Author Topic: Building arrows  (Read 2041 times)

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Offline loon

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Re: Building arrows
« Reply #15 on: March 05, 2019, 10:46:59 am »
Straightening raw shafts is very much a test of patience for me. But it's not hard to fletch arrows and glue on points and a nock.

The hundreds of tonkin shafts I got a few years ago aren't very good quality. They seem to have mold damage (I don't think more than they initially had), and one is pliable when cold even though I used heat to straighten it. Yet they seem really dry. Especially the ones that just shatter into dust when bent.
« Last Edit: March 05, 2019, 03:27:31 pm by loon »

Offline Pappy

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Re: Building arrows
« Reply #16 on: March 06, 2019, 02:56:11 am »
I would be afraid  of that loon, I never take a chance on a risky shaft, seen some break when shot and it ant pretty, I give them a pretty good bend test along the shaft either shoots/blanks or Cain before I start to be sure they are solid and no bad spots, any question I break them, not worth the risk.  :) a broke shaft through the arm or hand would make for a very bad day for you not to mention for someone standing close by. :)
 Pappy
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Life is Good

Offline JEB

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Re: Building arrows
« Reply #17 on: March 08, 2019, 02:33:05 am »
Agree with Pappy on this one. I have some 60's cedar shafts that I use all the time but cedar is a different wood.

Offline Deerhunter21

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Re: Building arrows
« Reply #18 on: March 12, 2019, 10:43:35 am »
What does TSA stand for?
"Only when the last tree has died and the last river been poisoned and the last fish been caught will we realise we cannot eat money." Cree Native-American Proverb

Offline TSA

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Re: Building arrows
« Reply #19 on: March 13, 2019, 01:58:30 pm »

Offline PEARL DRUMS/PEARLY/PD/DRUMS

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Re: Building arrows
« Reply #20 on: March 14, 2019, 09:50:11 am »
I'm just about out of those extra fine shafts, Wayne. Ill be getting with you in the next few months. I'll need a fresh dozen for this falls arrows.
Only when the last tree has died and the last river has been poisoned and the last fish has been caught will we realize we cannot eat money.

Offline TSA

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Re: Building arrows
« Reply #21 on: March 15, 2019, 05:45:49 am »
really glad they are working out for you :)
what are you chasing, come fall?

Offline Pat B

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Re: Building arrows
« Reply #22 on: March 15, 2019, 05:50:20 am »
I got 2 dozen Sitka shafts from Wayne(TSA) and they are as good as it gets. I made one set of arrows(need to send one to you, Wayne). Need to make another set but now just isn't the time.  ;)
Make the most of all that comes and the least of all that goes!    Pat Brennan  Brevard, NC

Offline PEARL DRUMS/PEARLY/PD/DRUMS

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Re: Building arrows
« Reply #23 on: March 15, 2019, 08:48:54 am »
really glad they are working out for you :)
what are you chasing, come fall?

They aren't just working, they are the best parallel shafts I've used. I'll be chasing whitetail around the woodlots.
Only when the last tree has died and the last river has been poisoned and the last fish has been caught will we realize we cannot eat money.

Offline Woodely

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Re: Building arrows
« Reply #24 on: March 23, 2019, 06:48:53 am »
The secret is to spine test every shaft you turn/make, or, buy them from TSA and get a dozen of the exact same shaft, they will all fly perfectly. If you don't have a spine tester then bare shaft tuning each and every shaft is the only other method to make them all fly the same.  6 out of 10 means you're wasting 40% of your energy and time.
On another note I feel like I'm wasting energy and time when I'm building bows and they end up breaking, although not much anymore.   Other than that I have nothing to do and all day to do it in.  :)
"Doing bad work is an exercise in futility, but honestly making mistakes is trying your best."

Offline Pat B

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Re: Building arrows
« Reply #25 on: March 23, 2019, 07:07:58 am »
If you are learning from broken bows then you're not wasting time.
Make the most of all that comes and the least of all that goes!    Pat Brennan  Brevard, NC

Offline Woodely

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Re: Building arrows
« Reply #26 on: March 23, 2019, 09:14:31 am »
If you are learning from broken bows then you're not wasting time.
True enough,  and oh yes I have learned a lot.   ;D  Anyway onto the next project.
"Doing bad work is an exercise in futility, but honestly making mistakes is trying your best."

Offline allanmeier

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Re: Building arrows
« Reply #27 on: April 19, 2019, 04:18:12 am »
sorry for my incredible ignorance, but what is TSA? I put together some arrows (buying shafts, fletching, kocks etc. from 3 rivers), and they cost around $8/arrow. That seems a little pricy and I want to start producing my own.
also want to try forging broadheads. Any ideas?

Offline Hawkdancer

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Re: Building arrows
« Reply #28 on: April 19, 2019, 08:00:21 am »
Allen,  TSA is TrueShaft archery, one of the sponsors.  Check out their website.  Very nice folks.  Located in Canada.  As for forging your own broadheads, got to be some body close who can help you get set up, or let you use their forge to start out and learn.  Might try cutting some out of old saw blades, too.  Have fun!
Hawkdancer
Life is far too serious to be taken that way!
Jerry

Offline Deerhunter21

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Re: Building arrows
« Reply #29 on: April 24, 2019, 03:56:08 am »
Allen, look up videos of forging arrowheads from rebar. how to get the metal hot, well you can use a bucket filled with charcoal and a hairdryer for the air. you will need some insulator like plaster of paris and sand in the (metal) bucket or kaowool. just line the bucket with the kaowool or fill it up with plaster of paris and sand. put a (smaller) bucket in the middle of it and let the plaster dry around the bucket. you will have a hollow hole in it to put the charcoal in.
"Only when the last tree has died and the last river been poisoned and the last fish been caught will we realise we cannot eat money." Cree Native-American Proverb