Author Topic: Recurve differences  (Read 671 times)

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Offline DC

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Recurve differences
« on: September 27, 2019, 04:08:22 pm »
 I just noticed that the bow I'm working on has a little more recurve on one end than the other. Before I spend a bunch of time and risk the string alignment what difference does it make? Would the tiller be out even though I tillered it as is? ie good tiller with uneven recurves?
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Offline Sagebrush

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Re: Recurve differences
« Reply #1 on: September 27, 2019, 05:07:22 pm »
Thanks dc, I've wondered the same. Before I was comfortable bending recurves, I left a few natural recurves and incorporated them in on my top limb on an asymmetrical design. These shot really well and I've thought about even doing this intentionally. I know I'll probably get blasted for this but it's just my two pennies.

Offline bradsmith2010

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Re: Recurve differences
« Reply #2 on: September 27, 2019, 05:34:33 pm »
I am guessing you can get it to shoot well,,, with the difference in recurves

Offline Woodely

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Re: Recurve differences
« Reply #3 on: September 27, 2019, 05:57:58 pm »
I am guessing you can get it to shoot well,,, with the difference in recurves
True enough I have a takedown having 2 different limbs,  because the matching ones broke.  The upper limb is also 1 1/2" longer,  the bow shoots fine.  Having said that having 2 perfectly built limbs does not always mean it will be a better shooting bow.   Experimenting proves what works and what does not.
"Doing bad work is an exercise in futility, but honestly making mistakes is trying your best."

Offline Pat B

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Re: Recurve differences
« Reply #4 on: September 27, 2019, 10:01:23 pm »
You should be able to tell if it balanced when you draw the bow and shoot.
Make the most of all that comes and the least of all that goes!    Pat Brennan  Brevard, NC

Offline PEARL DRUMS/PEARLY/PD/DRUMS

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Re: Recurve differences
« Reply #5 on: September 29, 2019, 07:10:15 am »
It makes no difference how much each limb has or if its even. I have a buckthorn bow that has one RD limb and one straight limb, just shot it last night. Tiller each limb to math its unbraced profile and make it balance in your bow hand. You will never feel the difference, only your eyes will.
Only when the last tree has died and the last river has been poisoned and the last fish has been caught will we realize we cannot eat money.

Offline Selfbowman

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Re: Recurve differences
« Reply #6 on: September 29, 2019, 10:09:18 am »
Ok question. Do these bows have more shock when shot ? If not if we where to cut the limbs off would they weigh the same? Or would a great tiller even the weight distribution between the two limbs? Arvin
Well I'll say!!  Osage is king!!

Offline DC

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Re: Recurve differences
« Reply #7 on: September 29, 2019, 10:29:50 am »
I have no experience with this but I'd venture a guess that if a bow was tillered for one recurve and you cut that off and shortend the other limb equally that you would be almost starting from scratch.
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If you don't have any questions you must not be paying attention.

Offline Pat B

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Re: Recurve differences
« Reply #8 on: September 29, 2019, 11:04:09 am »
If the bow is tillered properly if shouldn't matter.
Make the most of all that comes and the least of all that goes!    Pat Brennan  Brevard, NC

Offline PEARL DRUMS/PEARLY/PD/DRUMS

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Re: Recurve differences
« Reply #9 on: September 29, 2019, 12:08:23 pm »
I would never know the buckthorn bow I was shooting wasn't symmetrical, it feels like any bow does. No two bow limbs ever weight the same if the bow is tillered correctly. In the end all your trying to achieve is balance and nothing more regardless of which limb is bending with more or less force.
Only when the last tree has died and the last river has been poisoned and the last fish has been caught will we realize we cannot eat money.