Author Topic: Wanting to get in BP rifles  (Read 9721 times)

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Offline Fox

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Wanting to get in BP rifles
« on: October 30, 2023, 03:58:49 pm »
Hey ya'll im interested in buying a muzzleloader, I want to build one at some point but don't have the time now and would like to try to hunt with a muzzleloader some this season. Ive been looking at the traditions Springfield Hawken cause its quite inexpensive and looks pretty nice. Im guessing I should go with percussion to simplify things for now. The issue is there all out of stock! anyone have any other rifles they might recommend? Thanks!
Why must we make simple things so complicated?

Offline Buckskinner

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Re: Wanting to get in BP rifles
« Reply #1 on: November 02, 2023, 01:56:52 pm »
While there are a few on here that can help you out, there is much better information on BP guns at www.muzzleloadingforum.com.

They also have a classified section where I bet you could find something that would suit you.  I'm a novice, but I've built 3 flintlocks and they were great fun and huge learning experience that I was glad to accomplish.

I can give you 2 tips... Beware of the huge rabbit hole you are about to fall into and you get what you pay for.

Offline Fox

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Re: Wanting to get in BP rifles
« Reply #2 on: November 02, 2023, 03:29:37 pm »
Thanks buckskinner!
Why must we make simple things so complicated?

Offline Piddler

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Re: Wanting to get in BP rifles
« Reply #3 on: November 02, 2023, 07:54:05 pm »
Give Pedersoli a look over. No complaints with mine.
Piddler
"My goal in life is to try and be the kind of person my dog thinks I am"

Offline Eric Krewson

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Re: Wanting to get in BP rifles
« Reply #4 on: November 03, 2023, 10:32:50 am »
Decisions, decisions; first decide what you are planning, mostly hunting and what, target shooting and hunting, percussion or flint. I recommend a percussion gun starting out. I think your choice for a Traditions Hawken is a good one but only in percussion, the lower priced locks in flint are just OK, nothing special. Traditions barrels are good, as well as accurate. Then there is the choice of shooting bullets or patched round balls, the rifling rate of twist will be different for rifles made for one or the other.

TCs made their rifles with a one rifling twist in 48" which is middle of the road, these barrels would shoot a ball or conical bullets. I owned a bunch of them and found they didn't shoot either equally well, they tended to prefer one or the other with a patched ball usually being the best. . Patched Ball specific barrels in the deer hunting calibers of .50 and .54 tend to be 1 in 66", barrels made to shoot only bullets are usually around 1 in 28". Nothing is written in stone, some round ball barrels will shoot a conical, most won't, some fast twist barrels will shoot a round ball but most won't 

How deep are your pockets, the cost of M/L parts has doubled in the last few years, M/L prices have followed suit. I can have a thousand parts before I even start building a new rifle.

Used rifles are sometimes a good deal but unless you have a bore scope or a very good bore light to look in the barrel, I wouldn't buy any of them. Back in the day we all bought TCs or CVAs when states started having M/L seasons, many people treated their M/L like a modern rifle and didn't clean them after they shot them. Consequently, there are more of them out there with rust and pitting in the bore than ones with pristine barrels.

Another thing to remember is every rifle has a personality, it will shoot poor groups with one load and drive tacks with another, you have to experiment around and see what it likes.

Here is an example; I built a flintlock rifle with a .50 cal barrel and wanted a .54 so I sent the barrel off for a re-bore to .54. The guy who rebored the barrel did a lousy job, the best I could get out of it was a 5" group at 50 yards with a variety of loads.

I coned the barrel to make it easier to load, this amounts to using a special tool to make a funnel like opening at the muzzle so you can push a patched ball in the bore with your thumb. I shot the rifle after coning it and the accuracy hadn't changed.

I was shooting a little low with 80 gr of powder, I had run out of sight adjustment so I upped the powder load to 85gr, I hadn't shot this much powder in the rifle to this point.

Bingo! I was shooting low so I held high for the first shot and hit high so I went back to my 6 o'clock hold for the next two shots. This is at 50 yards, I would challenge most modern rifles to shoot this well with iron sights at 50 yards.





« Last Edit: November 03, 2023, 10:14:27 pm by Eric Krewson »

Offline Eric Krewson

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Re: Wanting to get in BP rifles
« Reply #5 on: November 03, 2023, 10:54:34 am »
Now, if you have deep pockets and find you really like this B/P stuff, a Kibler flintlock kit is the way to go. His southern rifle and the colonial rifle kits take some marginal skills to complete, to a novice the task can be daunting.

His Woods Runner kit is different, all the parts are CNC shaped and fit into a CNC shaped stock with just a little wood adjustment. One can have this rifle assembled in just a few hours with only the stock and metal finish of your choice to have a completed, historically correct rifle of your own.

The kits run around $1200 and up depending on how fancy the stock wood is.

Kibler doesn't have a gallery of photos of the completed Woods Runners up yet but here is the Colonial galery of customer completed rifles to give you an idea of how good these rifles are.

https://katherinewerre.smugmug.com/Colonial-Rifle-Kit-Customer-Photos/

I built one of the Kibler Southern Mountain Rifles that our one and only Pappy owns now, a wonderful rifle in.32 for squirrel hunting.

Here it is;


 
« Last Edit: November 03, 2023, 11:04:56 am by Eric Krewson »

Offline Fox

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Re: Wanting to get in BP rifles
« Reply #6 on: November 04, 2023, 03:30:31 pm »
Thank you Eric! That is a lot of super helpful info! That rifle is quite pretty, makes me really want to get into it just what I need anotherrrr hobby you could spend your whole life learning about hahah
Why must we make simple things so complicated?

Offline Eric Krewson

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Re: Wanting to get in BP rifles
« Reply #7 on: November 09, 2023, 09:35:20 am »
Flintlock rifles and selfbows go hand in hand, I get the same thrill killing a deer with my flintlock as I do taking one with a selfbow. Many of the guys at the Buckskinner rendezvous have selfbows with them as well. The competition at these events usually includes axe throwing and selfbow shooting.

Hunting with a flintlock adds a different degree of difficulty than a selfbow but is still a challenge. They don't call them "flinchlocks" for nothing.

I love my flintlock rifes and shotguns. The rifle in the picture is the first one I built, .54 and a deer smasher.

« Last Edit: November 09, 2023, 09:38:48 am by Eric Krewson »

Offline Pappy

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Re: Wanting to get in BP rifles
« Reply #8 on: November 26, 2023, 09:05:07 pm »
Yep Eric , a beautiful rifle I have and just love the feel of carrying it in the woods, a lot to learn but I am getting there, shooting it is a real joy. 😉 Pappy
Clarksville,Tennessee
TwinOaks Bowhunters
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Offline Eric Krewson

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Re: Wanting to get in BP rifles
« Reply #9 on: November 27, 2023, 10:29:52 am »
Thanks Pappy, I don't dress the part, just not my thing but I get a distinct feeling that I have stepped back in time when I am walking through the woods with one of my flintlocks.

I don't get that step back in time feeling when I am hunting with a selfbow, probably because we are making them on a level now that they are on par with almost any other traditional bow.

Offline Lost Oki

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Re: Wanting to get in BP rifles
« Reply #10 on: February 13, 2024, 01:22:58 am »
A lot of very good info already provided.  Would suggest that you check out the National Muzzle Loader Rifle association web site https://www.nmlra.org/  Look under the tab for clubs, scroll down to Virginia. locate a club in your area and give them a call or email.  Let them know of your interest and go from there.  I will bet you get a lot of help/support.