Author Topic: Year of the Patriot: Gardens  (Read 21697 times)

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Offline Eric Krewson

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Re: Year of the Patriot: Gardens
« Reply #135 on: July 16, 2021, 05:07:40 pm »
I often deliver produce to my friends, like me they are elderly. Today I am trying to give away tomatoes, I have overloaded my normal recipients and am looking for new ones. So far today I gave away squash and green tomatoes at the gym and tomatoes to my lady barber.

I still have a lot to get rid of, I eat the ones that have a bug bite or spot on them and only give away the perfect ones. This is two days worth picking off 4 plants.
 


Offline Pat B

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Re: Year of the Patriot: Gardens
« Reply #136 on: July 16, 2021, 05:17:30 pm »
Boy, I wish I was your neighbor!
Make the most of all that comes and the least of all that goes!    Pat Brennan  Brevard, NC

Offline YosemiteBen

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Re: Year of the Patriot: Gardens
« Reply #137 on: July 17, 2021, 05:26:02 pm »
Indeed Mr Krewson!

Our tomatoes are green and growing. But Tomato Gravy!

Offline bjrogg

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Re: Year of the Patriot: Gardens
« Reply #138 on: July 19, 2021, 07:56:29 am »
We finished wheat harvest yesterday. The last 140 acres didnít make milling quality wheat. It was still good the day we started it, but we no more than got started and we got rained out. That was a very warm humid day and the wheat quality plummeted after it.

Bjrogg
A hot cup of coffee and a beautiful sunrise

Offline bjrogg

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Re: Year of the Patriot: Gardens
« Reply #139 on: July 20, 2021, 09:55:56 am »
Iím not sure if I should be posting on this thread or not. Last year it seemed like I was welcome to show some of the farm along with the gardenís. I welcome sharing what for many has become a much removed and often misunderstood profession. If it isnít appropriate I will halt.

Their was the pair watching me last evening. I think they have a nest nearby. This seems to be their favorite tree stand.

Bjrogg
A hot cup of coffee and a beautiful sunrise

Offline bjrogg

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Re: Year of the Patriot: Gardens
« Reply #140 on: July 20, 2021, 10:05:41 am »
Our next crop to harvest will be Rye.

Really the only market around here for it is cover crop seed. We generally only plant enough to provide seed for our cover crops and a couple of neighbors.

Maybe I should explain what a cover crop is.

Cover crops try to keep everything green as long as possible. They are a crop we plant that grows up after harvest or before planting of our real crop. We donít normally harvest the cover crops. They help to scavenge nutrients and stop soil erosion. They build organic mater and help the soil structure to help the ground perk. They are a crop we till into the soil.

This is Rye we saved for seed. It grows pretty tall. And then it quite often goes flat making it difficult to harvest.

Bjrogg

A hot cup of coffee and a beautiful sunrise

Offline Pat B

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Re: Year of the Patriot: Gardens
« Reply #141 on: July 20, 2021, 11:01:31 am »
BJ, as far as I'm concerned your "garden" is as interesting and important as the others. Our "real" farmers, the ones that feed the world are as much heroes as our other essential workers.  :OK
Make the most of all that comes and the least of all that goes!    Pat Brennan  Brevard, NC

Offline bjrogg

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Re: Year of the Patriot: Gardens
« Reply #142 on: July 20, 2021, 12:49:45 pm »
Thanks Pat. Believe me, not everyone seems to see it that way. Pretty sure thereís a bunch of people out there that hate what I do that have never met me, or know anything about my farming practices.
Bjrogg
A hot cup of coffee and a beautiful sunrise

Offline Marc St Louis

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Re: Year of the Patriot: Gardens
« Reply #143 on: July 20, 2021, 01:34:06 pm »
Thanks Pat. Believe me, not everyone seems to see it that way. Pretty sure thereís a bunch of people out there that hate what I do that have never met me, or know anything about my farming practices.
Bjrogg

Can't see why.  From what I have read over the years your farming practices seem to be pretty darn good
Home of heat-treating, Corbeil, On.  Canada

Marc@Ironwoodbowyer.com

Offline Pat B

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Re: Year of the Patriot: Gardens
« Reply #144 on: July 20, 2021, 02:23:35 pm »
BJ, put them in your shoes for a 24 hour day or a week during planting or harvest and see what they say. I've never been a farmer but can appreciate what a difficult, unappreciated job it is or can be. My hat's off to you and farmers around the world.  :OK
Make the most of all that comes and the least of all that goes!    Pat Brennan  Brevard, NC

Offline Strelets

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Re: Year of the Patriot: Gardens
« Reply #145 on: July 20, 2021, 04:01:50 pm »
Quote
Our next crop to harvest will be Rye.

Really the only market around here for it is cover crop seed.

The farm next to us in here in southern England grows rye to feed to their own hogs.

Offline bjrogg

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Re: Year of the Patriot: Gardens
« Reply #146 on: July 20, 2021, 09:28:55 pm »
Thanks Marc. I try to make modern technology and methods complement old practices. They really do work very well together.

Pat theyíd probably have to be in them for a few decades minimum. Iíve been doing this full time for 38 years. Really though I have been doing it for more like 53. I grew up with it and I have seen so many advancements. I was doing this long before GPS or GMOís . I hoed a lot of weeds.

Strelets Iím sure rye would make good feed. Iím sure it has lots of uses. Including making whiskey. I have been told my last name actually means rye farmer. Around here though non of the local grain elevators handle it.

Bjrogg
A hot cup of coffee and a beautiful sunrise

Offline bjrogg

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Re: Year of the Patriot: Gardens
« Reply #147 on: July 23, 2021, 07:24:32 am »
I donít think I have seen this pair before. They were by my dads farm yesterday cautiously sharing a meal. Not sure what it was, but the guy with the white head got his fill before the younger one could eat. There was also a hawk and several crows waiting in the trees for their turns.
Bjrogg
A hot cup of coffee and a beautiful sunrise

Offline bjrogg

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Re: Year of the Patriot: Gardens
« Reply #148 on: July 23, 2021, 07:25:38 am »
Picture
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Offline bjrogg

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Re: Year of the Patriot: Gardens
« Reply #149 on: July 23, 2021, 08:13:10 am »
Sorry for the double post.

This is another modern practice that I have adopted. Itís a modern product made from a material as old as man himself. This is a Class A Biosolid. It is refined and processed waste from  Detroit City.

In order to be a Class A Biosolid it must have all pathogens cooked out to a undetectable level. It also has a non vectoring product added to it to keep insects from being attracted to it. It can be used on any crops including your garden.

We were asked to try this product several years ago. I did some research and decided to try it on one of our fields. I could see the product works well as a fertilizer, but it isnít nearly as convenient as commercial fertilizer. I see it as a renewable resource though and the next year I bought some to use.

Here it is regulated by our state. Across our northern boarder Canada classifies it simply as a fertilizer.

Here we have storage rules saying it has to be spread within 21 days of receiving product. All fields must have recent soil samples to monitor phosphate and nutrient levels. Thereís a bunch of paperwork to do and documentation of applications. Because of Canadaís proximity to Detroit and it being classified as a fertilizer. Much of this product Iím told went north. Actually south.

Last year with the border closed (still is) that product needed a new home. I was told that half of Detroitís waste is incinerated and half made into this product. They are hoping to get to 100% this product. They make 200 tons a day Iím told.

I think this is a good use of what most people see as waste. Like I said though. It isnít nearly as convenient as commercial fertilizer. What would take a couple hours with conventional takes a few long days with the Biosolids application. Itís also dusty and has a odor. It is very bulky so itís a huge pile of stuff to store and apply. After using it now for several years Iím learning how to use it more efficiently. I bought a litter spreader designed for spreading chicken litter. Itís much better suited for the job than a commercial fertilizer spreader.

It works very well with my cover crops. The red clover will scavenge the nutrients and trap them for my real crop.

If you have used a rest room in the Motor City in the past several years. Who knows. There could be a small part of you on my farm now.

Bjrogg
A hot cup of coffee and a beautiful sunrise