Author Topic: Splicing with handtools  (Read 1948 times)

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Offline Ryan Jacob

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Splicing with handtools
« on: May 17, 2019, 08:13:33 am »
After looking for a good while, Iíve finally found some good glue. I have some billets left over and Iím curious, is it possible to make a decent splice with only hand tools? I donít have the space or authority to own a bandsaw yet. Iím guessing a v-splice would be rather weak so should I go with a z or w-splice?
Making is just almost-breaking.

Offline Badger

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Re: Splicing with handtools
« Reply #1 on: May 17, 2019, 08:28:39 am »
  Those Japanese saws are inexpensive and for me are easier to control. Some of the hardwoods will take some time but the slow movement helps you to stay on the lines.

Offline DC

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Re: Splicing with handtools
« Reply #2 on: May 17, 2019, 08:33:49 am »
Strength depends on the length of the glue line. The more fingers you have the shorter the overall splice can be. This link will help you understand finger joints

https://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/documnts/fplrp/fplrp382.pdf

I see no reason not to do one by hand. I made a jig to help me but I still end up doing a bunch of fiddling to get them right. If you are one of those fortunate people that can saw a straight line it should be easy. Make up a sanding stick that will fit down in between the fingers.
Vancouver Island
If you don't have any questions you must not be paying attention.

Offline DC

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Re: Splicing with handtools
« Reply #3 on: May 17, 2019, 08:40:33 am »
And steaming/boiling and clamping covers a multitude of errors ;) ;) ;)
Vancouver Island
If you don't have any questions you must not be paying attention.

Offline Woodely

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Re: Splicing with handtools
« Reply #4 on: May 17, 2019, 09:11:51 am »
I have done some remarkable work with the Japanese saw making dado and rabbit cuts.
"Doing bad work is an exercise in futility, but honestly making mistakes is trying your best."

Offline ohma2

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Re: Splicing with handtools
« Reply #5 on: May 17, 2019, 10:20:47 am »
Ditto on the jap, saw

Offline Limbit

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Re: Splicing with handtools
« Reply #6 on: May 17, 2019, 11:53:31 am »
Like others said, Japanese hand saw and v splice greater than 4''. There are a few rules you need to follow when using a Japanese hand saw and cutting joint, but you'll figure it out quick. Just practice on a cheap 2x4 of lumber a few times first. I prefer hand saws now. Cleaner cuts.

Offline bassman

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Re: Splicing with handtools
« Reply #7 on: May 17, 2019, 12:13:52 pm »
I make Bamboo floor board bows with  5 inch v splices, and smooth on.Never had a failure.

Offline PatM

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Re: Splicing with handtools
« Reply #8 on: May 17, 2019, 02:31:45 pm »
Willing to bet all the old composite bows were spliced with hand tools.   In many ways hand tools are better for this process., especially for beginners.

 I've never done a splice any other way.

 Also as noted v- splices of decent length are plenty strong.

Offline DC

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Re: Splicing with handtools
« Reply #9 on: May 17, 2019, 02:53:48 pm »
I think I will try my next one with hand tools. My jig "works" but has limitations. I'll just watch a few Japanese joinery videos for inspiration.
Vancouver Island
If you don't have any questions you must not be paying attention.

Offline Hamish

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Re: Splicing with handtools
« Reply #10 on: May 17, 2019, 03:11:57 pm »
Here's an old post of mine that might help. Good splices can be cut by hand if you are patient enough.



 Hamish
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Re: cutting splices with hand tools
ę Reply #16 on: March 29, 2015, 05:51:44 pm Ľ

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Cutting splices by hand:
It all comes down to accurate marking out, and good quality tools.

The sides and belly should be planed flat and squar,. Not easy if you don't have the tools or experience.
Mark the splice on the back . The flat and square surfaces allow you use a combination square to project accurate lines around the sides, to the belly. Mark up the lines belly and you will have identical sets of lines on both back and belly.
Mark out waste area on both sides of both billets and double check that the correct areas will be cut.
 
Cut from both sides rather than sawing from one side and hoping the cut will stay square. A spliced handle is going to be 1.5 to 2" deep, from back to belly which is too much for most people to cut accurately with a handsaw.
When you cut from  each side you first saw to the other side only at the top, then down the handle staying on the same side, the blade doesn't go through to the other side  .  Then flip it around and repeat. This leaves a hidden peak of material in the middle which you then cut. The billet now has kerfed partial depth cuts on both sides so sawing down the peak is easy as the kerfs guide the sawblade from one side to the other of the billet.

You need a good saw, either a very large western tenon saw rip cut teeth with a back on it to stiffen the blade. You will need one the allows at least 4.25" depth of cut. (expensive for a new one)
Better off getting a Japanese pull saw, with rip cut teeth, as they don't need a blade stiffener, so they can cut 4"depth no problem.

If you don't have any experience practice on some scraps, both squaring up and cutting.
Hamish.



Offline Sabb

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Re: Splicing with handtools
« Reply #11 on: May 17, 2019, 03:55:36 pm »
I'll second making your splicing area flat and square, and add in make both halves the same size. Life is much easier that way. Also mark every face of your stock.
 And remember it doesn't have to be pretty to be solid

Sebastian

Offline Badger

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Re: Splicing with handtools
« Reply #12 on: May 17, 2019, 04:17:58 pm »
  A few times I was having problems getting flat and square so I covered the end of the billet with plaster of paris to make both sides flat for accurate marking. It was easy to sand the plaster flat and easy to mark.

Offline Ryan Jacob

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Re: Splicing with handtools
« Reply #13 on: May 17, 2019, 06:09:00 pm »
Thanks to all of you for providing help. Itís time to get on attempt #10.
Making is just almost-breaking.

Offline Hawkdancer

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Re: Splicing with handtools
« Reply #14 on: May 17, 2019, 08:33:06 pm »
Keep practicing with scrap wood - you can always use the pieces to broil a steak! (lol) (lol) (lol) >:D (=).  Never tried a splice, but this info sounds good. I got lots of scrap wood!!
Hawkdancer
Life is far too serious to be taken that way!
Jerry