Author Topic: Some shoot shaft arrows  (Read 598 times)

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Offline BowEd

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Some shoot shaft arrows
« on: February 10, 2020, 07:19:01 am »
Hello...Here's a mess of shoot shaft arrows made and tuned.4" long 3 way fletched.All 50# spined at 30" long tip to tip.Most all weighing 550 to 625 grains.Most all full length tapered 9/32" to 11/32".All self nocked and wrapped.Except for the bamboo and hill cane left natural color all the others left natural were white so they were stained to some degree with leather dye.
From left to right...
Bamboo,hill cane,multi flora rose,ocean spray,dogwood and some sourwood,and plum.

« Last Edit: February 11, 2020, 07:42:35 am by BowEd »
BowEd
You got to stand for something or you'll fall for anything.
Ed

Offline bjrogg

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Re: Some shoot shaft arrows
« Reply #1 on: February 10, 2020, 08:00:50 am »
Looks like youíve been busy Ed. Any favorites? Iíve been using my supply of River cane from trapper Rob lately. Iíve got some I think hill cane from Pat B I need to give a try yet to.
Bjrogg
A hot cup of coffee and a beautiful sunrise

Offline DC

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Re: Some shoot shaft arrows
« Reply #2 on: February 10, 2020, 10:32:38 am »
They look great. That's a lot of arrows. I've actually got more bows than I have arrows.
Vancouver Island
If you don't have any questions you must not be paying attention.

Offline Trapper Rob

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Re: Some shoot shaft arrows
« Reply #3 on: February 10, 2020, 11:02:23 am »
Nice looking arrows

Offline Hawkdancer

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Re: Some shoot shaft arrows
« Reply #4 on: February 10, 2020, 12:53:26 pm »
Very nice winter's work!  A good variety of shoots.
Hawkdancer
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Jerry

Offline BowEd

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Re: Some shoot shaft arrows
« Reply #5 on: February 11, 2020, 02:17:27 am »
The plum are the most dense and heaviest.I did a specific gravity density test on a piece and it showed me 1.0 density.Someday I'd like to find a piece of that big enough for a bow.
BowEd
You got to stand for something or you'll fall for anything.
Ed

Offline Tracker0721

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Re: Some shoot shaft arrows
« Reply #6 on: February 11, 2020, 06:21:47 am »
Whoa! Thatís impressive, getting stocked up for the year?
May my presence go unnoticed, may my shot be true, may the blood trail be short. Amen.

Offline WhistlingBadger

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Re: Some shoot shaft arrows
« Reply #7 on: February 11, 2020, 06:56:39 am »
Those are great looking arrows, Ed.  THanks for sharing.
T
~Thomas
Wind River Country, Wyoming
Fall down six times.  Stand up seven.

Offline TimBo

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Re: Some shoot shaft arrows
« Reply #8 on: February 12, 2020, 07:35:57 pm »
Sweet!  That's a lot of work for sure.

Offline Tracker0721

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Re: Some shoot shaft arrows
« Reply #9 on: February 12, 2020, 09:16:48 pm »
Dozen shafts and a half dozen heads done. Only like 6 dozen more shafts to do!
May my presence go unnoticed, may my shot be true, may the blood trail be short. Amen.

Offline BowEd

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Re: Some shoot shaft arrows
« Reply #10 on: February 13, 2020, 06:29:02 am »
Thanks fellas....I usually like to keep quite a few bundled in groups of 7 cure drying over a longer period.Sort of a small type assembly line.

Final heat correctioning usually will keep them straight.I've never needed to do any grooving on mine.
I use different colored fletching/spine weight/and mass weight to identify what is what.
I did'nt show some hazelnut shoots that make excellent arrows also.
Most all shoot shafts are tougher than any split timber shafts.Although many woods can be used also for split timber shafts.I've experimented successfully with hickory/elm//DF/hemlock/honey locust/black locust//maple/walnut/spruce/ash/ and even osage[too heavy for spine gotten for a 50# bow].Always looking for a nice balance of diameter/spine/and mass weight.Some are too thick IMO for their spine.
Laminated bamboo flooring make excellent heavy mass weight shafts.
IMO split timber hickory shafts are about as tough as a split timber shaft can get.Good diameter with good mass weight and spine too.Think it might have to do with it's interlocking grain qualities.
« Last Edit: February 13, 2020, 10:57:41 am by BowEd »
BowEd
You got to stand for something or you'll fall for anything.
Ed

Offline Pat B

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Re: Some shoot shaft arrows
« Reply #11 on: February 14, 2020, 08:42:57 am »
You always make nice arrows, Ed. What do you think of the hill cane? How does it compare with the other shoot shafting?
Make the most of all that comes and the least of all that goes!    Pat Brennan  Brevard, NC

Offline gifford

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Re: Some shoot shaft arrows
« Reply #12 on: February 14, 2020, 02:01:31 pm »
Ed - really nice looking arrows, and it looks like you've got another set or three already drying. Kudos. Making a shoot arrow is a lot harder than it looks imho.

Offline BowEd

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Re: Some shoot shaft arrows
« Reply #13 on: February 14, 2020, 07:56:03 pm »
Pat B....Thanks,the hill cane shafts made excellent arrows.Easy to work with and straighten.All relatively close in all final dimensions of diameter/mass weight/and spine.They must of been harvested all in the same area.I'll use them 3D shooting or hunting with my FG bow toting buddies.They shoot carbides looking like wood but are'nt wood.All shafts being same diameter the hill cane mass weight wise came in just slightly less than dogwood but still in the 550 to 575 grain weight range...perfect.Beautful looking shafts.
Although I do like to keep a few carbides around to shoot to compare the shoot shafts flight too.It's a good test.
gifford...Thanks,it seems when a person gets one made from a bunch you will have a template to go by[if they are harvested all in the same area].I make them with a pocket knife,and sand paper/drill/grain scale/spine tester and sometimes a sizing tool[chunk of moose horn with holes of different diameter drilled through it.It is time consuming.I do them in stages of straightening/spining/sanding/spining and weighing/bareshaft shooting/and then finishing and fletching.
I keep a close watch on my dogwood patches.I count around 9 patches.All growing in ditches along gravel roads or along creeks seen easily from the road within 2 miles of me.I guess 1 advantage about not having too many more self arrow makers around is that they don't get raided by anyone but me.
« Last Edit: February 15, 2020, 05:28:00 am by BowEd »
BowEd
You got to stand for something or you'll fall for anything.
Ed

Offline neuse

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Re: Some shoot shaft arrows
« Reply #14 on: February 15, 2020, 06:32:51 am »
Very nice arrows.
Lots of work.