Author Topic: problems reaching full draw  (Read 1952 times)

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Offline lonbow

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problems reaching full draw
« on: February 28, 2022, 04:15:40 am »
Hello everyone :)

I have a question about my problem concerning draw length, that I would like to get rid of. My draw length is 27", but its very difficult for me to  draw any bow further than 25 or 26 inches when Im shooting at a target. I know that its a mental problem, as Im very easily able to draw my 36 lbs black locust bow that Im currently using facing a wall (Im physically able to shoot bows of more than 100 lbs). But as soon as Im shooting at a target Im not able to reach my full draw length anymore (with any draw weight), as Im geting very nervous. Im reaching my anchor point each time, but my bows arm wont extend for full draw. Im trying to get rid of that problem since quite a long time, but it doesnt seem to work. My drawlength is shortest when I start my shooting session and Im able to draw the bow a bit further after 30 to 50 shots or so. Shooting a few days later, my draw is short again, so I have to extend it. But Im almost never able to reach my full draw.

Do you have any idea what might be the problem and how I can solve it? This would be a great help! Thank you!

best wishes,
lonbow
« Last Edit: February 28, 2022, 04:36:59 am by lonbow »

Offline lonbow

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Re: problems reaching full draw
« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2022, 04:39:38 am »
I also have to add that its very difficult for me to stay in the full draw position for longer than 0.5 or 1 seconds. Facing a wall, staying in the full draw position for 2 or 3 seconds is no problem.

Offline Gimlis Ghost

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Re: problems reaching full draw
« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2022, 07:06:20 am »
How is your line up of arm and shoulder?
I had a similat problem in unconsiously not reaching full draw. I realized I was letting my bow arm not go far enough back to line up with my shoulders. Arrows were loping to the target, obviously much slower than they should be moving. Once I consiously corrected for that my velocity and accuracy improved.

You might be trying to obtain the best sight picture at expense of best form. You might try aiming with your bow arm side eye. That would put your arm further back while relieving stress on your neck.

Offline Eric Krewson

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Re: problems reaching full draw
« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2022, 08:38:43 am »
Target panic, it is a monster that I have faced for the last 20 years, not so much at home but get it bad during tournaments.

I dropped my poundage and do much better but I feel your pain.

Offline TimBo

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Re: problems reaching full draw
« Reply #4 on: February 28, 2022, 10:04:25 am »
Yep, target panic.  Yours is one classic version; the other is that you can reach full draw, but can't get on target before releasing.  Try Jay Kidwell's book Instinctive Archery Insights.  I have gotten pretty good control of my TP at this point, although I think it is sort of like being an alcoholic (luckily no experience there) in that you have to watch out for a return.  There have been tons of digital ink spilled on this subject here, on the Leatherwall, and on TradGang, but I would try the Kidwell book first before getting swamped with other suggestions.  Blind bale practice (shooting very close and only thinking about form with your eyes closed) is beneficial and maybe something to do while you wait for the book to arrive.  The overall problem is that your brain is cutting corners; you need to re-train it to not assume every shot will result in an immediate release.  Good luck - you can beat TP, and I would recommend doing it before archery becomes not fun.  I quit shooting for about 12 years because mine got so bad. 

Offline Kenneth

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Re: problems reaching full draw
« Reply #5 on: February 28, 2022, 01:11:03 pm »
This problem you described is exactly what I have struggled with. I found some answers in advice from Joel Turner who runs a company called ShotIQ. The thing that changed my shooting was the idea of focusing on the movement that makes the shot go off, which is increasing tension on the string, rather than allowing the aim to be the stimulus for the release. This does not negate instinctive shooting as this is training your form, and any aiming method can be accommodated, although I have personally switched to using gap aiming as its easier and more solid for me. Also, I have begun to make use of a psychological trigger for the release, which is tape or thread at the full draw spot on my arrow. This works like this: when I hit full draw I complete my aim, then focus on increasing back tension until I feel the tape or twine touch my knuckle, which triggers the release.

When I shot before, I never had any control over the arrow release, my subconscious was doing it for me and May I say doing a very bad job ( although according to Turner this is the very function of the subconscious, to not allow the body to cause itself shock as a surprise). I never had any control other than my form and my aim, the release was a huge struggle. I believe this is why many shooters use a clicker on their bow. I dont care to put something I didnt make myself on my bow so the twine or tape on the arrow shaft is working for my purpose. Having total control over the shot feels really good too. Its nice to be able to shoot in front of people without getting nervous inside and wondering what my shots going to do this time??

Offline WhistlingBadger

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Re: problems reaching full draw
« Reply #6 on: February 28, 2022, 06:06:02 pm »
I second the Jay Kidwell book.  His insights helped me get on top of the mental game, which totally changed my shooting consistency (from terrible to mildly sporadic!) and allowed me to finally perforate a deer.

Do lots and lots of "blind bale" shooting.  Get up really close to the target, so close that aiming is not an issue.  Shoot, and shoot, and shoot, and shoot, concentrating only on form:  Feet, bowhand, string hand, anchor, release.  It took me several months of practicing this way to reset my habits and disperse the anxiety.  I even came to really enjoy it:  A good release feels GOOD, no matter the distance.

Once your form feels comfortable, consistent, and enjoyable again (and remember, this might take a long time, and that's OK!), then and only then start trying to hit the bulls-eye.  If you're anything like me, you'll be amazed.
~Thomas
"The trail is the thing, not the end of the trail.
Travel too fast, and you miss all you are traveling for."
~Louis L'Amour

Offline StickMark

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Re: problems reaching full draw
« Reply #7 on: March 06, 2022, 03:12:40 pm »
"The overall problem is that your brain is cutting corners; you need to re-train it to not assume every shot will result in an immediate release. " Timbo

^This....^

To avoid TP, I will draw, aim and hold, then let down about 10% or abouts every practice. I am amazed how I still occasionally fight myself, and release an arrow even though I said "no,". I learned a lot from Clum's videos. Locking into the back tension, that is my onboard clicker. Sitting, the draw length shortens, from @ 25.5 to @24 or so, but the tension feels same. 

Instinctive Archery is a good book. Just be sure to be comfortable with the grains per pound arrow you shoot before you start his training, as Kidwell's focus is on memorizing trajectory.

Another item that may relate to target panic might be stack. In Primitive Archer, Ryan Gills' draw length and archery style article mentions the stack being more in wood bows compared to fiberglass. That may be something to consider. A few years ago, after three misses in the summer season, I started my own personal "Accuracy Factory" training. I have a "failed" bow that is 28# or so, and long, so it is perfect for form work, as I am not feeling poundage nor considerable stack.

Offline BowEd

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Re: problems reaching full draw
« Reply #8 on: March 07, 2022, 09:09:49 am »
In the past I've used the blind bale shoot method for form memory to help me with this.
I have to stay on top of that all the time yet.
Having never owned a compound and just an old old FG bow which I never shot much at all it took some time.I just used that FG bow as a reference for floor tillering when starting to make wooden bows.
Some can get it right away and some it takes longer.
It's amazing the good that happens when the anchor and follow through go smoothly.Focus is a big thing with no distractions for me.
Sometime I'm going to sign on a top limbs' fade the word "focus".

« Last Edit: March 07, 2022, 09:51:51 am by BowEd »
BowEd
You got to stand for something or you'll fall for anything.
Ed

Offline bradsmith2010

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Re: problems reaching full draw
« Reply #9 on: April 05, 2022, 07:04:06 pm »
I think its different for everyone,,
these are some things I have done that were positive,,
I put a peace of tape at the intended draw,, draw to the tape then shoot
practice alot at close range,, 5 yards,,
stop shooting competition if that is effecting your shooting in a negative way,,
just practice practice practice shooting the form you want to develope,,
I shot for many years with 25 inch draw no anchor,, not tournaments but hunting, that is how I felt comfortable,,
the last couple of years I have competed with my friends so I went to a more conventional longer draw for that,,
but it took me several months to be able to do it,,
I think if anything the close range shooting helped the most, I found if form was good,, extending the range was easy,,

Offline WhistlingBadger

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Re: problems reaching full draw
« Reply #10 on: April 06, 2022, 10:42:07 am »
I think if anything the close range shooting helped the most, I found if form was good,, extending the range was easy,,

Very true.  Our brains are really only meant to consciously focus on one thing at a time.  I have to get my form so engrained that it happens automatically; once that's there, I can start thinking about picking a spot and putting the arrow where I want it.  I can't consciously think about both at the same time.
~Thomas
"The trail is the thing, not the end of the trail.
Travel too fast, and you miss all you are traveling for."
~Louis L'Amour

Offline bradsmith2010

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Re: problems reaching full draw
« Reply #11 on: May 14, 2022, 03:08:12 pm »
lonbow,, hows the shooting going,,??