Author Topic: The most Controversal technique  (Read 1310 times)

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Offline bowman123

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The most Controversal technique
« on: March 22, 2022, 10:41:25 am »
The moment Lars Anderson is mentioned, an explosion of emotions is the typical response in the archery community.
I get it, he made many historical claims without backing them up,
and most of his stunts running around and doing flips is for stunt.
The thing is, his fundamental technique of shooting a burst of arrows is real and the fastest known technique today.

Here is a video tutorial https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pFkjVA7BIcM on how to speed shoot like lars and you can see the technique itself does not require special arrows, but two fletch and a wider nock does help

What i am wondering is, could stone age hunters used this technique as follow-up shots after their first accurate arrow is shot?

we also made a video following ancient artwork following their techniques

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pV7nDusS9Tw

stone age archery represents at least 90% of archery history and it is unrecorded history. Only have a few cave paintings where we see archers holding arrows in their bow hand, but not string hand

i can see this being useful for self defence against predators, and followup shots for shooting at a group of animals, where accuracy is not important




« Last Edit: April 06, 2022, 04:24:46 pm by bowman123 »

Offline bowman123

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Re: The most Controversal technique
« Reply #1 on: March 22, 2022, 10:54:48 am »
attached is the two variations explaining pros and cons

Offline WhistlingBadger

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Re: The most Controversal technique
« Reply #2 on: March 22, 2022, 01:52:59 pm »
Makes sense to me.  From what I've read, the one-shot, surgical kill is somewhat of a modern ideal.  Stone age men did what they needed to do.  The tribes around here commonly used dogbane sap and other poisons, which are extremely effective but don't give what I would consider to be a quick, clean kill.  Cave paintings commonly show animals with multiple arrows sticking out of every part of their bodies.  When you're starving and presented with a less-than-ideal shot, you're going to take the chance. 

In that strictly utilitarian, get-the-job-done kind of hunting, I could see speed shooting being useful.  Certainly in warfare or self-protection it would be handy.  I know many of the plains tribes had games involving who could put the most arrows into the air before the first one struck dirt.
~Thomas
"The trail is the thing, not the end of the trail.
Travel too fast, and you miss all you are traveling for."
~Louis L'Amour

Offline txdm

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Re: The most Controversal technique
« Reply #3 on: March 23, 2022, 03:41:51 pm »
While the ideal sounds cool, keep in mind that an animal can easily get out of range or sight within a second after being shot with an arrow.

I think the best approach (and the reason for the cave art with multiple arrows in the animal) was  to get the whole gang together to shoot the animal as a group vs. one super speed shooter.

Now in matters of warfare, "shower shooting" would make more sense to me.

Offline bowman123

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Re: The most Controversal technique
« Reply #4 on: March 28, 2022, 05:24:57 pm »
i think when it comes to hunting carnivores and omnivores the idea of shooting multiple arrows is crucial

Offline WhistlingBadger

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Re: The most Controversal technique
« Reply #5 on: April 04, 2022, 01:31:59 pm »
I know it's off topic, but I have to say it:  Wow, those Egyptian bows are whip-tillered something awful!  Reminds me of some of the historical pictures I've seen of southwestern NA bows.  I seem to remember reading somewhere that the whip-tillered design works best with weaker bow woods.  It's just interesting to me.

Anyway...back to the topic.  Like many techniques, it depends on the situation.  Shooting at herd animals in open country (with a whole tribe back home to feed)?  Hunting out of a chariot?  Hunting dangerous game that might charge?  Warfare against a massed opponent?  There are times when a machine gun makes more sense than a sniper rifle.
~Thomas
"The trail is the thing, not the end of the trail.
Travel too fast, and you miss all you are traveling for."
~Louis L'Amour