Author Topic: primitive snaring  (Read 792 times)

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Offline GlisGlis

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primitive snaring
« on: September 08, 2019, 12:48:53 pm »
Knowing that trapping is highly regulated and in many cases forbidden let's examine the topic from a theoretical and historical prospective
How to make snares in a primitive situation (no modern tool including wire or paracord)?
Every string I'm able to make is pretty coarse.
the eyelet of the snare must be pretty big to slid easily but that also make easy for the game to open the snare
I cant come up with a practical locking system
A spring system to lift the animal is enough to prevent it from getting untied?
Do you know of method actually used in the past?

Offline Deerhunter21

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Re: primitive snaring
« Reply #1 on: September 08, 2019, 02:16:49 pm »
I would think trapping was mostly paiute deadfalls and deadfalls. Some deadfalls got so big they could take a deer.
"Only when the last tree has died and the last river been poisoned and the last fish been caught will we realise we cannot eat money." Cree Native-American Proverb

A amature practices untill he gets it right. A master practices untill he never gets it wrong.

Russell - 15 years

Offline dylanholderman

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Re: primitive snaring
« Reply #2 on: September 08, 2019, 03:15:44 pm »
There was a ray mears episode where he talked about a Native American snare meant for rabbits and other small game that would lift there front end off of the ground preventing the critter from chewing through the cord.

Offline Marc St Louis

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Re: primitive snaring
« Reply #3 on: September 08, 2019, 08:15:19 pm »
Possibly using a slip knot for the loop might work when using a natural fiber snare.  That way once the animal gets in and sets the snare then it will not slip loose

I've found that snaring Hares in the Winter up here with spring-pole snares doesn't work very well as the pole freeze in its bent shape so I would think that some type of pivoting pole using a weight would probably be what natives used, that's if they used them
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Offline GlisGlis

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Re: primitive snaring
« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2019, 02:56:27 am »
Quote
Possibly using a slip knot for the loop might work when using a natural fiber snare
I also thought that but it seems that the knot tighten often too early preventing complete grab around the neck
it could be my bad setup. Have to try again

Quote
I would think that some type of pivoting pole using a weight would probably be what natives used
Yes. even in non freezing habitats a sapling bent for long time would eventually loose alot of springback

Quote
There was a ray mears episode where he talked about a Native American snare
Definitly good documentaries. I like alot Ray Mears. Will try to find this specific one

Offline Sidmand

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Re: primitive snaring
« Reply #5 on: September 09, 2019, 08:04:55 am »
https://mywoodlandgear.com/howto-koolyomka/

Not a snare, but a very effective small game trap/deadfall
"Criticism is something we can avoid easily by saying nothing, doing nothing, and being nothing." --> Aristotle

Offline Ed Brooks

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Re: primitive snaring
« Reply #6 on: September 09, 2019, 09:31:25 am »
Shawn Woods, on yew tube has cool primitive traps, and uses them on video. Not sure he uses natural cordage but you can. Ive also seen on, one of the history channel shows, they used willow branch to make a snare and catch or have a rabbit in it at least. Good luck! Ed
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Centralia WA,

Offline Marc St Louis

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Re: primitive snaring
« Reply #7 on: September 10, 2019, 07:21:40 am »
Dead falls don't work in the winter when snow is on the ground.
Home of heat-treating, Corbeil, On.  Canada

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Offline GlisGlis

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Re: primitive snaring
« Reply #8 on: September 10, 2019, 08:24:36 am »
thnakyou Ed I follow Shawn videos. Probably a version of the deadfalls scissor could be the ticket for small and medium game in primitive situation

thankyou Sidmand
I already knew of koolymka from the documentary "Happy people. a year in the taiga". A real good movie

Offline Mesophilic

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Re: primitive snaring
« Reply #9 on: September 10, 2019, 01:43:20 pm »
What about a noose like the one I made below? It slides fine with coarse commercial made grass twine.  I'm sure you could polish/burnish the wood around the hole a bit to make it even more slippery for use with handmade cordage.

Trying is the first step to failure
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Offline Deerhunter21

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Re: primitive snaring
« Reply #10 on: September 10, 2019, 01:59:16 pm »
Oooooo! Cool!
"Only when the last tree has died and the last river been poisoned and the last fish been caught will we realise we cannot eat money." Cree Native-American Proverb

A amature practices untill he gets it right. A master practices untill he never gets it wrong.

Russell - 15 years

Offline GlisGlis

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Re: primitive snaring
« Reply #11 on: September 11, 2019, 02:39:45 am »
Quote
What about a noose like the one I made below? It slides fine with coarse commercial made grass twine.  I'm sure you could polish/burnish the wood around the hole a bit to make it even more slippery for use with handmade cordage.

that could be a good solution.
I'm not sure though that making holes is a fast solution to produce many snares in primitive conditions (without a steel awl)

Offline GlisGlis

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Re: primitive snaring
« Reply #12 on: September 13, 2019, 07:19:31 am »
just found on youtube a guy snaring with sinew cordage (search for "lynx sinew snare" or "squirrel sinew snare")
So primitive snaring is a thing
I also made some elm bark cordage. That stuff is really strong even at very thin diameter.
I think it's definitly usable for snaring and for bow string too