Author Topic: Bracing  (Read 301 times)

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Online DC

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Bracing
« on: October 10, 2018, 04:09:19 pm »
I started a warbow at our Cumberland Gathering. I figured there would be someone there that could pull it. As it turned out the only scale we had peaked at 100#. I worked the bow to 93#@ 20". It was also raining steady for the 3 days and I didn't want to get set. Anyway I now have this bow that I can't even move. Is there a method of bracing these things by yourself that I may not have seen? I'm not sure if I will be able to brace it using a second string. It doesn't help that I'm a little gunshy of the thing. I couldn't believe the string tension at low brace.
Vancouver Island
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Offline meanewood

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Re: Bracing
« Reply #1 on: October 10, 2018, 11:04:38 pm »
First thing to remember is 'Be Careful'!

When you start to get into the higher poundages, things get harder to do, starting with getting it strung.

If you use a step through method your spine is more vulnerable when twisting.

Using a stringer also makes you vulnerable when you lean over to locate the loop.

I use a stick, similar to a tiller stick, which has a notch in one end to take the stringer and a concave end with a piece of leather glued to it that prevents slipage. The stick needs to be long enough to hold the bow beyond brace height.

I generally sit down, put both feet on the stringer with the feet an inch or so apart. Have the stick in your lap ready to go. Pull the bow towards you far enough to place the slot on one end of the stick between your feet and onto the stringer and place the concave end onto the center of the bow. Ease the bow into this position so the stick takes all the tension. Now you can lean over and locate the bow string loop in the nock. Then take the tension back from the stick to remove the stick and allow the bow to settle into the braced position.

Reverse the procedure to unstring the bow!

Keep the stick as short as possible by using a stringer that is only just long enough to fit on the bow.

Offline JNystrom

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Re: Bracing
« Reply #2 on: October 11, 2018, 04:41:52 am »
Meanwood: can you show us your stringer setup? How you adjust the stringer on the nocks and such.

I had little problems with some 150 pounders and small nocks. For the next bows i will definitely make the nocks larger so there is leftover space in horn nocks to fit the stringer. I normally don't have any extra nock grooves made for the stringer.

Offline ohma2

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Re: Bracing
« Reply #3 on: October 11, 2018, 07:00:12 am »
That would be a very interesting video,i have wondered how the realy heavy ones were strung.
is that the more primitive method ? I cant imagine an army of thousands dropping down and stringing there bows in a hurry.

Online DC

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Re: Bracing
« Reply #4 on: October 11, 2018, 07:51:30 am »
Any sailors on here? Do you think a jam cleat could be trusted to hold a couple hundred pounds?
Vancouver Island
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Offline meanewood

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Re: Bracing
« Reply #5 on: October 11, 2018, 02:54:29 pm »
OK we only have one surviving horn nock from the' Mary Rose'.

It's about 65mm long and has one slot.
This could be the standard for both top and bottom or it could be a dedicated bottom nock.

There is evidence of two slots on some bow tips which may indicate that a second slot was cut into top nocks to hold a stringer!

It could also indicate that the maker used two slots when he was tillering the bow but once the bow had the horn nocks fitted, only one slot was cut into the horn.

I make my horn nocks 60-65mm long and have one slot cut into it for both top and bottom.

My Stinger is made the same way as my bow strings. It has a bowyers knot on one end and a running loop on the other.

The end with the bowyers knot sits on the lower limb pulled tight and rests up against the bowyers knot on the bow string which is sitting in the slot.

The running loop is placed on the upper nock about 10-15mm above the slot and pulled tight, because this is a self tightening knot combined with the fact that the horn tapers, it won't slip when pulled.

I suspect a second slot was cut into the top nock of the 'Mary Rose' bows but while this method works for me, I shall continue to make  top and bottom horn nocks the same.

The other thing to consider is when stringing the really heavy bows, the archers were in groups and it makes sense to help each other with one archer using both arms to pull up on the bow while another slips the loop into place!

Offline ravenbeak

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Re: Bracing
« Reply #6 on: October 12, 2018, 12:01:24 pm »
I have thought about using the crank winches used to pull boats up onto trailers.  They self lock as you get further and further.  I think it could work like a charm.
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Online DC

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Re: Bracing
« Reply #7 on: October 12, 2018, 02:01:30 pm »
Hi Jamie. I thought of that too. That's what Del uses I think. I'm just too tight to spend the bucks for one bow.
Vancouver Island
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Offline FilipT

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Re: Bracing
« Reply #8 on: October 14, 2018, 09:59:50 am »
I had the same problem when I making my first warbow last year. Every stringer stretched and it was impossible to brace the bow and dozens of posts sprung up in my thread with some people that couldn't believe I am struggling so much. Before first bracing bow was likely over 150 pounds. I managed to brace it immediately when I made stringer from nylon belt that was used to secure industrial cargo. That was it.

Just make a very good stringer and use deadlift technique to pull bow with one hand.

Online DC

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Re: Bracing
« Reply #9 on: October 14, 2018, 04:29:28 pm »
I decided that I'm going to modify my shooting machine slightly to brace the bow. It has a 2-1 reduction on it so it will make my life easier I think. I may have to replace the top tip on the bow as it may be a bit small to use either a running loop or a second nock. Maybe I 'll get to it tomorrow. Stuff keeps getting in the way.
Vancouver Island
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Online DC

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Re: Bracing
« Reply #10 on: October 15, 2018, 09:46:26 am »
I have thought about using the crank winches used to pull boats up onto trailers.  They self lock as you get further and further.  I think it could work like a charm.

I was just using one of those ratcheting cargo straps. They would probably work well too.
Vancouver Island
If you don't have any questions you must not be paying attention.