Author Topic: Back to Building  (Read 1422 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Eric Krewson

  • Member
  • Posts: 3511
Back to Building
« on: January 20, 2019, 03:45:47 am »
Well, the inner masochist came out in me for the last few days, I decide to resume work on a Haines flintlock rifle project. It was a kit gun I bought second hand and found it had so many flaws in the stock I didn't think I could complete it. One by one I am fixing the flaws, I think I can conceal my fixes with stain and finish where they will be invisible in the finished gun. Today it was inlet the barrel tang and fill the gaps with glued in shims. I created the small gap in the back, the stock profiler created the huge one at the front when the kit was made. My fixes will be stronger than the initial stock wood.




Offline Parnell

  • Member
  • Posts: 4895
Re: Back to Building
« Reply #1 on: January 21, 2019, 12:21:19 pm »
Hmm, so just a touch of wood glue and then sand clean?
1>1

Offline Eric Krewson

  • Member
  • Posts: 3511
Re: Back to Building
« Reply #2 on: January 22, 2019, 03:37:19 am »
I used unibond but was surprised it didn't stick worth a hoot. I cut new wedges and glued them in with superglue gel which kept them rock solid. Next I used a file and dremel with a sanding drum to feather the lower part of the wedge into the side of the inlet, the gaps were only at the top.  I cut off the excess wood and drawfiled the tang and the patch to get a perfect fit.

Here is a similar fix after finishing a rifle, there were wedges inserted on both sides of the tang.


« Last Edit: January 22, 2019, 03:40:40 am by Eric Krewson »

Offline Eric Krewson

  • Member
  • Posts: 3511
Re: Back to Building
« Reply #3 on: June 18, 2019, 02:55:44 pm »
After going in the gizmo business for St Jude and finishing dropping a bows poundage so my aging body can accommodate shooting it comfortably I am out of projects.

I decided to resume work on my Haines rifle, the lock inlet repair in a past thread took the wind out of my sails and killed my enthusiasm.

Todays work was simple but after a layoff I found I need to relearn patience. I inletted the trigger plate slightly. When I get the plate in I will add the internals and head the trigger bars toward the sear on the lock. This is the most stunning piece of wood I have ever had in my shop, it is also splintery beyond belief and very difficult to cut cleanly.

First things first;


Offline Eric Krewson

  • Member
  • Posts: 3511
Re: Back to Building
« Reply #4 on: July 03, 2019, 01:29:56 pm »
The trigger plate is in, it took a while because the extra curly wood is so splintery.

I made a little gadget with a refrigerator magnet to hold my parts over the lamp to black them, it sure saves the fingers.

Offline johnfolchetti

  • Member
  • Posts: 177
Re: Back to Building
« Reply #5 on: July 04, 2019, 05:37:10 am »
That gadget looks great for holding parts like that.....not only saves the fingers but looks like it guarantees full lamp black across the part. Seems like I smudge part of it off every time I try to insert the part back into the inlet after blacking it. Great idea. Thanks for sharing that.

Offline Eric Krewson

  • Member
  • Posts: 3511
Re: Back to Building
« Reply #6 on: July 04, 2019, 07:15:16 am »
I started with a magnetic auto part retrieval tool, it worked but grabbed the part much tighter and was a bit cumbersome.



Offline Eric Krewson

  • Member
  • Posts: 3511
Re: Back to Building
« Reply #7 on: July 18, 2019, 03:15:27 am »
When the mushrooms and the garden comes in I seem to drop everything for food preservation.


Offline chamookman

  • Member
  • Posts: 2383
Re: Back to Building
« Reply #8 on: July 18, 2019, 10:54:57 pm »
Yum - Nice diversion  -C- ! Bob
"May the Gods give Us the strength to draw the string to the cheek, the arrow to the barb and loose the flying shaft, so long as life may last." Saxon Pope - 1923.

Offline Eric Krewson

  • Member
  • Posts: 3511
Re: Back to Building
« Reply #9 on: August 18, 2019, 05:31:01 am »
I got my trigger in, it didn't work. I measured twice and cut once but found it is 1/8" to far back. I inletted a little more and moved it up, it fires the lock set but not unset. I think it needs to go a little deeper. I found prussian blue is a much better inletting marker than lamp soot or inletting black.

The first one I put in a TN rifle worked perfectly the first time I tried it. I am going to look at its sear/trigger bar orientation today and see what is different between the two.

I have a # 7 optivisor lens with a 4" focal length, I like it for detail work but it strains my neck if I use it too much.

I decided to order a new lens with longer focal length but found each lens is $32, almost what I paid for the whole rig. I noticed the chinese knock offs on ebay for $19 shipped, they come with 4 lenses of different power, I took a chance and ordered one, mainly for the lenses. When it came in I was surprised by the quality, it is almost as good as an optivisor and the lens are just the same and will fit an optivisor.

« Last Edit: August 19, 2019, 04:38:51 am by Eric Krewson »

Offline Hawkdancer

  • Member
  • Posts: 2870
Re: Back to Building
« Reply #10 on: August 18, 2019, 09:10:21 am »
Handsome >:D at work under visor (lol)!  Nice build along! 
Hawkdancer
Life is far too serious to be taken that way!
Jerry

Online Deerhunter21

  • Member
  • Posts: 452
Re: Back to Building
« Reply #11 on: August 18, 2019, 01:48:24 pm »
I might build a muzzleloader once i get a job, but i dont know if i hace the right tools so ill just watch you for now`
"Only when the last tree has died and the last river been poisoned and the last fish been caught will we realise we cannot eat money." Cree Native-American Proverb

A amature practices untill he gets it right. A master practices untill he never gets it wrong.