Author Topic: Stinging nettles  (Read 595 times)

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Offline Mounter

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Stinging nettles
« on: November 02, 2017, 08:51:17 pm »
Any recipes? I saw on a cooking channel tonight that it's like a hipster delicacy... wish I could find away to market it....cha ching...

Online Pat B

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Re: Stinging nettles
« Reply #1 on: November 04, 2017, 04:29:54 am »
I've never tried it but it's probably better earlier in the year. The cooking eliminates the stinging properties I think. Maybe just boil or steam til tender.
Make the most of all that comes and the least of all that goes!    Pat Brennan  Brevard, NC

Offline Outbackbob48

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Re: Stinging nettles
« Reply #2 on: November 05, 2017, 08:34:54 am »
One of my favorites, I pick in the spring when nettles are just a foot high or less and just blanche or steam, all the stingy hairs must wilt or something, big tab of butter and good to go, later in year just pick the tops or new growth still tender ;D -C- Bob

Offline nclonghunter

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Re: Stinging nettles
« Reply #3 on: November 05, 2017, 03:15:22 pm »
Was at the Virginia Camp Dickinson knap-in and James Parker's wife cooked some nettles she picked there. They were really good and I would gladly eat them again.
There are no bad knappers, only bad flakes

Offline mullet

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Re: Stinging nettles
« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2018, 09:22:28 am »
Could someone post a picture of what you're eating? I can't imagine putting what we call stinging nettles in my mouth till I see if it's the same thing y'all are eating.
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Online Pat B

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Re: Stinging nettles
« Reply #5 on: February 04, 2018, 09:26:47 am »
Eddie, I think once it cooked the sting is gone.
Make the most of all that comes and the least of all that goes!    Pat Brennan  Brevard, NC

Offline tattoo dave

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Re: Stinging nettles
« Reply #6 on: February 06, 2018, 04:39:11 am »
I was also wondering. I've read the stingers are gone after cooking, but are we talking about eating the leaves, the stem, or both?

Tattoo Dave
Rockford, MI

Offline AndrewS

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Re: Stinging nettles
« Reply #7 on: February 06, 2018, 06:16:53 am »
You can cook a lot of stuff with nettles. If you have blanched,cooked oder stir the nettles they will don't make problems in your mouth. Don't try it raw as salad for example... 8)

- First like spinach.
- then make a pesto with hard cheese and hazelnuts (roasted) oder sunflowerseeds (roasted).
- mix blanched nettles with mashed potatoes and ad a little bit of Mountain cheese (like Emmentaler or better Gruyere) and mix again
- the roasted seeds have a slighly nutty aroma and they are a great topping for salads or something like a risotto
- the way outbackbob has described
-...

Offline JW_Halverson

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Re: Stinging nettles
« Reply #8 on: February 06, 2018, 03:13:43 pm »
Dice up a quarter cup of salt pork and start rendering slowly in a skillet.  Rinse the nettles really well in fresh water, and add about two quarts of them to the skillet.  Pour in a splash of water and cover with a lid so that the flash of steam helps wilt them down a little quicker.  Let that simmer on the stove a few minutes. Now abandon the lid and start stirring and turning the greens to mix well with the fat from the salt pork.  Before serving, add a tiny bit of lemon juice or apple cider vinegar to brighten them up. 
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