Author Topic: Toothy scrapers  (Read 779 times)

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Offline Jhuem

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Toothy scrapers
« on: October 20, 2018, 01:49:02 pm »
I am looking at starting my first project and I have seen concave and convex scrapers with teeth that line up perfectly. I have looked for a place which sell these but cannot find any. Does anyone know where to get one?

Offline Pat B

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Re: Toothy scrapers
« Reply #1 on: October 29, 2018, 05:08:33 am »
Make one using a triangular file.
Make the most of all that comes and the least of all that goes!    Pat Brennan  Brevard, NC

Offline JNystrom

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Re: Toothy scrapers
« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2018, 10:30:54 am »
I made two bows with the triangular file and a cabinet scraper method, but i truly didn't like it. I found out people use and praise a toothing plane blade. I then bought one for myself too. Its obviously better steel than a cabinet scraper and easier to resharpen. But what is the best, it is precise. By filing with hand i found out my cabinet scraper grooves were actually pretty bad even though i tried to make them as good as i could.

Offline BowEd

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Re: Toothy scrapers
« Reply #3 on: October 29, 2018, 10:46:34 am »
I used a saws-all blade and made them triangular teeth.Slightly less than 1 MM or 1/32" deep grooves @ 12 grooves to the inch.Although these are not convex or concave but only flat.
BowEd
You got to stand for something or you'll fall for anything.
Ed

Offline leehongyi

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Re: Toothy scrapers
« Reply #4 on: November 28, 2018, 05:01:10 pm »
A CNC grooving knife would be helpful.

Offline NorthHeart (240m3srt)

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Re: Toothy scrapers
« Reply #5 on: December 02, 2018, 02:55:54 pm »
When you use this method for a composite bow, and attempt to mate the horn belly to the wood core, is the idea that the 2 sides will literally fit together perfectly like a puzzle piece, male grove into female groove all the way down the limb?  If so, it would seem that any slight left to right deviation as your making these valleys would hinder a proper fit when you attempt to mate up the other side.

I have no idea, just thinking out loud.  A composite bow is something id like to attempt later on down the road.

Offline leehongyi

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Re: Toothy scrapers
« Reply #6 on: December 03, 2018, 08:07:23 am »
When you use this method for a composite bow, and attempt to mate the horn belly to the wood core, is the idea that the 2 sides will literally fit together perfectly like a puzzle piece, male grove into female groove all the way down the limb?  If so, it would seem that any slight left to right deviation as your making these valleys would hinder a proper fit when you attempt to mate up the other side.

I have no idea, just thinking out loud.  A composite bow is something id like to attempt later on down the road.

if you choose this way you must control all the grooves parallel or the non match area will become empty and delaminated. Another method is glue the flat surfaces together and also perform well.

Offline BowEd

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Re: Toothy scrapers
« Reply #7 on: December 04, 2018, 04:33:20 am »
Using interlocking grooves actually assures durability and non breakage if done properly while tillering from the extreme reverse dried and cured profile.It will stop any cracks from migrating.Usually done on bows of higher poundage above 80 to 100 pounds or more but still good assurance on your first few 60 to 80 pound bows.Otherwise flat mating works well too on lower poundage bows.
BowEd
You got to stand for something or you'll fall for anything.
Ed

Offline loefflerchuck

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Re: Toothy scrapers
« Reply #8 on: December 07, 2018, 05:05:08 pm »
All the old grooved bows were non matching grooves. I have a Indo/Persian bow probably 200+ years old. It has the horn belly missing on one limb and you can see the construction. The grooves are far from matching. The idea here is many layers of thin glue sizing to have a thick glue line.

Offline BowEd

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Re: Toothy scrapers
« Reply #9 on: December 08, 2018, 04:22:53 am »
Correct.The interlocking grooved construction is a more modern type of construction used lately,but has been proven to work very well.
« Last Edit: December 08, 2018, 06:30:20 am by BowEd »
BowEd
You got to stand for something or you'll fall for anything.
Ed

Offline NorthHeart (240m3srt)

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Re: Toothy scrapers
« Reply #10 on: December 08, 2018, 08:24:09 am »
All the old grooved bows were non matching grooves. I have a Indo/Persian bow probably 200+ years old. It has the horn belly missing on one limb and you can see the construction. The grooves are far from matching. The idea here is many layers of thin glue sizing to have a thick glue line.

Very interesting, thanks for the clarification Chuck.

Offline loefflerchuck

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Re: Toothy scrapers
« Reply #11 on: December 08, 2018, 02:18:10 pm »
One of these days I'll get around to posting photos of the bow. The horn belly looks to have only taken up the center half of the belly with thick sinew taking up the space on the sides and covering the horn belly

Offline stuckinthemud

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Re: Toothy scrapers
« Reply #12 on: December 13, 2018, 11:21:41 am »
One of these days I'll get around to posting photos of the bow. The horn belly looks to have only taken up the center half of the belly with thick sinew taking up the space on the sides and covering the horn belly

Those are photos I'd really love to see!