Author Topic: shooting heavy spined arrows  (Read 394 times)

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Offline jayman448

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shooting heavy spined arrows
« on: August 27, 2017, 07:57:58 pm »
if i understand the concept of archers paradox, shooting a heavy spined arrow should send them off to the left (as i am a right handed shooter). however when i shoot my 60# arrows from my 45# bow they tend to scatter. i know its not me as i can consistently shoot my matched flu flu and hit whatever i want. can someone explain this to me?

Offline Pappy

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Re: shooting heavy spined arrows
« Reply #1 on: August 28, 2017, 04:40:21 am »
They will go off to the right , right out of the bow but will do all kinds of crazy stuff after they clear the bow, same with to light splined arrows.  :)
 Pappy
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Offline aaron

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Re: shooting heavy spined arrows
« Reply #2 on: August 28, 2017, 11:43:07 am »
I think pappys got it backward. An arrow thats a little stiff would go left. An arrow thats very stiff will be very unpredictable. Only when you shoot proper arrows will you know if its you or the arrows
Ilwaco, Washington, USA
"Good wood makes great bows, but bad wood makes great bowyers"

Offline PEARLY

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Re: shooting heavy spined arrows
« Reply #3 on: August 28, 2017, 12:09:49 pm »
If you cant get the correct spine, leave them full length and add weight until it impacts straight and accurately.

Flu flu arrows will all fly nice, even 20-30# too heavy. They drag the back down so quickly that you will never see it. My flu flu arrows are 65-70 spine and they shoot from my 45-50# bows great.

Only when the last tree has died and the last river has been poisoned and the last fish has been caught will we realize we cannot eat money.

Offline nclonghunter

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Re: shooting heavy spined arrows
« Reply #4 on: August 28, 2017, 05:08:36 pm »
Just my 2 cents....Not sure why you are shooting 60# shafts out of 45# bow unless you are trying to get a heavy arrow or just experimenting. The lack of bending or paradox on an extreme over spine arrow would make the arrow have more contact with the bow during the shot. It will not bend around the bow as it should. Any bow hand movement will cause the arrows to fly differently to extremes. If you are after heavy arrows then you need to put a lot of weight on the tip to change the spine. Not sure how much is needed but a few hundred grains I would suspect. Always fun to test new combinations. Dr. Ashby has some great info on heavy FOC. Good Luck
There are no bad knappers, only bad flakes

Offline jayman448

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Re: shooting heavy spined arrows
« Reply #5 on: August 29, 2017, 08:32:15 pm »
im basically shooting them because it is all i have left. my matched arrows are in poor condition and i just havent had the time to get them fixed. all of this information has mad a lot of sense. thanks guys

Offline Pappy

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Re: shooting heavy spined arrows
« Reply #6 on: August 30, 2017, 01:33:07 am »
My stiff arrows hit tail Right into the target, weak hit tail left. to heavy or to light who know where they might hit. Don't know about the point of impact thing, if my arrows are tuned and spline is correct the point of impact is where I am looking, I know some tube shooters or gap shooters use the point of impact thing, just not sure how all that works if the arrow in flying good. The only point of impact problem I have is if the arrow is heavy or light in physical weight then the impact is of course going to be low with a heavier arrow.  :o  ;)
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Offline bradsmith2010

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Re: shooting heavy spined arrows
« Reply #7 on: August 30, 2017, 09:13:04 am »
if you leave the arrow full length,, it should shoot out of the bow,,
if the only arrow that fly good are you flu flu, then maybe the bow is not set up right,,
I can shoot 70# spine out of my 50 # bow, if I leave them long,,
lots of variables here,,
the flu flu may be correcting for your form as well,,

and the other arrows are not,, just guessing,,

Online Beadman

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Re: shooting heavy spined arrows
« Reply #8 on: August 30, 2017, 12:27:09 pm »
Shooting full length tapered dogwoods or bamboo can be forgiving too.Like 5/16" at the nock and 23/64" at the tip.Good hunting arrows are precious.Getting a half dozen together can take a bit of time but it's what we do if we want to hunt with success consistently.
You got to stand for something or you'll fall for anything.
Ed

Offline High-Desert

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Re: shooting heavy spined arrows
« Reply #9 on: August 31, 2017, 05:50:48 am »
    I am no arrow expert, and I'm new to tuning arrows to bows. A buddy of mine fun of me because I had more bows than arrows. Anyway, jayman448, I hope you don't mind me throwing a question out on your post, but it's about stiff arrows.
    I know the general rule has been shoot 10 lbs under bow weight. When I did this with one of my recent bows, bares shaft, my arrows flew wild and hit the target so side ways, nock left, the arrows were snapping. I couldn't get decent flight until I got all the way up to 70 lbs spine and lowered my tip weight to 125 from 160, and cut shafts to 28". . It seems to me I'm doing something wrong....and no, my bow is not so fast it demands stiff arrow. It shoots 160 gps with 11 gpo arrows. Any ideas why it seems to want high spine, or what I'm doing wrong.
Eric

Offline PEARLY

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Re: shooting heavy spined arrows
« Reply #10 on: August 31, 2017, 09:11:53 am »
I have found the same to be true, Eric. I have no idea why a self bow would need 10# less spine? Maybe if it was a setty, nasty dog of a bow. I have a 48# Bear Grizzly that shoots the same 50# spine arrows my 48-50# self bows do. Very, very few of my bows wont shoot  the same 50-55# arrows cut to 29" with 125 up front, I draw 28".
Only when the last tree has died and the last river has been poisoned and the last fish has been caught will we realize we cannot eat money.

Offline bradsmith2010

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Re: shooting heavy spined arrows
« Reply #11 on: August 31, 2017, 10:50:56 am »
Pearl,, I find the same thing true,, (SH)

Offline High-Desert

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Re: shooting heavy spined arrows
« Reply #12 on: August 31, 2017, 11:32:02 am »
Ok, good,  thanks guys, glad I'm not the only one to experience the anamoly. I thought I must have been doing something wrong.
Eric

Online Beadman

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Re: shooting heavy spined arrows
« Reply #13 on: September 01, 2017, 05:57:37 am »
I have found the same to be true, Eric. I have no idea why a self bow would need 10# less spine? Maybe if it was a setty, nasty dog of a bow. I have a 48# Bear Grizzly that shoots the same 50# spine arrows my 48-50# self bows do. Very, very few of my bows wont shoot  the same 50-55# arrows cut to 29" with 125 up front, I draw 28".
Ok, good,  thanks guys, glad I'm not the only one to experience the anamoly. I thought I must have been doing something wrong.
It can be a frustrating learning curve.I found using FF string I need a 5# stiffer spine also opposed to B50.I think because it is stiffer.I just bare shaft tuned some dogwoods.They hit where I was looking at 15 yards when coming to proper anchor draw but tailed slightly left stuck in the target a big hay bale.I fletched them up anyway.They flew like a dart & quit tailing left upon impact then and hit straight.Go figure.
« Last Edit: September 01, 2017, 07:05:25 am by Beadman »
You got to stand for something or you'll fall for anything.
Ed