Author Topic: Question on my release  (Read 612 times)

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Offline JRFaulk

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Question on my release
« on: August 03, 2017, 06:15:53 pm »
I have been frustrated with my grouping for a while now.  I couldn't get a good grouping to save my life, despite trying to consistently pay attention to every detail of my shot cycle.  I was pretty sure it was my release, read all the forum posts concerning release issues, tried several things, but nothing was working.  Last week, while scanning for primitive archery videos on YouTube, I stumbled across Ryan Gill in one of his "Talking Primitive" sessions, and he said he shoots on the pads of his fingers.  I tried it and, (angelic choir singing) my grouping improved significantly.  However, a new problem arose.  Some of my arrows started coming off the bow upon draw, like I was a complete beginner.  I must admit to using carbon arrows with snap on locks, as my cane arrows are in drastic need of repair (working on new ones......).  Anywhooo, I am wondering if the problem could be caused by my string and serving being too tight in the snap on lock.  Anyone else ever had this problem?  Could it be something else?  Deer season is coming up fast, and I need to fix this!

Offline Pat B

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Re: Question on my release
« Reply #1 on: August 03, 2017, 07:08:10 pm »
Sounds like you're rolling the string as you draw and it's forcing the arrow to the left. Using your fingers like a rigid hook to draw will prevent this. Then just relax your hand and the arrow is on it's way.
 Instead of shooting groups, try one arrow at a time, shoot, retrieve, shoot, etc. Pick a spot on the target and shoot it. I believe when shooting groups each arrow added to the group detracts from your concentration on the "spot".
Make the most of all that comes and the least of all that goes!    Pat Brennan  Brevard, NC

Offline Wooden Spring

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Re: Question on my release
« Reply #2 on: August 04, 2017, 06:23:16 am »
When I am teaching a group how to shoot, one of the things that I notice is that a lot of folks tend to pluck the string like you would a guitar string. Try this... In one smooth motion with your release, bring your hand back and touch your ear. In conjunction with this, when you hold the bow, don't hold it like you would a mop or a baseball bat where you wrap all of your fingers around the handle, rather, make the "OK" sign with your hand, and only hold the bow with your thumb and index finger wrapped around the handle. When you shoot, at first, the bow is going to feel like it wants to jump out of your hand - this is normal, and the feeling will go away the more that you do it. What I tell my students is that it is like shooting a rifle accurately - the rifle is inherently accurate, but the more we wrap our bodies around the rifle and put our own muscle movement into it, it becomes less so. So, as with the rifle, so it is with the bow - the more of YOU that you can take out of the shooting process, the more accurate it will be, hence the "OK" style grip. The grip is called a "high-wrist" grip, and when I learned to use it, my scores went up dramatically!
"Everything that moves shall be food for you..." Genesis 9:3

Offline bjrogg

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Re: Question on my release
« Reply #3 on: August 04, 2017, 10:30:49 am »
All good advice. For me a deeper grip with a heavier bow is easiest release. I usually do like Pat says. I shoot one arrow at a time. It just takes a lot of variables out of the equation. I find that when people have a hard time keeping arrow on shelf or handle a deeper grip helps solve this. You need to twist the string just a little to keep the arrow on shelf or at very least not twist it the opposite direction. When I get to my anchor point and want to release, I relaxed my index finger and the rest follow. I don't try to open my fingers. I just relax them and the string does the rest. A lighter bow is actually a little trickier to get a smooth release than a heavier bow. Sometimes I tell people to stick their bow arm index finger pointed straight up. Then pretending it's a bow string grip it like you would a bow string. With forward pressure from bow arm relax your index finger on string arm. Most people find when they relax their index finger the others follow and the simulated string goes forward.
I also agree with Wooden Spring on bow arm grip. I use a very light grip and really only pressure is on a small area where my thumb and index finger meet from bow being pulled back against it
Bjrogg
« Last Edit: August 04, 2017, 10:34:24 am by bjrogg »
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Offline bradsmith2010

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Re: Question on my release
« Reply #4 on: August 10, 2017, 06:53:59 pm »
I am 63 and still working on my release,,
it takes alot of practice,,
shooting one arrow is good,, but
also practice up close and shoot 5 arrows at a time,, just working on release and form,,
then back to 1 arrow at a time the next day,,

it just takes alot of arrows and practice to get consistant,, and you cant lay off a month and then expect to be in top form,,,

you need to practice at least a little all the time,,


just shoot one bow,, so you you are only concentratiing on a few issues,,

your glove or tab and effect your release, so you need to stick to one,,

ok keep practicing, you will have it down by season,,,just dont freak out and over do the practicing,,,, (-S


Offline BowEd

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Re: Question on my release
« Reply #5 on: August 11, 2017, 05:51:39 am »
Many problems can come with how a person grips the handle for accuracy.Over controlling it gripping it too tight can cause problems of twist or torque and make an arm more fatigued then needed to be too.Making the same arrow fly good once then next time not so well.The advice above is spot on.
I shoot the high wrist way myself too.Gripping very lightly.Shooting only wooden shafts.Everyone can have an off day though so don't get too discouraged.It'll get better.
Beadman
You got to stand for something or you'll fall for anything.
Ed

Offline JRFaulk

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Re: Question on my release
« Reply #6 on: August 14, 2017, 05:49:14 pm »
Thanks everyone.  I appreciate each and every one who took the time to give advice.  I have gone through a variety of release types and bow gripping forms, only to come back to (basically) where I started.  I do believe that all the experimentation helped me to be more aware of the different aspects of shooting (release, bow grip, shoulder orientation, etc...), as well as what works best for me.  I'm a looong way from where I want to be, but...... further along than I was a month ago.  At least I know understand more of what I SHOULD be doing.  Now if only I could get it consistent!

Offline bradsmith2010

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Re: Question on my release
« Reply #7 on: August 15, 2017, 03:28:53 pm »
stop experiementing and stick with one thing through the season,,
next year you can try different things as you like,, (AT)  while you eating your venison,,

Offline JRFaulk

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Re: Question on my release
« Reply #8 on: August 24, 2017, 05:39:37 am »
Thanks Brad.  I have stopped experimenting, and am now just shooting (paying attention to form and release, of course!).  I try to shoot some for form, some for practice at random distances.  Last evening it seemed everything was starting to click, Can't wait to get home and shoot tonight!

Offline loon

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Re: Question on my release
« Reply #9 on: August 24, 2017, 03:29:31 pm »
The grip is called a "high-wrist" grip, and when I learned to use it, my scores went up dramatically!
High-wrist refers to having a straighter wrist than with low wrist, not to avoid torquing the bow or a loose grip.
Do you shoot bows with pistol grips? AFAIK, simple handle bows, or bendy bows with thin "handle" could be shot either with a low wrist where the whole grip presses into the hand across the palm when the bow is drawn, or where the bow handle presses into just the area near the web of the hand between the index and thumb (high wrist).
I do more of the former because that's how they teach Korean style archery, even if shooting with 3 fingers. But I think it's possible to be very accurate either way..

Offline JRFaulk

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Re: Question on my release
« Reply #10 on: August 27, 2017, 12:21:37 pm »
I guess I shoot with a "low wrist", because I get best results with my palm firmly in the handle belly.  I don't firmly grasp the bow, just let the pressure of the draw hold the bow in place.  I don't shoot pistol grip bows, could never get used to the feel of them, and are not very traditional in my mind.  Ultimately I would like to shoot very primitive styled bows with primitive technology type arrows, however I do not believe that primitive bows and arrows are an excuse for poorly made bows and arrows.  I do have a small shelf on the bow I am currently shooting, although I have shot off the hand in the past.  As I build more bows, I will probably go back to shooting off the hand.  I am using the shelf right now to eliminate another variable while I work on my accuracy, although I do move the top of my bow hand to the shelf.  A couple millimeters higher and I would be shooting off my hand.  Once I settled on a "shooting style" that works for me, my accuracy and consistency made a great leap forward.  Now if I could just get that instinctive distance measurer/elevation compensator in my brain to adjust for variable distances!  I think I need to fine tune my brace height, as I almost always slap my wrist guard on release.  Maybe not much of a slap, but a slap none the less.  My brace height is at my fist mele;  my understanding is wood bows don't need the high brace heights that fiberglass bows usually use, and that it could permanently affect cast if used over a long period.  I do turn my bow arm elbow out before I draw.  I stand perpendicular to the target when I shoot. If I could eliminate that string slap, I would be comfortable with the style I am using now.  Any ideas would be welcome!