Author Topic: Deer fever  (Read 2284 times)

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Offline Allyn T

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Deer fever
« on: November 17, 2021, 11:28:03 am »
Is there any cure for deer fever besides shooting more deer? I made a bad shot on a buck a couple weeks ago. I was shaking so bad afterward  that I could hardly nock a new arrow. I HATE wounding animals and I want to cure my problem sooner rather than later.
In the woods I find my peace

Offline Pat B

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Re: Deer fever
« Reply #1 on: November 17, 2021, 11:56:11 am »
It's pretty much psychological so you have to work on that. The sooner I see the deer the better I can prepare for it and the less I shake until after the shot. Then it really hits me and I have to sit down and hold on for 5 minutes or so until I calm down. When I first see the deer I consciously try to calm down and pick a spot, take deep breaths and make my body rigid, then relax, rigid and relax and so on, like isometrics.. This helps me control the shakes until after the shot.
Make the most of all that comes and the least of all that goes!    Pat Brennan  Brevard, NC

Offline Allyn T

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Re: Deer fever
« Reply #2 on: November 17, 2021, 12:51:23 pm »
That's what I figured. I like it better when they are just suddenly there, if I have a long time to see them coming my mind over heats and I forget everything
In the woods I find my peace

Offline Don W

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Re: Deer fever
« Reply #3 on: November 17, 2021, 01:34:24 pm »
You do want to control it. You don't want to cure it. Never look at the antlers. Focus on that spot. It does get easier with experience, but think about it this way. Talk yourself down. It's the same with any stressful situation in life. Think of the worst thing that could happen and commit to dealing with it. In this case the worse that can happen is you miss your mark. You can deal with that. The best that can happen is you win the game. Your not there to win, you're there to enjoy the experience. After a bit of practice, your subconscious knows what your going to say, and you'll forget your even talking to yourself.
Don

Offline TimBo

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Re: Deer fever
« Reply #4 on: November 17, 2021, 06:50:16 pm »
So far I have only shot deer with a rifle (at least they have been short range).  It helps me to just tell myself I am waiting for the right moment.  It's possible a shot won't even present itself, so why get worked up?  When the moment arrives, be ready, take it...then you can freak out!  And if you are too worked up to shoot, there is nothing wrong with passing on the shot and getting better control of yourself for the next one. 

Offline Allyn T

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Re: Deer fever
« Reply #5 on: November 17, 2021, 09:01:55 pm »
I have passed on shots I wasn't worked up about but I doubted myself. I wish I had more experience but only one way to get that. Don antlers don't get me just deer in general, if a good size doe comes in I get the same pump as a buck.
In the woods I find my peace

Offline archeryrob

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Re: Deer fever
« Reply #6 on: November 19, 2021, 02:26:39 pm »
When you are just meat hunting every deer works you up. I had the same issues before years back. Settling in and letting all the does and young bucks pass in early season and mid season you get used to it. I get excited for the mid size and large bucks, but not crazy like that anymore. I do remember shooting does and get uncontrollable shivers after shooting them from the adrenaline. I have become the quiet observer in the tree anymore. It might also be getting older too and you just look at things differently. Now I enjoy watching a bunch walk as much as shooting them.

But gun season starts after thanksgiving and I am taking the 30-30 and 45 colt for when they get too close. Its time to make jerky and fill some pint size jars.
"If you can't have fun doing it, it ain't worth doing, or you're just doing it wrong."

Offline WhistlingBadger

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Re: Deer fever
« Reply #7 on: November 19, 2021, 02:44:14 pm »
To me, overcoming buck fever has been a lot like overcoming stage fright.  The only way is to get out there and do it.  You can mentally practice picking a spot during non-hunting encounters with deer and other animals.  Practice sneaking up on deer during the off season.  That stuff can help.  But I still get the rush when I get an arrow on the string and a critter close by.  I just acknowledge the feeling, set it aside, and remind myself to take care of business.

(I've killed exactly one deer with a stick bow, so I'm hardly an expert)
~Thomas
"The trail is the thing, not the end of the trail.
Travel too fast, and you miss all you are traveling for."
~Louis L'Amour

Offline Kenneth

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Re: Deer fever
« Reply #8 on: November 19, 2021, 10:09:13 pm »
I have some fears about this too. I shook just shooting groundhogs. I find my breathing much faster when a deer steps out.

Offline Allyn T

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Re: Deer fever
« Reply #9 on: November 20, 2021, 02:32:05 pm »
If I know Im not shooting a deer regardless of how close it gets I'm calm as can be but if I know I'll thump it if it lets me I get all kinds of worked up. One time I saw a deer I thought was a doe and I was breathing hard getting excited, but once it got a little closer I realized it was a spike and I didn't wanna shoot it, all the jitters just flowed away.
In the woods I find my peace

Offline Pappy

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Re: Deer fever
« Reply #10 on: November 21, 2021, 05:25:41 pm »
I still get excited after a bunch of deer under my belt and 40 + years doing it, when that excitement leaves me I will quit, but you do have to control it, I tell myself that the reason for my excitement is i think I am fixing to take home a deer, but if I don't get it under control I ant, so really nothing to be excited about until after the shot. That usually works pretty well for me. I have a good friend that has never been able to get in under control, of course he hasn't killed many deer and the reason is he can't get it under control, not sure how long you been doing this but will say for most it gets easier the more you do it. Good luck with the adventure. ;) :)
 Pappy
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Offline Allyn T

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Re: Deer fever
« Reply #11 on: November 21, 2021, 06:49:03 pm »
I hope I stay excited my whole life and the control comes to me : )
In the woods I find my peace

Offline Pappy

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Re: Deer fever
« Reply #12 on: November 21, 2021, 09:47:32 pm »
It will 😉 Pappy
Clarksville,Tennessee
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Offline Hawkdancer

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Re: Deer fever
« Reply #13 on: November 22, 2021, 12:39:05 am »
All of the above!  Keep trying and control your thinking, look for "the spot" and shoot?
Hawkdancer
Life is far too serious to be taken that way!
Jerry

Offline StickMark

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Re: Deer fever
« Reply #14 on: November 23, 2021, 10:09:06 pm »
Good advice above.
Years ago, a friend had a boss whose string hand shook so bad behind a little bush (Arizona small, Charlie Brown Xmas tree size) as a buck came in that he, the boss, couldn't make it happen. Guy did rodeo, like bucking horses and stuff, so no stranger to adrenaline. Tough man.

My system is this: when a buck comes in, I look at my string hand. Calms me.
In other words, I have a calming sequence, like we all have a shot sequence.
I

Around now, my practice is often a stumper-judo and my binos. I look for deer, does, and get kinda close (150, 60 or so yds), stumping a bit as I stalk into the hidden places from their eyes... Just watching, learning the body again. Not being able to arrow does in AZ means we get to be close to a lot of does. Doe is a dog sized animal here, often. In a way, no big deal.

And a buck is just a deer like a doe, but with silliness coming out its head. A meat tube, with antlers. This calms me too, even though I know there is more to it.
Never look at antlers, yes, have had a bow hand shake and squeak the leather on a handle and alert the buck.



My two cents...