Author Topic: Anyone ever tried this patch?  (Read 2418 times)

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Offline Prarie Bowyer

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Re: Anyone ever tried this patch?
« Reply #15 on: May 01, 2012, 05:39:16 am »
I'll try to get a pic up tomorrow.  My patch came out almost invisible save where I grooved it and the glue trench shows in a few places.  Oh and the patch is standing slightly proud of the belly as per the instructions.

In the future I'll try and make a grain matching template.  You just take a piece of paper and mark some grain lines from the belly on it.  then move that around on the piece that scrap will be cut from till you find a spot where most of the grain lines line up with the tick marks.

Offline Prarie Bowyer

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Re: Anyone ever tried this patch?
« Reply #16 on: May 01, 2012, 01:04:59 pm »
I haven't strung it yet but here are pics of the pach after carving it down.  Carving Ipe and Urac is a great way to dull a good chissel.  I realized that the quartersawn grain recomendation for for ease of carving.  Fortunately I'm a carver of some tallent so it wasn't a problem.  The ohnly thing I'd add is that it can be scrapped with micro scrapers made from broken hacksaw blades.  Pics of the patch.


Offline Youngboyer2(billyf)

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Re: Anyone ever tried this patch?
« Reply #17 on: May 02, 2012, 12:27:01 am »
Lookin good,
How did you make micro scrapers from hacksaw blades?
-Billy
"You speak Treason!" "Fluently"-Robin of Locksley
When people ask "why didn't you do that the first time" you can be sure that they  have never made a bow before.

Offline Prarie Bowyer

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Re: Anyone ever tried this patch?
« Reply #18 on: May 02, 2012, 01:29:03 am »
Grind the teeth off.  That is the best edge but the back works also.  The radius section on the ends is handy for detailing.  You can use a Dremel and a small grinding wheel to regrind them into different shapes. 

Scraping usualy gets a better finish than sanding faster.  IN some woods like maple and boxwood it's the only efficient proposition.  Maple for example makes it difficult to skip sanding grits because the previous grit scratches will show unless you use power sanding or are prepared to make a career of it.

Take for example the carving in the video below.  There was zero sanding on that.  It is self harvested Rock Maple from NJ.  Yes it took along time, BUT it goes faster if you use a mallot for everything AND scrape not sand.  I did grind some areas with 80 Grit sanding belt pieces glued to a shapped stick.  Then right to the scrapers and sharp chissels for final finishing and polishing.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dyBWrlobktw&feature=plcp