Author Topic: Scythian tamarisk core  (Read 362 times)

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Offline loefflerchuck

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Scythian tamarisk core
« on: October 11, 2017, 07:20:45 pm »
I cut some knot free tamarisk last time I was in the desert. I wanted to try and see if I could shape it green. I know this form is not quite perfect for a Scythian core but close enough. The limb split with no twist. I boiled it for 30 min and it easily bent to the shape of this form with no problems. I know most of the old bows were small sections of wood spliced throughout the limb, but if i get two solid limbs with no splice I figure I'll have a better chance at a shooter. I plan on splitting it down the middle and adding the center piece of horn. Probably use a side cut of bighorn since that is what I have and can get a 24" piece. Bighorn is a lot like mauflon, and mauflon may have been used.

Offline BowEd

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Re: Scythian tamarisk core
« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2017, 06:18:43 am »
You mean splitting it down the middle edge wise up and down?No sinew then either correct?....or maybe a crown of it down the center?Interesting!!
« Last Edit: October 12, 2017, 06:22:14 am by BowEd »
Beadman
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Ed

Offline loefflerchuck

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Re: Scythian tamarisk core
« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2017, 09:53:42 am »
Exactly Ed, but a real sinew backing. like a normal composite. Then wrapped with sinew the entire length.

Offline BowEd

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Re: Scythian tamarisk core
« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2017, 03:14:44 pm »
Just spitballing here about the forces that happen when at full draw.Would it work to slightly concave the belly and convex the back before sinewing/the other way around/or crowned on both surfaces/or leave it flat before sinewing?Guess that might make a difference how much of a percentage of the width is horn?Glad your making those decisions on that.
I would say if done as stated mass should be reduced by quite a bit with the tamarisk.
Beadman
You got to stand for something or you'll fall for anything.
Ed

Offline loefflerchuck

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Re: Scythian tamarisk core
« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2017, 05:08:07 pm »
I'm not really trying to experiment with any new ideas Ed. I've just always liked how the Scythian bows look and the unique technology of these bows made over 2000 years ago. I was reinspired reading the study by Karpowicz and Selby on these bows. The ones form Xinjang were made of tamarisk. Since it is a invasive species to the south of me I thought it was a good opportunity. I don't have ibex horn but this is not an exact replica anyway. I figure I have enough experience to have about a 40% chance of success.

mikekeswick

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Re: Scythian tamarisk core
« Reply #5 on: October 12, 2017, 11:26:45 pm »
It will be really interesting to see how this bow turns out. Good luck.

Offline BowEd

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Re: Scythian tamarisk core
« Reply #6 on: October 13, 2017, 05:40:41 am »
Still an interesting endeavor Chuck.It's intriqued me a bunch and I think your chances of success are higher then 40% myself and not being an exact replica with a certain type of horn would matter little to me.I'd look at it that it's all relevant and to me not be less of a bow.We use materials available to our surroundings or as far as Fed Ex can reach or our pocket book can handle.....lol.Just joking.To me I see a different use or maybe more efficient less wasteful use of horn too possibly.
PS....Sure are a lot of curves on a bow like that.
Beadman
You got to stand for something or you'll fall for anything.
Ed

Offline loefflerchuck

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Re: Scythian tamarisk core
« Reply #7 on: October 13, 2017, 07:20:00 pm »
Well said Ed. Yes, If you were willing to make all kinds of bows you would use the top curl of the horn for a regular composite and the sides for this bow for less waste.

To update: I figured the sapwood would split as it dried. I saw a couple cracks already by the next morning after shaping. I coated the entire limb with wood glue and put it back on the form to dry. With the other limb as soon as it was cooled I coated it with glue and put it back in the form. I'm going to leave them until they season a bit, so no more updates on this post for a while to come.