Author Topic: Over 55-60 pounds for western hunting?  (Read 232 times)

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Offline StickMark

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Over 55-60 pounds for western hunting?
« on: August 11, 2019, 12:31:39 pm »
Glued up a hickory backing on a dense hickory old bow.  I mean it dense; it doesn't want to give up poundage. Right now it will come out near 63-65#, if I leave as is. It is 55.5 ttt, for 23.5, 24" draw.
 
Any advantage on higher draw weight for hunting? On another bow, I glued a second course of sinew, and it is at 51#, so I calculate.  The bows I have below 45 start feeling "weak", and I think I can go up in draw weight.  I'd like my bows to be close to each other, for ease of arrow making and trajectory. 

What are your thoughts?
« Last Edit: August 11, 2019, 12:56:17 pm by StickMark »

Online sleek

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Re: Over 55-60 pounds for western hunting?
« Reply #1 on: August 11, 2019, 01:28:28 pm »
Unless it has a slow cast for its draw weight, anything over 40# is just extra in my opinion. 400 grains scooting at 150 fps with a sharp cut on contact point has done the job many many times. I'd prefer 160 fps and higher really. Aim, hold time, finger pinch and accuracy all work against you at higher draw weights...
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Online Pat B

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Re: Over 55-60 pounds for western hunting?
« Reply #2 on: August 11, 2019, 01:32:20 pm »
I agree with sleek but I'd go as high in weight as I comfortably can. You still have to remember the excitement of the hunt and cold weather, both make it difficult to draw and shoot accurately.
Make the most of all that comes and the least of all that goes!    Pat Brennan  Brevard, NC

Offline Hawkdancer

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Re: Over 55-60 pounds for western hunting?
« Reply #3 on: August 11, 2019, 01:52:36 pm »
The legal draw weight in Colorado for big game is 35# with steel points required.  My bows are 45-50#, but I won't hunt big game in the archery season this year(bum knee).  I agree with Sleek and Pat B on comfort and weight.  Weather wise, we can get 90 degree days or blizzards in September!
Hawkdancer
Life is far too serious to be taken that way!
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Offline StickMark

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Re: Over 55-60 pounds for western hunting?
« Reply #4 on: August 11, 2019, 03:26:44 pm »
To be honest, I expected some comments such as "Man up!" and "men are weaklings nowadays."  ;D

I am in the final last few inches, and I am at 48-51# after final sanding, tillering check.  Going to glue some rawhhide on the back. 

Appreciate the thoughts.  I get to thinking and my thinking can over ride my common sense. Keeping the general draw weight of my hunting bows around 47-51 will work.





Online sleek

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Re: Over 55-60 pounds for western hunting?
« Reply #5 on: August 11, 2019, 03:29:32 pm »
To be honest, I expected some comments such as "Man up!" and "men are weaklings nowadays."  ;D

I am in the final last few inches, and I am at 48-51# after final sanding, tillering check.  Going to glue some rawhhide on the back. 

Appreciate the thoughts.  I get to thinking and my thinking can over ride my common sense. Keeping the general draw weight of my hunting bows around 47-51 will work.


That's a perfect weight range.
Tread softly and carry a bent stick.

Dont seek your happiness through the approval of others

Online Pat B

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Re: Over 55-60 pounds for western hunting?
« Reply #6 on: August 11, 2019, 05:04:39 pm »
 Don't worry about what people think, just put a deadly arrow through the boiler room.  :OK
Make the most of all that comes and the least of all that goes!    Pat Brennan  Brevard, NC

Offline StickMark

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Re: Over 55-60 pounds for western hunting?
« Reply #7 on: August 11, 2019, 07:10:20 pm »
Yea, I am comfortable with 46-50# range.  I just get curious about the higher weights.  That article on the Mogollon bow in PA had me thinking, with the author's replica pulling 60# at 24". But, when in the gym, those 60 dumbbells are unused by me, and the 45 pounders seem pretty heavy.

Got shot placement?


Offline PEARL DRUMS/PEARLY/PD/DRUMS

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Re: Over 55-60 pounds for western hunting?
« Reply #8 on: August 12, 2019, 10:58:48 am »
I wouldn't take a pound under 55 out west, nothing under 50# for whitetails on farmland settings. I've shot quite a few large game critters with bows the last 30 years and have seen lots of "things" happen. What Ive learned is draw all the weight you can comfortably pull. I wouldn't hunt anything with a 40# bow except small game. Yes, I've heard of several people who took big game with 35-40 bows, so I don't need examples cited. I have created dozens of my own by hunting big game.
« Last Edit: August 12, 2019, 11:03:57 am by PEARL DRUMS/PEARLY/PD/DRUMS »
Only when the last tree has died and the last river has been poisoned and the last fish has been caught will we realize we cannot eat money.

Offline PEARL DRUMS/PEARLY/PD/DRUMS

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Re: Over 55-60 pounds for western hunting?
« Reply #9 on: August 12, 2019, 11:00:05 am »
What I said goes double for a 23-24" draw. You lose a TON of power at such a short draw. 
Only when the last tree has died and the last river has been poisoned and the last fish has been caught will we realize we cannot eat money.

Offline StickMark

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Re: Over 55-60 pounds for western hunting?
« Reply #10 on: August 12, 2019, 09:39:24 pm »
Pearl Drums,

That power advantage of longer draws vs shorter draws needing more draw is something I also have been thinking about.
I shifted a few things in my personal archery form, and I drew my sinew bow 25". Got 52# out of it.  The arrows really zip!  I am impressed, and the trajectory flattens as well.  For higher desert and desert mulie deer, I have the power and trajectory that I want.   ;D 

I anticipate that bow will gain a pound or two before January, as humidity drops. 

My preferred shafting is a plant called mulefat.  A narrowed handle and over 47-51# allows me to utilize thicker shafts.  This climate can lead to brittle shafts if too thin, so thicker heavier shafts have an advantage here.

I read that the Finns used higher draws because they had to make the shafts from conifers heavy. Heavier shafts just feel right, and confidence is there for me.
  Arrow weight was a big part of my posting this question.