Author Topic: Detecting set  (Read 393 times)

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Online DC

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Detecting set
« on: September 12, 2017, 08:50:03 am »
There are a few threads discussing the nuances of tillering for no(or little) set. I can pretty much follow the logic of the tillering methods talked about here but they usually say something like "stop when you see set". A few have mentioned using a tracing of the unbraced bow. I have tried that and it does work pretty good but there must be others. You can't all have photographic memories. So, how do you see the set in time?
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Online Badger

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Re: Detecting set
« Reply #1 on: September 12, 2017, 09:10:43 am »
DC, I don't use a visual method, I measure the weight of the bow at bench marks I establish and if I see it dropping I know I am getting set. You can have a bow take almost no visual set but still have taken a lot of internal damage.

Offline PEARLY

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Re: Detecting set
« Reply #2 on: September 12, 2017, 09:33:47 am »
I don't pay that much attention until I'm done. I hold it up against my shop wall when I start and when I'm done. That's how I know. I probably sound like a sloppy builder, and maybe I am. I just build the bow that comes off my saw. It takes whatever set it takes. Its not like I'm going to stop on the dime and toss it in the junk can because I notice its taking some set. If I see too much too soon, I will usually stop and sit on top of the register to dry down more.
Only when the last tree has died and the last river has been poisoned and the last fish has been caught will we realize we cannot eat money.

Online DC

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Re: Detecting set
« Reply #3 on: September 12, 2017, 10:03:00 am »
DC, I don't use a visual method, I measure the weight of the bow at bench marks I establish and if I see it dropping I know I am getting set.

Then what is your next step? What do you do about it?

Quote
You can have a bow take almost no visual set but still have taken a lot of internal damage.

So, if there is no particular location that the set is happening, then that means you are trying to get too much weight out of that bow?
Vancouver Island

Online DC

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Re: Detecting set
« Reply #4 on: September 12, 2017, 10:06:18 am »
I don't pay that much attention until I'm done. I hold it up against my shop wall when I start and when I'm done. That's how I know. I probably sound like a sloppy builder, and maybe I am. I just build the bow that comes off my saw. It takes whatever set it takes. Its not like I'm going to stop on the dime and toss it in the junk can because I notice its taking some set. If I see too much too soon, I will usually stop and sit on top of the register to dry down more.
Well, it works. I got to shoot the Elm bow you gave Goat. The word "covet" springs to mind ;D ;D It sure felt like more than 32#.
You always seem to suspect wet wood for set. Do you live in a damp climate?
Vancouver Island

Offline PEARLY

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Re: Detecting set
« Reply #5 on: September 12, 2017, 10:21:18 am »
I live in a moderate climate where our average is around 45-50%, Michigan. I have come to suspect wet wood as the culprit because it is more often than not, providing all other aspects are covered.
Only when the last tree has died and the last river has been poisoned and the last fish has been caught will we realize we cannot eat money.

Offline PEARLY

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Re: Detecting set
« Reply #6 on: September 12, 2017, 10:22:58 am »
I'm glad you liked that elm bow, Don. I told goat I was never totally happy with it, but couldn't decide why so I shipped it off "as is" :)

And PS, that's Olivia's bow!
Only when the last tree has died and the last river has been poisoned and the last fish has been caught will we realize we cannot eat money.

Offline SLIMBOB

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Re: Detecting set
« Reply #7 on: September 12, 2017, 12:12:51 pm »
+1 PD. If I get the tiller right from the moment it starts bending, and never let it get over stressed, then set should be minimal assuming my design is proper for that bow.  Too short or narrow for that bow will result in set, exacerbated by uneven tiller. Good design is where it starts.
Liberty, In God We Trust, E Pluribus Unum.  Distinctly American Values.

Online DC

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Re: Detecting set
« Reply #8 on: September 12, 2017, 01:15:18 pm »
Maybe to clarify a bit. I can tell when a bow has taken set and I pretty much know what causes it. What I have trouble with is seeing where the set is coming from. Like what inch or so is too stressed and should be left alone.
Vancouver Island

Offline SLIMBOB

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Re: Detecting set
« Reply #9 on: September 12, 2017, 01:29:44 pm »
Straight edge tells me that.
Liberty, In God We Trust, E Pluribus Unum.  Distinctly American Values.

Online sleek

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Re: Detecting set
« Reply #10 on: September 12, 2017, 01:30:00 pm »
Perhaps a good way is to compare it to the outline you draw on the wall every inch of draw length you gain?
Tread softly and carry a bent stick.

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Offline George Tsoukalas

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Re: Detecting set
« Reply #11 on: September 12, 2017, 01:56:35 pm »
I take the stave and put the handle up against a wall and measure the tip deflection from the back of the tip to the wall.

Set cannot be avoided but it can be minimized starting long before the stave's first stringing and even before the first sharp instrument cuts into the stave.

Jawge
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Offline willie

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Re: Detecting set
« Reply #12 on: September 12, 2017, 02:02:17 pm »
use a gage block with a hole for your pencil. I think that eric has recently illustrated the embedded nut feature he incorporated into the gizmo.

A sharp pencil point lets you see small differences

Online DC

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Re: Detecting set
« Reply #13 on: September 12, 2017, 03:43:10 pm »
Most of my staves have some wiggle. Gizmo doesn't work on wiggles. Don't think a straight edge would either. Comparing it to the outline, I mentioned that in the first post, I don't think that's the only way. How many use an outline? I got the impression there are only a few.
Vancouver Island

Online sleek

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Re: Detecting set
« Reply #14 on: September 12, 2017, 03:50:33 pm »
Most of my staves have some wiggle. Gizmo doesn't work on wiggles. Don't think a straight edge would either. Comparing it to the outline, I mentioned that in the first post, I don't think that's the only way. How many use an outline? I got the impression there are only a few.

I use an outline when I am making short bows. You have less room for error. Lingerbkws, eh, dont care.
Tread softly and carry a bent stick.

Dont seek your happiness through the approval of others