Author Topic: Clean release  (Read 1167 times)

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Offline Allyn T

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Clean release
« on: January 10, 2022, 10:10:03 am »
I've seen a "clean release" mentioned many times before on here and in books. What exactly does that entail and how does one go about achieving that? I'm shooting split finger if that makes a difference.
In the woods I find my peace

Offline Pat B

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Re: Clean release
« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2022, 10:34:03 am »
Believe it or not, a deep hook, putting the string at the second joint of the fingers will give you a cleaner release than putting the string at the first joint. Also, just relaxing your hand and not purposely "releasing" makes for a clean release.
Make the most of all that comes and the least of all that goes!    Pat Brennan  Brevard, NC

Offline Allyn T

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Re: Clean release
« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2022, 12:48:43 pm »
I'll have to try that Pat. I read about the second joint thing but it seemed crazy to me. If you don't hold at anchor does it still work?
In the woods I find my peace

Offline WhistlingBadger

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Re: Clean release
« Reply #3 on: January 10, 2022, 01:40:32 pm »
Yep, the deep grip still works if you don't hold at anchor.  I think it works better than a shallow anchor, especially on heavy bows, because when it's solid and more secure, your hand isn't as tensed up and can relax more easily.  Just make sure you actually get to anchor, or it won't matter much how good your release is.  I often remind myself that I'm releasing the arrow, not shooting it.  It's a slightly different way to thinking.   The arrow at full draw is like a lab at heel with a duck in the water:  It desperately wants to go, and you don't have to push it.  Just let it go.
~Thomas
"The trail is the thing, not the end of the trail.
Travel too fast, and you miss all you are traveling for."
~Louis L'Amour

Offline Pat B

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Re: Clean release
« Reply #4 on: January 10, 2022, 02:31:34 pm »
I very rarely hold my draw but release as soon as I hit anchor. If I find I'm snap shooting without hitting my anchor I will hold for a second or two but as soon as I get back in control I release when I hit anchor. No matter what a deep hook gives better control.
Make the most of all that comes and the least of all that goes!    Pat Brennan  Brevard, NC

Offline Allyn T

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Re: Clean release
« Reply #5 on: January 10, 2022, 10:30:48 pm »
Alrighty, thank you gentlemen I'll try that. I don't have an established form so trying new things shouldn't be that hard.
In the woods I find my peace

Offline Pat B

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Re: Clean release
« Reply #6 on: January 10, 2022, 11:35:00 pm »
Good shooting comes with consistency so find a style that suits you and stick with it.   :OK   (SH)
Make the most of all that comes and the least of all that goes!    Pat Brennan  Brevard, NC

Offline Gimlis Ghost

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Re: Clean release
« Reply #7 on: January 16, 2022, 08:49:02 am »
Believe it or not, a deep hook, putting the string at the second joint of the fingers will give you a cleaner release than putting the string at the first joint. Also, just relaxing your hand and not purposely "releasing" makes for a clean release.

I'll give that a try for sure.
Sounds like it might cure my problem with unexpected kick outs on release.

Offline Eric Krewson

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Re: Clean release
« Reply #8 on: January 16, 2022, 09:38:24 am »
Back tension, the most important part of a clean release.

Offline BJung

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Re: Clean release
« Reply #9 on: January 16, 2022, 04:25:30 pm »
I am no expert, am experimenting to find better techniques, and think a lot of archers have different approaches to shoot their bow. This is how I release my bowstring. First, I tend to practice with a 35# bow. But, when I switch to a my 45 or 50# bow, I tend to hook the string and anchor my draw hand to my face. I use what I call a two-set release. When I get the sight picture I want, I loosen my grip and the string moves to the pads of my finger. They can slip off but I don't let the string go yet. When I am ready to release, I tell myself to pull my back muscle back, this is the signal where my hand relaxes and the string then pulls free. I have a video of my daughter using this technique and don't see her fingers open but the string throwing her hands free of the string. I've practiced shooting my 35# bow in my garage for form and the arrows shot this way goes deeper. I also believe that you can avoid anticipation and letting your hold creep forward and effecting your aim. I'm not saying in my mind, "shoot" or "let go". My mind and thought is on the target and my back muscle but habit is telling my fingers, "fall asleep". This is not to say that a clean finger release method will not work, it can. This is just the way I try to shoot.

Offline bradsmith2010

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Re: Clean release
« Reply #10 on: February 27, 2022, 02:38:28 pm »
when I was a kid,, I just pulled the bow back and let it go,, worked great,, (-S
I have now overthoght everything about archery,, and need my child self to coach me,,

Offline txdm

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Re: Clean release
« Reply #11 on: February 27, 2022, 04:19:52 pm »
I'll have to try that Pat. I read about the second joint thing but it seemed crazy to me. If you don't hold at anchor does it still work?

This kind of thing varies with the bow weight, the style of handle, how you grip and anchor, and the mass of the bow of course. You might find that drawing on the first joint, or even with 2 fingers, releases cleaner with a 30# bow, while 3 fingers on the second joint releases cleaner on a 50# bow. The heavier weight is naturally an aid in "clean" release from the fingers on the string because it does a lot of the work in spite of our fingers, but you could need to use the second joint to hold your anchor and aim properly.

The most important thing you can do, in my 20-yard opinion, is to tune your arrows, brace height, & nock height, then find what release works for you consistently with that setup. And practice every day.
« Last Edit: February 27, 2022, 04:27:20 pm by txdm »