't work.

Offline BowEd

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Re: Hickory Question
« Reply #10 on: May 20, 2017, 07:04:12 pm »
I usually leave it in a 50% humidity area at 75 to 80 degrees.When it quits losing weight for a 1/3 of the time it was losing weight it usually is around 8 or 9 % humidity and ready to be made into a bow.That process has worked for me on a roughed out bow.
BowEd
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Ed

Offline Eric

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Re: Hickory Question
« Reply #11 on: May 21, 2017, 07:16:24 am »
I'm partial to wood that's dried nice and slow. I prefer to rough a stave down to about 1 inch thick and let it sit for a few years indoors to fully season. But I don't make bows commercially, so I have the luxury of being able to wait.
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