Author Topic: Wear technology  (Read 22279 times)

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Offline Dakota Kid

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Re: Wear technology
« Reply #15 on: June 19, 2017, 08:40:33 pm »
Don't worry I won't get too crazy. It was just some new interesting info that I wanted to make sure I understood before I attempted to try.

If there is one thing I learned it's that every knapper has a method they prefer and they can vary greatly. That being said, I still enjoy trying a new approach when I learn one.
I have nothing but scorn for all weird ideas other than my own.
~Terrance McKenna

Offline nclonghunter

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Re: Wear technology
« Reply #16 on: June 20, 2017, 09:26:47 am »
I have not had the oppourtunity to talk with JP or anyone about the out of mass technique but I have learned what you are describing on my own. As an added point I have found the the mass side will reduce flatter by flaking the length of the form rather than straight in working both A and B side. This helps to keep length and width. From the no mass side the thin edge is your center line so you are forcing your flakes from the center across and under the opposite side large mass. In order to make the edge strong enough not to crush on the thin mass side it will need to be grinded some which can reduce width some. In short take flakes from the thin mass side into and across the form but the mass side take flakes long ways until thinned enough to go in and across. Hope that makes sense.
Thanks for starting this theead, I think good info will come from it.
There are no bad knappers, only bad flakes

Offline bowmo

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Re: Wear technology
« Reply #17 on: June 20, 2017, 09:29:04 am »
Switching from percussion to pressure isn't a hard and fast concept. More than anything it depends on your skill with pressure and the hardness of the stone. I routinely stop percussion way earlier than most and many other knappers seem to express surprise at that when knapping with me. If you can undercut most stacks, hinges, and thick spots with antler pressure why risk swinging at it more. That being said, I don't generally go for cracker thin as they don't look as usable to me.

Offline bowmo

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Re: Wear technology
« Reply #18 on: June 20, 2017, 09:53:36 am »
Here's an older ugly preform I pressured into a point the other day. After the first pic everything is pressure flaking. If the second flute had gone a little further like I planned it would be quite flat.






















« Last Edit: June 20, 2017, 10:16:31 am by bowmo »

Offline bowmo

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Re: Wear technology
« Reply #19 on: June 20, 2017, 10:05:30 am »









« Last Edit: June 20, 2017, 10:19:43 am by bowmo »

Offline iowabow

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Re: Wear technology
« Reply #20 on: June 20, 2017, 11:21:34 am »
Very happy to see these post keepem coming
(:::.) The ABO path is a new frontier to the past!

Offline nclonghunter

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Re: Wear technology
« Reply #21 on: June 21, 2017, 05:18:28 pm »
I used to go from percussion into pressure but I now have an intermediate step. After initial shaping and large reduction my next step is the indirect percussion. I can do specific thinning and removal with percise indirect percussion placement with isolated platforms. The third and final step is edge pressure flaking. After edge flaking I may return to some more indirect percussion using a fine tipped antler for specific ridge removal. To me, the measure of success is greatly dependant on the knappers ability to understand the rock he is working. They all have a style or technique that must be learned which is based on hardness, layering, type of grain and so on.

Any thoughts or opinions?
There are no bad knappers, only bad flakes

Offline iowabow

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Re: Wear technology
« Reply #22 on: June 21, 2017, 09:08:05 pm »
I used to go from percussion into pressure but I now have an intermediate step. After initial shaping and large reduction my next step is the indirect percussion. I can do specific thinning and removal with percise indirect percussion placement with isolated platforms. The third and final step is edge pressure flaking. After edge flaking I may return to some more indirect percussion using a fine tipped antler for specific ridge removal. To me, the measure of success is greatly dependant on the knappers ability to understand the rock he is working. They all have a style or technique that must be learned which is based on hardness, layering, type of grain and so on.

Any thoughts or opinions?
completely agree with ya on how a stone kinda speaks to you or you read the stone as you work a point. Some stones allow you to get away with X and another won't. I do need mix in more indirect. Once I did a blade with punch flaking but kinda moved to another direct but it should not be over looked...a lot of good can come from it.
(:::.) The ABO path is a new frontier to the past!

Offline JackCrafty

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Re: Wear technology
« Reply #23 on: August 27, 2018, 11:34:08 am »
After reading this thread, I watched one of my older abo videos and I think I use "into mass" strikes about 90% of the time.  It's an interesting idea ( into mass - out of mass).

Here's the video:
https://youtu.be/jcmBm_rfM1s
Any critter tastes good with enough butter on it.

Patrick Blank
Midland, Texas
Youtube: JackCrafty, Allergic Hobbit, Patrick Blank

Where's Rock? Public Waterways, Road Cuts, Landscape Supply, Knap-Ins.
How to Cook It?  200 for 24hrs then 275 to 500 for 4hrs (depending on type), Cool for 12hr

Offline Zuma

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Re: Wear technology
« Reply #24 on: August 30, 2018, 08:39:22 am »
Jack,Jack is it really you? >:D Lets see some good stuff!
Zuma
If you are a good detective the past is at your feet. The future belongs to Faith.

Offline JackCrafty

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Re: Wear technology
« Reply #25 on: August 31, 2018, 06:56:20 pm »
Yep, it's me.  Here's my latest.  2-part video Revilla arrowhead.  All abo.

https://youtu.be/QvEA_8LifNM
https://youtu.be/7EbuxfnM6cA
Any critter tastes good with enough butter on it.

Patrick Blank
Midland, Texas
Youtube: JackCrafty, Allergic Hobbit, Patrick Blank

Where's Rock? Public Waterways, Road Cuts, Landscape Supply, Knap-Ins.
How to Cook It?  200 for 24hrs then 275 to 500 for 4hrs (depending on type), Cool for 12hr

Offline Zuma

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Re: Wear technology
« Reply #26 on: September 07, 2018, 07:39:26 am »
 :) :)
Yep, it's me.  Here's my latest.  2-part video Revilla arrowhead.  All abo.

https://youtu.be/QvEA_8LifNM
https://youtu.be/7EbuxfnM6cA
:) :) :KN )P(
If you are a good detective the past is at your feet. The future belongs to Faith.