Author Topic: Tree id  (Read 760 times)

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Offline Pat B

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Re: Tree id
« Reply #15 on: April 17, 2019, 04:29:27 am »
Or possible a sawtooth oak(Quercus acutissima), native of China and planter here for wildlife. Where it takes a white oak 75 years from acorn to acorn the sawtooth will start producing in 6 to 7 years and after a few more yours produces lots of acorns. It is now considered an invasive exotic because it produces so many acorns so quickly. I think it is in the white oak family. It has an acorn like a white oak but twice as big. The leaves should tell.
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Offline SLIMBOB

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Re: Tree id
« Reply #16 on: April 17, 2019, 05:10:41 am »
Bark does't look like Post Oak.  Burr Oak maybe.  The leaves look similar to white oak leaves. Quercus Macrocarpa.
« Last Edit: April 17, 2019, 06:15:44 am by SLIMBOB »
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Offline Deerhunter21

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Re: Tree id
« Reply #17 on: April 17, 2019, 06:15:53 am »
it definitely has the unique leafs, egg shape, bottom of its fuzzy, no sharp parts, lots of predictable dips and curves symmetrical to the other side, like most oaks that have white wood. sorry i'm not really good at explaining leafs and i might have missed some details or got them wrong.
"Only when the last tree has died and the last river been poisoned and the last fish been caught will we realise we cannot eat money." Cree Native-American Proverb

Offline Deerhunter21

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Re: Tree id
« Reply #18 on: April 17, 2019, 06:16:20 am »
does the fuzzy bottom ring a bell?
"Only when the last tree has died and the last river been poisoned and the last fish been caught will we realise we cannot eat money." Cree Native-American Proverb

Offline SLIMBOB

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Re: Tree id
« Reply #19 on: April 17, 2019, 06:21:43 am »
Burr Oak is also known as Mossy Cup Oak. The acorn has a fuzzy cup.  “Finely dense pubescence” is how the bottom of the leaf is described.
« Last Edit: April 17, 2019, 06:30:23 am by SLIMBOB »
Liberty, In God We Trust, E Pluribus Unum.  Distinctly American Values.

Offline Deerhunter21

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Re: Tree id
« Reply #20 on: April 17, 2019, 09:32:30 am »
Yup I think we got it. fibrous acorn top, fuzzy leaf, they all match with burr oak. i think it's a Urban Pinnacle Oak tree which is a type of Burr oak. is burr oak a good bow wood?
« Last Edit: April 17, 2019, 09:38:32 am by Deerhunter21 »
"Only when the last tree has died and the last river been poisoned and the last fish been caught will we realise we cannot eat money." Cree Native-American Proverb

Offline SLIMBOB

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Re: Tree id
« Reply #21 on: April 17, 2019, 10:11:10 am »
Burr Oak is in the white oak family.  Don't make too much of that as Live Oak is in the Red Oak family and they are two different woods.  If it is Burr Oak, and we still aren't sure without a leaf or two.  But if it is, you'll just have to find someone who has used it as I have not.  Or make a bow with it and find out.
Liberty, In God We Trust, E Pluribus Unum.  Distinctly American Values.

Offline Hawkdancer

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Re: Tree id
« Reply #22 on: April 17, 2019, 08:43:27 pm »
Not sure about the id, but you plant corn when the oak leaves are as big as a squirrel's ear, and it will be knee high by the 4th of July!  And you will be able to id the tree! >:D. Maybe. All the oak trees around here are imported ornamentals.
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Life is far too serious to be taken that way!
Jerry

Offline Eric Krewson

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Re: Tree id
« Reply #23 on: April 18, 2019, 03:14:35 am »
Here is my post oak, without the foliage it has gnarly limbs and branches.