Author Topic: Shoot shafts  (Read 1988 times)

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Offline Mesophilic

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Shoot shafts
« on: December 07, 2019, 06:59:13 pm »
Completed my first batch of shoot shafts, made from wild rose shoots.  I still have two more raw shafts but I need to turn down the dismeter a little more, right now they're pretty thick and definitely war bow spined.  I haven't put any cresting or finish on them, wanted to see if they were worth all this trouble first.

Out of the five, three of them shoot excellent.  The other two are too heavy spine.  Correct me if I'm wrong, but for a right handed shooter, shooting split finger Mediterranean,  arrows impacting left of POA means spine is too heavy, right?

On one of the heavy spined shafts I started scraping and sanding the diameter down, but as I did this it kept shooting higher and more left until it missed the target bale all together.   Should I have just scraped the strong side? Or just the weak side?



Trying is the first step to failure
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Offline StickMark

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Re: Shoot shafts
« Reply #1 on: December 07, 2019, 09:19:10 pm »
On that one arrow going left, that happens with shoots sometimes.  Some shafts just kinda want to miss, no matter what. If I see that, I break them. Maybe some flaw buried in the wood messing the flight.

Offline PaSteve

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Re: Shoot shafts
« Reply #2 on: December 08, 2019, 08:37:40 am »
"Correct me if I'm wrong, but for a right handed shooter, shooting split finger Mediterranean,  arrows impacting left of POA means spine is too heavy, right?"
Yes, you are correct. I also agree with what StickMark said about some shoots just don't fly straight for whatever reason. It'll drive you crazy at times but I guess that's the nature of wood. Arrows look nice btw.
"It seems so much more obvious with bows than with other matters, that we are the guardians of the prize we seek." Dean Torges

Offline Mesophilic

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Re: Shoot shafts
« Reply #3 on: December 08, 2019, 08:51:10 am »
On that one arrow going left, that happens with shoots sometimes.  Some shafts just kinda want to miss, no matter what. If I see that, I break them. Maybe some flaw buried in the wood messing the flight.

I suppose this works out ok.  In the spring I want to destruction test a couple anyway, to see if they hold up better under profanely low humidity and high elevation than the other wood and bamboo shafts I've used.  At least this way I don't have to destroy the good ones.
Trying is the first step to failure
-Homer Simpson-

Offline Pat B

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Re: Shoot shafts
« Reply #4 on: December 08, 2019, 09:35:04 am »
Have you tried shooting the arrows that don't shoot well with the cock feather in. I and others have found that some shoot and cane arrows will shoot well if you do this. Generally the stiff side of the arrow goes against the bow but in some cases flipping it over will allow it to shoot better.
Make the most of all that comes and the least of all that goes!    Pat Brennan  Brevard, NC

Offline Hawkdancer

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Re: Shoot shafts
« Reply #5 on: December 08, 2019, 11:55:25 am »
Have you tried shooting the arrows that don't shoot well with the cock feather in. I and others have found that some shoot and cane arrows will shoot well if you do this. Generally the stiff side of the arrow goes against the bow but in some cases flipping it over will allow it to shoot better.
Pat,
Do you re-fletch the arrow if you find it does shoot better cockfeather in?  I suppose we will all have that problem sooner or later with the wild shoot!
Hawkdancer
Life is far too serious to be taken that way!
Jerry

Offline Mesophilic

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Re: Shoot shafts
« Reply #6 on: December 08, 2019, 02:52:04 pm »
Have you tried shooting the arrows that don't shoot well with the cock feather in. I and others have found that some shoot and cane arrows will shoot well if you do this. Generally the stiff side of the arrow goes against the bow but in some cases flipping it over will allow it to shoot better.

I did, but did not get a positive effect.
Trying is the first step to failure
-Homer Simpson-

Offline artcher1

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Re: Shoot shafts
« Reply #7 on: December 08, 2019, 03:34:08 pm »
Nice work Mesophilic! One other thing you might want to try. I call this method "field tuning". Take the arrow(s) that are impacting right and gently compress their stiff sides (side against the bow).  Keep compressing that side until the arrow impact center. Next do the same thing to the side that sets on the shelf to bring the arrow's impact lower. Downside to this method is that those arrows may now be bow specific. Give it a try......Art

Offline Pat B

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Re: Shoot shafts
« Reply #8 on: December 08, 2019, 06:13:51 pm »
Jerry, I don't refletch. I put an indicator on the nock as to how the arrow rests against the bow. Once released the arrow shouldn't touch the bow at all anyway so the cock feather in shouldn't  affect the arrow flight.
 Glad you chimed in Art. You always have a resolution when it comes to most shoot shaft problems.  :OK
Make the most of all that comes and the least of all that goes!    Pat Brennan  Brevard, NC

Offline StickMark

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Re: Shoot shafts
« Reply #9 on: December 08, 2019, 09:16:03 pm »
Meso, usually that 'weird one that doesn't shoot straight' is one out of twenty or so, for me. Not a whole batch.  I should have been more clear.  Nice arrows.

Offline Mesophilic

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Re: Shoot shafts
« Reply #10 on: December 08, 2019, 11:12:54 pm »
Thanks,  Art, I'll give it a try.

This is pretty addictive,  I'm tryjng to locate more wild rose bushes but have only turned up some little scrubby ones so far.  Also keeping an eye out for black currant, but like wise only scrubby ones, too.
Trying is the first step to failure
-Homer Simpson-

Offline Hawkdancer

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Re: Shoot shafts
« Reply #11 on: December 09, 2019, 12:11:19 am »
Art, always glad to hear from them that "have been here, done that"!  Saves the new guys time and effort if they listen and learn!
Mesophil, those black currants make good mead properly mixed with honey and yeast, and some water!  If you find them, water them!  However, I  understand that one species of currant is a host/vector for blister rust. Blister rust control meant chopping out currants, which in turn affected wildlife!
Pat,
I haven't had a shoot so far out that I could say it was a flyer - yet!  I guess I have been playing "Kentucky Windage" too long!  Of course, it helps to number the arrows! (SH) >:D
Hawkdancer
Hawkdancer
Life is far too serious to be taken that way!
Jerry

Offline artcher1

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Re: Shoot shafts
« Reply #12 on: December 09, 2019, 09:36:46 am »
Good or bad, these shoot arrows have a certain potential, and that potential can and often does change with different bows. Sometimes you can do everything exactly right with shoot arrows, and they won't live up to expectations. But find the right bow, and they can surprise you. I know when I hunted, I had to match the arrows to the bows. I liked hunting with multiple bows, and that meant multiple sets of arrows......Art

Offline bownarra

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Re: Shoot shafts
« Reply #13 on: December 11, 2019, 12:45:18 pm »
Thanks,  Art, I'll give it a try.

This is pretty addictive,  I'm tryjng to locate more wild rose bushes but have only turned up some little scrubby ones so far.  Also keeping an eye out for black currant, but like wise only scrubby ones, too.

The trick is to find good bushes and 'coppice' them. 2nd growth is straighter. 3rd growth even better.

Offline Pat B

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Re: Shoot shafts
« Reply #14 on: December 11, 2019, 01:35:51 pm »
...and don't forget to harvest only 2nd year growth or older for shafts.
Make the most of all that comes and the least of all that goes!    Pat Brennan  Brevard, NC