Author Topic: Back to Building  (Read 744 times)

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Offline Eric Krewson

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Back to Building
« on: January 20, 2019, 03:45:47 am »
Well, the inner masochist came out in me for the last few days, I decide to resume work on a Haines flintlock rifle project. It was a kit gun I bought second hand and found it had so many flaws in the stock I didn't think I could complete it. One by one I am fixing the flaws, I think I can conceal my fixes with stain and finish where they will be invisible in the finished gun. Today it was inlet the barrel tang and fill the gaps with glued in shims. I created the small gap in the back, the stock profiler created the huge one at the front when the kit was made. My fixes will be stronger than the initial stock wood.




Offline Parnell

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Re: Back to Building
« Reply #1 on: January 21, 2019, 12:21:19 pm »
Hmm, so just a touch of wood glue and then sand clean?
1>1

Offline Eric Krewson

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Re: Back to Building
« Reply #2 on: January 22, 2019, 03:37:19 am »
I used unibond but was surprised it didn't stick worth a hoot. I cut new wedges and glued them in with superglue gel which kept them rock solid. Next I used a file and dremel with a sanding drum to feather the lower part of the wedge into the side of the inlet, the gaps were only at the top.  I cut off the excess wood and drawfiled the tang and the patch to get a perfect fit.

Here is a similar fix after finishing a rifle, there were wedges inserted on both sides of the tang.


« Last Edit: January 22, 2019, 03:40:40 am by Eric Krewson »

Offline Eric Krewson

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Re: Back to Building
« Reply #3 on: June 18, 2019, 02:55:44 pm »
After going in the gizmo business for St Jude and finishing dropping a bows poundage so my aging body can accommodate shooting it comfortably I am out of projects.

I decided to resume work on my Haines rifle, the lock inlet repair in a past thread took the wind out of my sails and killed my enthusiasm.

Todays work was simple but after a layoff I found I need to relearn patience. I inletted the trigger plate slightly. When I get the plate in I will add the internals and head the trigger bars toward the sear on the lock. This is the most stunning piece of wood I have ever had in my shop, it is also splintery beyond belief and very difficult to cut cleanly.

First things first;