Author Topic: Beginner core form  (Read 3410 times)

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Offline gorazd

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Re: Beginner core form
« Reply #15 on: June 09, 2017, 02:23:21 am »
And here is the form of the mongol bow from 13th century (ntn 130cm)...   


Offline BowEd

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  • BowEd
Re: Beginner core form
« Reply #16 on: June 09, 2017, 05:58:32 am »
Yes.The angles are very important I believe too.In ease of tillering and performance reasons.Steeper angle ie.... harder to tiller/better material used but better for performance.
BowEd
You got to stand for something or you'll fall for anything.
Ed

Offline Bjoern Sofeit

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Re: Beginner core form
« Reply #17 on: June 10, 2017, 07:16:59 am »
And here is the form of the mongol bow from 13th century (ntn 130cm)...

Drop the weird setback grip. Only cheap fiberglass bows have these.

The original bows from Cagaan Chad and Bajan Aguij have slightly less articulated bulbous grips that resemble those of CTs, which is absolutely no surprise. There is little grip reflex though.

Offline Progressor

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Re: Beginner core form
« Reply #18 on: September 17, 2017, 09:52:49 am »
how come it is not one smooth even curve the whole way, if this has been discussed already I would appreciate a link please : )



mikekeswick

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Re: Beginner core form
« Reply #19 on: September 27, 2017, 11:34:07 pm »
how come it is not one smooth even curve the whole way, if this has been discussed already I would appreciate a link please : )

Angular bends are better because the limb weighs less for the same reflex. Plus traditional core/horn joinery can only handle limited reflex in the bending sections.

Offline Aaron H

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Re: Beginner core form
« Reply #20 on: October 05, 2018, 03:56:40 am »
I bent some hackberry laths last night.  I just love how well hackberry bends with steam.   I started to get a little lift on one of the tip bends, but it should clean up just fine.