Author Topic: Tuning for Trade Points  (Read 582 times)

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Offline CrackedBowyer

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Tuning for Trade Points
« on: October 12, 2020, 11:48:39 am »
So if this post needs to be moved to a different section, feel free. I figured this would be as good as any for posting it.

Let's base this on a hypothetical situation rather than actual bow and arrow specs. I am more interested in the process y'all come up with than actually making it work.
Everyone talks about bareshaft tuning a bow with primarily glue on or screw in points. Has anyone ever thought about how to, or tried for that matter, bareshaft tuning for trade points? Or would you just build your trade point arrows and tune the length to a reasonable degree and fletch them and call it good?

Obviously, bareshaft tuning with broadheads could be dangerous, but lets say you have an open field with nothing but your target downrange.

I am interested to see what everyone here thinks. Thanks.
If you're not learning, you're dead.

Online Pat B

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Re: Tuning for Trade Points
« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2020, 01:24:47 pm »
I have never bare shaft tuned an arrow but I have mounted trade points, stone points and glue on commercial points. And every arrow I plan to hunt with I make sure it shoots well before it goes in my quiver. I make sure my arrows are spined correctly for the intended bow, make sure they are the same length(I prefer 29"-30" for my 26" draw) and make sure they spin true on my finger tip then go give them a test shot. Most make the grade, the remainder are target arrows or fluflus.
Make the most of all that comes and the least of all that goes!    Pat Brennan  Brevard, NC

Offline Mesophilic

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Re: Tuning for Trade Points
« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2020, 06:29:37 pm »
For my hunting arrows, I tune first with glue on field points.  I use hot melt for this as the points can be removed easily with heat.

If I'm using commercial made wood shafts I usually skip the bare shaft because if the spine is right I'm pretty confident in them.

With shoots I bare shaft test every time.

Once I've shot the arrows enough and I'm satisfied I remove the field point and haft on a trade point.

Then I test them again on a broadhead target before doing the final edge polish.  I'll shoot them quite a few times over several days to account for my mood, the mood of the shafts, and the mood of the bow.

So far this has worked out well for me.
Trying is the first step to failure
-Homer Simpson-

Offline bradsmith2010

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Re: Tuning for Trade Points
« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2020, 07:07:37 pm »
just wrap some duct tape on the tip,, the same weight as the trade point to get the arrow to shoot,,
then put feathers and trade point on, test to make sure its shooting good, and hunt,,

Offline Pappy

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Re: Tuning for Trade Points
« Reply #4 on: October 13, 2020, 04:28:21 am »
I do the same as some above, use field points for bare shafting of the same weight of trade point or broad head, then just change points when it flies well with field point and fletch before shooting trade point or broad head, you can't bare shaft with trade point or broad head, the head will take over the guidance and the arrow will go crazy. ;)
 Pappy
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TwinOaks Bowhunters
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Offline CrackedBowyer

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Re: Tuning for Trade Points
« Reply #5 on: October 14, 2020, 10:11:35 am »
Thanks for the responses!

Because I had the materials on hand, I gave brad's method a try and it worked really well. Definitely a way to try some things quickly.
I think for ease in the future, probably using the method of tuning with field points and then hafting a trade point on will work best, plus the transition is already tapered down for the trade point.

Meso, why would you skip bareshafting for the commercial shafts but bareshaft shoots? Is it because of the taper and not trusting the spine of the shoots? I'm assuming you psine test the shoot shafts here.

PatB, do you find the extra length helps with paradox recovery or is there some other method to the madness leaving them longer than needed? I'd also imagine that if you did cut them shorter than that, you'd need a different static spine shaft since the length is going to play a part in determining the dynamic spine?

One more question, when you do haft your trade points, what methods are y'all using for cutting the slot and gluing them in place?

Hopefully I don't ask too many questions.
If you're not learning, you're dead.

Offline paulc

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Re: Tuning for Trade Points
« Reply #6 on: October 14, 2020, 06:16:50 pm »
I do the same as some above, use field points for bare shafting of the same weight of trade point or broad head, then just change points when it flies well with field point and fletch before shooting trade point or broad head, you can't bare shaft with trade point or broad head, the head will take over the guidance and the arrow will go crazy. ;)
 Pappy

I bet this is what happened to me!  I tried shooting my crepe myrtle shafts with just my stone points on them and they went all over the place...TERRIBLE shooting except for a single shaft...time to try again!  Thanks Pappy!!

Online Pat B

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Re: Tuning for Trade Points
« Reply #7 on: October 14, 2020, 08:09:07 pm »
I use the same method for cutting in for trade and stone points and self nocks. I make a single bandsaw cut then open it to fit with a thin blade knife and sand paper folded over and over again to increase the opening to fit the point or string for the nock. I cut the slot for the point and for the nock the same direction. I do this because it's simpler for me.
I do leave the shaft longer to help it get around the bow plus I like the extra physical weight and yes I do have to predetermine the dynamic spine not only for the length but the point weight also.
Make the most of all that comes and the least of all that goes!    Pat Brennan  Brevard, NC

Offline Mesophilic

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Re: Tuning for Trade Points
« Reply #8 on: October 14, 2020, 11:51:16 pm »

Meso, why would you skip bareshafting for the commercial shafts but bareshaft shoots? Is it because of the taper and not trusting the spine of the shoots? I'm assuming you psine test the shoot shafts here.


I don't think I can mention the guy I order from since he's not a sponsor, but douglas fir shafts I order tend to be consistent enough that I don't bother bare shafting unless I change a variable.  Used to bare shaft test religiously, but found that as long as I spine test the strong side and fletch accordingly, I've had good results without the extra steps.

Shoots seem to be more alive and unpredictable.  Like they each have their own soul.  And consequently bare shaft them to see what that soul wants to do in flight.
Trying is the first step to failure
-Homer Simpson-

Offline Muleman

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Re: Tuning for Trade Points
« Reply #9 on: October 26, 2020, 09:13:01 pm »
on your guys trade points are you just wrapping the back with sinew or do you put a metal collar over the arrow?

Online Pat B

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Re: Tuning for Trade Points
« Reply #10 on: October 27, 2020, 08:51:02 am »
A wrap to hold the point tight and true then an inch or more wrap behind the point.
Make the most of all that comes and the least of all that goes!    Pat Brennan  Brevard, NC