Author Topic: Arrow Nock help needed  (Read 923 times)

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Offline TimberTinker

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Arrow Nock help needed
« on: September 21, 2019, 11:36:58 pm »
Hey All,

Not sure if this is the right forum for this but I need help figuring out the right size arrow nock.
First off I'm relatively new to all this.

I made my first board bow, fitted with 14 strand b50 string.  The strands are 7x7 Flemish twist.  I bought some arrows and the nocks fit absolutely perfectly on my bow string without a serving.  I served it with .018 string and now the nocks are way too tight.

I like the string setup, want to keep it served for sure, any size serving will render the nocks on these arrows too tight since they are perfect with no serving.  I really don't want to go less strands on the string and so replacing the nocks seems the way to go... however I cannot find ANYTHING to help finding the right size nock for different size strings.

Anyone have this secret info?


Thanks a bunch in advance!!

Offline Knoll

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Re: Arrow Nock help needed
« Reply #1 on: September 22, 2019, 07:13:53 am »
What is pull weight of your bow? I use 5 lb/strand to determine # of strands for a string. Could fewer strands be used?
... alone in distant woods or fields, in unpretending sproutlands or pastures tracked by rabbits, even in a bleak and, to most, cheerless day .... .  I suppose that this value, in my case, is equivalent to what others get by churchgoing & prayer.  Hank Thoreau, 1857

Online Pat B

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Re: Arrow Nock help needed
« Reply #2 on: September 22, 2019, 07:30:56 am »
With plastic nocks you can put them in hot water for a short time and spread the ears apart so they will fit the string.
Make the most of all that comes and the least of all that goes!    Pat Brennan  Brevard, NC

Offline PEARL DRUMS/PEARLY/PD/DRUMS

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Re: Arrow Nock help needed
« Reply #3 on: September 22, 2019, 08:29:51 am »
A serving will almost always "pack down" a little after 100-150 shots and the nock fit will loosen. How many times have you shot with the new string? I would be sure the serving is settled before you adjust the throat size. A tight nock fit will cause erratic arrow flight, same as a loose nock fit.
Only when the last tree has died and the last river has been poisoned and the last fish has been caught will we realize we cannot eat money.

Online Pat B

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Re: Arrow Nock help needed
« Reply #4 on: September 22, 2019, 08:53:36 am »
I prefer a loose nock fit and that's how I make my self nocks. I rarely get good flight from a tight fit.
Make the most of all that comes and the least of all that goes!    Pat Brennan  Brevard, NC

Offline Hawkdancer

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Re: Arrow Nock help needed
« Reply #5 on: September 22, 2019, 10:42:49 am »
If your serving is well waxed, you may be able to gently squeeze it down with a pliers.  Otherwise, I think Pat B and Pearl got it covered.  Nock should more or less just hold the arrow on the string without dropping off.
Hawkdancer
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Online Pat B

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Re: Arrow Nock help needed
« Reply #6 on: September 22, 2019, 12:13:48 pm »
Jerry, my arrows won't stay on the string by themselves. I have to hold them because they are so loose but that's how I like it. I also nock my arrow over the nock point unlike most other folks.
Make the most of all that comes and the least of all that goes!    Pat Brennan  Brevard, NC

Offline Woodely

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Re: Arrow Nock help needed
« Reply #7 on: September 22, 2019, 03:46:50 pm »
I like my arrows to stay on,  I nock an arrow and hold the bow towards the ground and give it a few shakes it should come off after 2-3 shakes, if not then its to tight.  If its over tight then it can affect arrow flight but a snug fit does not have any affect on it in my experience.
"Doing bad work is an exercise in futility, but honestly making mistakes is trying your best."