Author Topic: Sinew backing a twisted/missaligned stave  (Read 256 times)

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Offline JNystrom

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Sinew backing a twisted/missaligned stave
« on: December 06, 2017, 01:30:16 am »
Hello everyone!

This has bothered me for a while: will you have problems if you sinew back a stave that you heat corrected earlier? Will the moisture from sinew backing and sinew pulling to reflex missalign or twist the stave to its original form? I have some good osage staves for example that i would like to make short sinew backed bows, but they would need straightening before. I have done quite some heat corrections before, but what i don't have is experience with corrections and sinew back!
Any ideas?

Thanks in advance!

Offline Pat B

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Re: Sinew backing a twisted/missaligned stave
« Reply #1 on: December 06, 2017, 04:05:50 am »
As long as the bow is tillered evenly and the sinew is applied evenly you shouldn't have a problem. I've heat treated just about every bow I've sinewed.
Make the most of all that comes and the least of all that goes!    Pat Brennan  Brevard, NC

Offline Stick Bender

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Re: Sinew backing a twisted/missaligned stave
« Reply #2 on: December 06, 2017, 07:38:22 am »
The last osage/sinew I did I heat corected reflex in and shellac the belly prior to sinew to minimise any cracks never got any cracks or deviations but the bow never made it to being a bow do to a weak spot on the mid/outers !
If you fear failure you will never Try !

Offline DesertDisciple

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Re: Sinew backing a twisted/missaligned stave
« Reply #3 on: December 06, 2017, 07:40:10 am »
I corrected and heat treated my sinew backed hickory and it held. Allow more time to cool and dry than you have patience for and you should be okay.
Best Regards,

Andrew

Offline wizardgoat

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Re: Sinew backing a twisted/missaligned stave
« Reply #4 on: December 06, 2017, 08:34:10 am »
After making a bunch of sinew backed bows, I now only opt to use near flawless staves for then.
The process is so time consuming I just want the best chances of it surviving.
I've made small heat corrections with a fully cured sinew backing, on wood and horn bows.
I will add though, I've never made a sinew backed Osage bow.

Offline JNystrom

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Re: Sinew backing a twisted/missaligned stave
« Reply #5 on: December 06, 2017, 08:47:13 am »
Good, I think this just gave me the courage i needed. It is true that you don't want to waste time on bad staves, so you have to keep that in mind also. Thanks again.

Offline Stick Bender

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Re: Sinew backing a twisted/missaligned stave
« Reply #6 on: December 06, 2017, 09:02:43 am »
I agree with goat I had a lot of time processing 1100 grains of sinew and 16 weeks of cure time & the build on that bow before I had the issue I wont do it again on questionable stave sinew bows are forgiving but they dont mask bad wood !
If you fear failure you will never Try !

Offline JW_Halverson

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Re: Sinew backing a twisted/missaligned stave
« Reply #7 on: December 07, 2017, 12:10:36 pm »
I agree with goat I had a lot of time processing 1100 grains of sinew and 16 weeks of cure time & the build on that bow before I had the issue I wont do it again on questionable stave sinew bows are forgiving but they dont mask bad wood !

And even if you succeed in polishing a turd, take a good hard look at what have you got in your hand?
Sawdust.  It's man glitter.

Offline Limbit

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Re: Sinew backing a twisted/missaligned stave
« Reply #8 on: December 07, 2017, 07:26:40 pm »
I had that happen to a short sinew-backed mulberry bow I made once. While the sinew was drying on it, it twisted the tip on one side off alignment. Funny thing is that I had already left the tip quite thick just in case something like this happened. I think two things could have solved the problem now. 1: lay the sinew more carefully insuring that all the threads are totally straight. 2: keep the bow a bit longer or wider than you want so that you can shorten it or thin it if it decides to twist. Of course if it does a propeller twist, you are just screwed unless you leave the bow significantly thicker...which would eliminate the treated belly. In the future, I will be more careful when I select wood for a bow like this! My advice, just play it safe and use the best piece of wood you've got. Sinewing is a real time investment.