Author Topic: Splice reinforcement  (Read 1017 times)

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Online DC

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Splice reinforcement
« on: May 17, 2019, 04:08:16 pm »
I think I asked this before and never got a definitive answer. Now I'm thinking about making a legal flight bow so it's more important. If I use billets and also use two pieces of backing is it legal to have a short "power lam" to reinforce the splice? My splices are 2 1/2" long so the "power lam" would only have to be about 4". it may not be necessary but it would make me feel better :D
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Offline PatM

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Re: Splice reinforcement
« Reply #1 on: May 17, 2019, 05:23:01 pm »
Chances are they will bounce the bow into the complex composite class even though it's not complex in the working limb.

 You can check the rules.  Presumably you are going by the American rules.

   You may be OK if the power lam definitively does not extend at all into the fades and work at all.

 Check the simple composite rules here.
https://usflightarchery.com/pdf/02_USAA-2017-Update-Flight%20Equipment.pdf
« Last Edit: May 17, 2019, 05:27:26 pm by PatM »

Online DC

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Re: Splice reinforcement
« Reply #2 on: May 17, 2019, 05:40:48 pm »
I noticed this
iv) The bow handle may be wrapped with leather or other natural materials.

If the handle wrap covered the "power lam" they wouldn't know it was there. So they must think that anything under the wrap is OK. What do you think?

 Didn't know that "under the wraps" was an archery term ;D ;D ;D
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Offline Badger

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Re: Splice reinforcement
« Reply #3 on: May 17, 2019, 07:09:20 pm »
   A built up handle is fine for a simple composite bow. I believe your power lam would have to be less than 12" long but to be sure I would have to double check the rules on that.

Offline PatM

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Re: Splice reinforcement
« Reply #4 on: May 18, 2019, 04:53:44 am »
Yes, a block can be added but the length is limited to the non working area.  May not be a set  length thing but rather dependent on where the limbs begin to work.

Online DC

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Re: Splice reinforcement
« Reply #5 on: May 18, 2019, 07:44:16 am »
I think I'll be fine. It would be well within the handle.
Vancouver Island
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Offline PatM

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Re: Splice reinforcement
« Reply #6 on: May 18, 2019, 10:59:06 am »
It's worth noting that between the two classes at 50 pounds there is only a yard of difference between the two records by Steve and Alan.

 So you could probably pick  either division.
 
The concern is obviously that you may be bumped a class on a technicality and feel like you are at a disadvantage.   That's probably not the case.   At least currently.

Online DC

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Re: Splice reinforcement
« Reply #7 on: May 18, 2019, 11:35:35 am »
That's 100yds more than I've shot. Yikes!
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Offline PatM

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Re: Splice reinforcement
« Reply #8 on: May 18, 2019, 01:46:49 pm »
 How light were your arrows?   Actually I think the complex composite allows a small overdraw too.

Online DC

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Re: Splice reinforcement
« Reply #9 on: May 18, 2019, 01:55:36 pm »
Right around 300 grains. That's got to be closer to 200 I think.
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Offline PatM

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Re: Splice reinforcement
« Reply #10 on: May 18, 2019, 05:06:23 pm »
If you could get a  lighter 23" arrow and use a slight overdraw you'd be well up there in distance.

 The complex primitive composite really does allow all the extras permitted back in the day as just regular flight allowances.

 We really should be back over 500 yards in this class regularly.

 Don Brown's unlimited record is well out there but there should be more shots filling that 350-600 yard  gap, especially in more mortal draw weights.

From the USA rules;

  "ix) RELEASE - Glove, tab, hook, rope, thumb ring, finger ring, non-adjustable hook and loop, and flipper are allowed for Primitive Complex Composite Bows.   These items shall not be made from synthetic materials.  Metal is allowed for a release aid. x) ARROW REST – An overdraw is allowed, not to exceed 4 inches (10.2 cm) in length, measured from the back of the bow to the terminal point of the rest.  An elevated or collapsible arrow rest is allowed.
« Last Edit: May 18, 2019, 05:13:55 pm by PatM »

Online DC

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Re: Splice reinforcement
« Reply #11 on: May 19, 2019, 08:18:09 am »
If you use an overdraw is the draw weight measured to the back of the bow or the back of the overdraw?
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Offline avcase

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Re: Splice reinforcement
« Reply #12 on: May 19, 2019, 08:36:34 pm »
The overdraw is the total depth of the handle plus additional overdraw at the arrow pass.

The 50# Primitive complex-composite Record is certainly the most vulnerable of the two. I put a little feather rest on the side of the handle of that bow, so it didn’t take advantage of being center shot, and it didn’t use an overdraw. Arrow was 23” long. 

I’d love to see someone exceed 400 yards with any of the 50# Primitive bow types.  We’ve been talking about it for a long time but it just hasn’t happened yet.  It would just require a concerted effort. I am always more than happy to help too with strings or “Primitive” non-mechanical releases or whatever.

Steve’s record for the 50# simple composite was quite a shot. He shot an arrow a few yards farther out of that same bow on the prior round, but he used a modern material string which put it up against the modern glass and carbon longbows. The funny thing is that this would have been good enough for a 50# modern Longbow record if he would have done this just eight years earlier.

Alan
« Last Edit: May 21, 2019, 09:35:54 am by avcase »

Offline avcase

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Re: Splice reinforcement
« Reply #13 on: May 21, 2019, 09:44:23 am »
If you use an overdraw is the draw weight measured to the back of the bow or the back of the overdraw?

The draw weight is measured where the arrow point begins to fall free from the arrow rest. Whether this is a bump on a shelf or feather rest. I will also clarify that it is okay to extend the overdraw further than the total 4” depth as long as it doesn’t make it possible to get off a clean shot with the arrow point drawn further than the 4” depth. The reason I mention this is to encourage the use of an additional extension of the overdraw to catch the arrow tip and help prevent an arrow shot in the hand in case it is drawn too far and off the intended arrow rest.

Alan

Alan