Author Topic: Buck in the mist  (Read 795 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline BowEd

  • Member
  • Posts: 7278
  • BowEd
Re: Buck in the mist
« Reply #30 on: December 06, 2018, 11:55:15 am »
Sounds like ranchers or cattleman owning large tracts of land out your way.To hunt on their lands you need an inside acquaintance to get a foot through the door.
One thing I found out about deer hunting here is that lines are crossed occasionally being divided into many different owners.I'm sure it drives the local game warden crazy with all of the complaints.I'm glad I'm on good terms with my neighbors.
BowEd
You got to stand for something or you'll fall for anything.
Ed

Offline Hawkdancer

  • Member
  • Posts: 2078
Re: Buck in the mist
« Reply #31 on: December 06, 2018, 07:12:14 pm »
The guy with the huge acreage wants $$1,500-$2,000 to let you hunt, but doesn't hesitate to cry wildlife damage if the deer or elk get after his hay!  The people own the wildlife here in Colorado, and my thinking is if you want damage money - we want free hunting to stop our game from eating your hay that you aren't paying for anyway.  Our trespass laws are very strict, like down to a yard or less!  If I am anywhere near private land, I try. To have a good map, compass, and some sort of gps locator with me, found out my phone has a locator, so that helps.  Also, there is an app that shows public, private boundaries and ownership.  I will check with Jacie and post the info.
Hawkdancer
Life is far too serious to be taken that way!
Jerry

Offline BowEd

  • Member
  • Posts: 7278
  • BowEd
Re: Buck in the mist
« Reply #32 on: December 07, 2018, 03:08:43 am »
This subject is going a different direction.The state of Iowa here owns the wildlife.Outfitters lease ground from land owners by the acre and then charge unbelievable prices for hunters to hunt too.Even more than $1500.00-$2000.00.This subject is all about the money.When money enters the equation the fun goes out of it far as I'm concerned.It boils down then to whoever offers the best offer to the land owner as to who hunts.It's exactly why I've carved out my own little slice of heaven here I can enjoy with minimal fees[to the state] and hassle.
I found out exactly what went by on my neighbors ground.His land was not trespassed upon.He was mistaken.Hunters with permission from the land owner hunted land next to my neighbors.They were from out of state and were only hunting on land they had permission on.
« Last Edit: December 07, 2018, 03:24:38 am by BowEd »
BowEd
You got to stand for something or you'll fall for anything.
Ed

Offline JW_Halverson

  • Member
  • Posts: 10855
    • Black Hills Raptor Center
Re: Buck in the mist
« Reply #33 on: December 07, 2018, 06:29:15 am »
I gotta heartily agree with you. When Pay-to Play enters the equation, not only the fun goes out, but the course is set and the final destination becomes the old European model of hunting.  Wildlife is no longer managed for the public, but for those that can afford it, and now we have the beginnings of a stratified class system where your options are dictated by your class. While there may be a rare few here in this forum that would continue to hunt, the vast majority of us will become the peasants looking longingly at the lord of the manor's deer.

But I am glad to hear that the neighbor's land was unviolated. I am glad to hear the out of state hunters had the good ethics to remain on appropriate property.

I hope you find your elusive bucks in the mist for a long time to come, Ed. I know how it means far more to you than just the meat in the freezer, another set of antlers hanging, or a hide to be brained.
Guns have triggers. Bicycles have wheels. Trees and bows have wooden limbs.

Offline BowEd

  • Member
  • Posts: 7278
  • BowEd
Re: Buck in the mist
« Reply #34 on: December 07, 2018, 07:36:45 am »
Thanks for the acknowledgement of my shown and stated values on wildlife.To set the record straight here.One thing to point out about this is that I've paid my fee to own land in the U.S. as anyone can through hard work.This makes it a bit different than the old European model of hunting.The state here still owns or oversees the harvesting of deer but not the land.It's a free country where people can work for themselves if they like and not for any lords or nobles.The shots I get at these deer are not just happen stance occurances as the pictures may project.Most times many many hours are spent in just getting a shot.My statements may seem harsh and do understand your frustrations but it's just the way it is.
Added to this the state provides quite a bit of public hunting land for hunters paid for by hunters and fisherman so that anyone can hunt with proper "state controlled fees".
Are'nt there any deer on the land that you turkey hunt on?
« Last Edit: December 07, 2018, 08:20:33 am by BowEd »
BowEd
You got to stand for something or you'll fall for anything.
Ed

Offline JW_Halverson

  • Member
  • Posts: 10855
    • Black Hills Raptor Center
Re: Buck in the mist
« Reply #35 on: December 07, 2018, 09:09:26 am »
Yes, there are deer on the public land where I hunt turkey. However, the tags are becoming more and more scarce for that public land while many tags go unfilled on much of the privately owned prairie land that compromises 96% of the state. The additional few percentage points of private land leased for access by the state is heavily pressured both by locals and out of state hunters. 

Since 1955 the United States has lost half of the hunting public. It is hovering just above 5% of the population. And those that hunt and fish carry almost the entire burden of conservation dollars.  The well is going dry.
Guns have triggers. Bicycles have wheels. Trees and bows have wooden limbs.

Offline BowEd

  • Member
  • Posts: 7278
  • BowEd
Re: Buck in the mist
« Reply #36 on: December 07, 2018, 02:05:12 pm »
This state monitors the numbers of harvested deer every year and tags are issued here according to what each county can handle on numbers.The harvest numbers have increased in this state from 2016 to 2017 by 4%.Granted these numbers can fluctuate a little according to the amount of antlerless tags issued and harvested but a limitless number is available for residents.Many do go unfullfilled here too but that's not out of the normal occurance since I can ever remember.I'm in my mid sixties and been hunting since a little boy.Over the last decade deer numbers are as good as they have ever been and even better.Steadily increasing from year to year.Making the well as wet or wetter than ever here for revenue from residents and for deer populations.No dooms day dilemma here.Hunters in this state can eat as much deer as they ever wanted to and a lot of meat goes to food pantries for homeless people or those needing assistance.
This is info from the horses mouth of 2 different DNR officers of this state.I cannot state anything about your state.The percentage of hunting public tags issued versus land owners tags is roughly 80% versus 20% in this state with 97% of the land hunted privately owned and 3% public hunting.Some of the lowest percentages in the country mostly because of it fertile nature of the soil used for crops.States out west have a lot larger tracts for public hunting percentage wise. I'm sure most of the hunting done on private land other than the land owner is from public hunters knowing the land owner through an acquaintance or friendship with no money involved in this state.You must not know too many country folk in your local area is all I can only imagine but you put invitations out to others for turkey hunting.I would say for your situation in your state the early bird gets the worm probably and really don't know how you can state for the state of affairs for the whole country as the info here in Iowa is we are doing fine.
It's always been the burden of hunters fees to carry the load for conservation since I can ever remember.Nothing has changed for decades about that.That's old news.
To add here in reflection no system is perfect and has it's flaws.This one though at least gives enough freedom to adapt to it.A resource as this has to be managed properly by an overall power.To be left to be managed by the public would have very toxic results.
« Last Edit: December 09, 2018, 07:04:22 am by BowEd »
BowEd
You got to stand for something or you'll fall for anything.
Ed

Offline bjrogg

  • Member
  • Posts: 5896
  • Cedar Pond
Re: Buck in the mist
« Reply #37 on: December 09, 2018, 05:55:38 am »
Ed congratulations again on a very successful hunting season. I know how hard it is to get these shots and how much work and planning goes into it. I own land to and much like you it is very small amount that is actually suitable for this type of hunting. It's very easy to change patterns and completely screw up my hunting even by something I do.

I really do feel blessed to have the opportunity I have and live in this great nation. To be a land owner is both a blessing and a curse. We don't have the huge tracts of land like the prairie, but we still have the same delima with land owners being afraid to let someone they don't know or maybe even do know hunt their property. The same problem of hunters being mad at land owners that won't let them hunt on their property. Of outfitters who lease properties and then charge hunters to use the land they lease. It's pretty hard, probably impossible to make everyone happy. I don't mean to disrespect any one but land owners are in a tough spot to. Many would rather put up with hundreds of deer or Elk damaging their crops then dozens of hunters driving their vehicles through them. Leaving their litter, carcasses knocking down fences leaving gates open. It may seem like paying a outfitter $1,500 or $2,000 is very expensive, but I assure you it's much cheaper than owning land and usually you get more than just the right to hunt a property. I've never done this type of hunt but I do know some local outfitters. They provide blinds, transportation to and from them. Recover animals, and process them and refrigerate them. For goose they provide decoys and set them up. No small job. They provide blinds and callers. For turkey the same. I know $1,500 or $2,000 seems like a lot and to be honest I couldn't afford it either, but it is probably a good deal compared to the expense of owning land. My property taxes are many times more than that. The outfitters I know aren't getting rich. They are providing non land owners with a much less expensive opportunity to hunt private land. Like Ed I also have many people who ask to hunt my land. I do allow a few select hunters that opportunity. Most I know, but some I don't. I might know someone else they know or a different landowner they hunt. It does help to bring a small gift. Maybe a can of peanuts any little thing. It just makes a good impression and when someone is asking to hunt your property your wondering what their really made of.

Ed I'm really sorry this post went in a different direction. It is a topic that should be in a different thread. I'm not meaning to high jack it. I'm just trying to explain a few things many don't realize or think of. And we're not even talking about the possibility of law suits.

Jerry and JW I hope you find a Happy Hunting ground without leaving this world or nation. I'm pretty sure if you can even find one landowner that allows you to hunt and you keep them happy they'll tell others.

Bjrogg
A hot cup of coffee and a beautiful sunrise

Offline BowEd

  • Member
  • Posts: 7278
  • BowEd
Re: Buck in the mist
« Reply #38 on: December 09, 2018, 07:01:05 am »
That's quite alright BJ.I thought I had pointed out myself too the flip side view of land ownership and it's responsibilities but your points are well stated.Experience/education/and understanding with an open mind minus the personal feelings is an invaluable sometimes scarce commodity.
There's an ongoing effort made here in the state of Iowa through news letters by the DNR because of it's lack of public hunting ground to buy private hunting ground from land owners just for public hunting or to at least volunteer the access.It makes sense of course to the DNR.Many of whom have volunteered from what I've heard.
Anyway it's that time of year now herds start forming and what my friends call and what I've seen myself too that traveler bucks start coming through to catch unbred does & does coming into estrus.It's fun to watch for sure.To get a shot is another thing,but there's a good chance of it with the weather being the way it is forecast to be.
« Last Edit: December 12, 2018, 04:47:17 am by BowEd »
BowEd
You got to stand for something or you'll fall for anything.
Ed