Author Topic: Sharpening/grinding the final bevel.  (Read 5008 times)

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Offline Fox

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Sharpening/grinding the final bevel.
« on: February 04, 2022, 08:40:39 pm »
How do you go from a knife that has one bevel ground and how thin do you make that bevel? Like the thickness of a dime? And then how do you grind the final bevel or the actual place you sharpen from there ? I am having a very hard time with this
Why must we make simple things so complicated?

Offline Mesophilic

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Re: Sharpening/grinding the final bevel.
« Reply #1 on: February 09, 2022, 07:59:47 am »
Belt grinder, taking my time, with lots of frequent dips in cold water so I don't damage the heat treat.   Takes practice and a steady hand to cut the edge bevels on my Grizzly grinder but sure saves alot of wear and tear when I take it to the stones.
 
Trying is the first step to failure
-Homer Simpson-

Offline Don W

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    • diy.timetestedtools.net/
Re: Sharpening/grinding the final bevel.
« Reply #2 on: February 09, 2022, 11:05:04 am »
Belt grinder, slow the belt down to about half speed or less. Use newer belts.ceramc belts tend to run cooler as well. I agree it takes lots of practice. I think it's on the the harder task to master.
Don

Offline Fox

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Re: Sharpening/grinding the final bevel.
« Reply #3 on: February 09, 2022, 11:16:04 am »
Well that’s good to know there’s no trick to get perfect bevels (lol)
Just practice, well I can do that. Thanks
Why must we make simple things so complicated?

Offline Mesophilic

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Re: Sharpening/grinding the final bevel.
« Reply #4 on: February 09, 2022, 02:25:51 pm »
For the primary bevels I took 1" square stock and gound the ends to known angles.   Think of it as a 3 inch long  block of steel, with say 7° angle on one end and 6° on the other.  Did this down to 3°

So when I'm hogging metal off of a blank I start with the 7° dependingon blade width.  I score the center of where the edge will be.  Lay the angle block flat on the work surface and use it to push the blade in to the belt.  Once the flat is ground to about half s dime thickness away from that center line I switch to the 6° and so forth till I'm at about a high saber grind.  Go free hand from there.  Lets me keep things more even.

Anyway, you could probably do this same angled guide block principle for the edge grind itself.  I've just gotten a feel for cutting the edge bevel over the years so never looked in to it.  And steel on steel or even iron on steel can and will scratch up your blade flats as you drag the knife across it.

Trying is the first step to failure
-Homer Simpson-