Author Topic: Fitting a take down  (Read 402 times)

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Offline DuBois

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Fitting a take down
« on: September 11, 2017, 06:52:25 am »
I have some sleeves but never tried one. Any trick to fitting wood to sleeves? What adhesive to use? Does the back get violated in the process.....Looked for build a long but no luck.
Whatever you know on it would be appreciated.
Thanks
« Last Edit: September 11, 2017, 07:56:19 am by DuBois »
Frisbeetarianism is the belief that when you die, your soul goes up on the roof and gets stuck.

George Carlin

Offline PEARL DRUMS/PEARLY/PD/DRUMS

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Re: Fitting a take down
« Reply #1 on: September 11, 2017, 08:13:07 am »
I have tried a few glues and none worked nearly as well as MT13 epoxy. Try not to mess with the back, but some billets give you no option when it comes time to get a good fit. Shape slowly and check the fit often as you go, you cant add wood back on :)

Only when the last tree has died and the last river has been poisoned and the last fish has been caught will we realize we cannot eat money.

Offline ---GUTSHOT--->

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Re: Fitting a take down
« Reply #2 on: September 11, 2017, 07:07:01 pm »
I made my first take down last year my fit was great at the fade ends, but not so great at the other ends. I used 5 min epoxy and filled the sleeve up to feel the voids. Still holding up.  Good luck

mikekeswick

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Re: Fitting a take down
« Reply #3 on: September 11, 2017, 10:09:56 pm »
Smooth- On MT13 and there is a great chapter in TTB.

Offline Pappy

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Re: Fitting a take down
« Reply #4 on: September 11, 2017, 11:52:02 pm »
One hint, be gentle with the sleeves, don't clap them in a vice and don't force them onto the billets. I just use a good epoxy, not the 5 minute kind, in case I have some trouble. :)
 Pappy
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Offline Eric Krewson

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Re: Fitting a take down
« Reply #5 on: September 12, 2017, 05:03:35 am »
I violated the grain on my last sleeve installation, being a non bending part of the handle I didn't think it would matter, it did.


Offline PEARL DRUMS/PEARLY/PD/DRUMS

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Re: Fitting a take down
« Reply #6 on: September 12, 2017, 06:12:46 am »
Eric I had the very same thing happen to one I attempted, but I admit I really dug in on that one. It wasn't just a bit of violation.
Only when the last tree has died and the last river has been poisoned and the last fish has been caught will we realize we cannot eat money.

Offline ksnow

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Re: Fitting a take down
« Reply #7 on: September 12, 2017, 06:18:13 am »
Eric, was that sleeve round, or was it flattened on the back?  I have a d shaped splice sleeve, and a set of yew billets form Pearl.  I want to make sure I understand the process VERY well before I attempt it. Thanks.

Kyle

Offline PEARL DRUMS/PEARLY/PD/DRUMS

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Re: Fitting a take down
« Reply #8 on: September 12, 2017, 06:35:35 am »
Kyle I can answer that based off his pic. That is the small sleeve set that is D shaped on its end view. One major bonus yew has over any other woods is you can get away with violating a back, quit a bit at times. Especially when its right at the grip. Do your best to keep the sapwood as even as possible and glue them in. 
Only when the last tree has died and the last river has been poisoned and the last fish has been caught will we realize we cannot eat money.

Offline DuBois

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Re: Fitting a take down
« Reply #9 on: September 13, 2017, 05:10:15 am »
Ok, now I have enough info to give it a go. Thank you all.
Frisbeetarianism is the belief that when you die, your soul goes up on the roof and gets stuck.

George Carlin