Author Topic: Improvising for hardware  (Read 500 times)

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Offline Woodely

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Improvising for hardware
« on: August 08, 2019, 01:19:29 am »
I could not find any sleeve material for the holes.  I went down to the Auto parts store and bought  a piece of 1/4"  brake line for a couple bucks.   The stainless marine hinge was only $10, The drill makes great for cutting and sanding, 1/4" line  makes a perfect match...:)
« Last Edit: August 08, 2019, 01:27:36 am by Woodely »
"Doing bad work is an exercise in futility, but honestly making mistakes is trying your best."

Offline bownarra

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Re: Improvising for hardware
« Reply #1 on: August 08, 2019, 01:23:44 am »
Glass bow

Offline Woodely

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Re: Improvising for hardware
« Reply #2 on: August 08, 2019, 01:29:29 am »
Wood bow 35# @ 66"
"Doing bad work is an exercise in futility, but honestly making mistakes is trying your best."

Offline Del the cat

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Re: Improvising for hardware
« Reply #3 on: August 08, 2019, 04:46:40 am »
Useful post, thanks... I may be making a carriage bow at some point :)
Del
Health warning, these posts may contain traces of nut.

Offline jeffhalfrack

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Re: Improvising for hardware
« Reply #4 on: August 08, 2019, 07:56:34 pm »
     
    OH boy ! Don't stop there this looks good jeffw

Offline Hamish

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Re: Improvising for hardware
« Reply #5 on: August 08, 2019, 08:04:58 pm »
My only concern is that by inletting the area for the hinge, you might have weakened the back. It really depends on how long your fades and dips are?  Hopefully you will be able to get away with it, you have a good chance as you only want 35lbs draw weight

Instead of inletting, for future bows build up leather around hinge and then shape to fit the hand.

Offline Woodely

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Re: Improvising for hardware
« Reply #6 on: August 09, 2019, 03:03:20 pm »
Have not weakened anything,  you don't know until you tried.  I shot the bow and its sturdy lots of meat in the handle for such work.   It would easily accept over 40#.
"Instead of inletting, for future bows build up leather around hinge and then shape to fit the hand."  No need for that...  build one for yourself,  its makes for a simple takedown and inexpensive to build.
"Doing bad work is an exercise in futility, but honestly making mistakes is trying your best."

Offline Hamish

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Re: Improvising for hardware
« Reply #7 on: August 09, 2019, 08:26:13 pm »
Glad it worked out for you. Would you post some pic's of the handle, fades, when braced so we can see how you were able to achieve success?

I have seen some failures(but still some successes) with the sleeve type takedown, when a guy cuts into the back, rather than keeping it intact. I suspect as long as the stress from bending is far enough away from the inlet it will be okay.

There were a couple of purpose built bow hinges available around  10-20 years ago.  New Moon Hinge, and another one that I can't think of at the moment. They were reproductions of 1940's hinges. They were quite expensive, no doubt due to limited production runs, for a specialist market.

 Robertson Stykbow also used to offer their own model, Connexion Hinge. I think they stopped offering them due to the high cost of manufacture. They are beautiful, precision pieces of work.  The bending part of the hinge extends into the handle side so it doesn't stick into your hand. The actual hinge comes apart. You fold the bow inwards, then slide the pieces sideways.

 Reading from a set of installation instructions " A WORD OF CAUTION: IF YOU INTEND TO RECESS THE CONNEXION, WE RECOMMEND YOU BUILD UP THE BACK OF THE HANDLE WITH MICARTA AND NOT CUT THROUGH THE BACK GLASS AS THIS MAY LEAD TO BOW FAILURE."

I will keep my eye out  for some marine type hinges, they look like a good option.

Offline PatM

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Re: Improvising for hardware
« Reply #8 on: August 09, 2019, 08:58:24 pm »
The old Grumley take downs were severely inlet on the back for the mechanism but in  quite a short area.

Offline Bob Barnes

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Re: Improvising for hardware
« Reply #9 on: August 09, 2019, 09:31:44 pm »
very cool... any more pictures?
Seems like common sense isn't very common any more...

Offline PatM

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Re: Improvising for hardware
« Reply #10 on: August 09, 2019, 10:31:27 pm »
I always made half hearted attempts to find decent hinges 1that might be bow suitable and this thread has lit the fire a bit more.

 Check out the flush hinges on here.    (fix gap in link)

https://w ww.hingeoutlet.com/collections/marine-hinges/products/s3830-0001

Offline Woodely

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Re: Improvising for hardware
« Reply #11 on: August 09, 2019, 11:25:12 pm »
That Hinge website is great, good link.   The big problem with that hinge I have is the center sticks out, its kind of a big wart on the handle, on the other hand it indexes my hold so I consistently hold the bow the same every time.   The other issue is I don't have a lock on the 2 limbs incase of breakage, will they pinch my fingers like a nut cracker... :)  I have another hinge sitting in the shop and I ground it down on one side so I can make a center shot bow.   I did some research a while back and noticed the first wooden bow having a hinge was sometime in the 17th. century.
The Connexion Hinge  is very sweet no doubt about it.

Does the hinge have to be in the center of the bow...?   My cognitive thinking is out to lunch these days.  Simple things baffle me.
I found this link on here about a hinge bow.
http://www.primitivearcher.com/smf/index.php?topic=55553.0
« Last Edit: August 09, 2019, 11:56:55 pm by Woodely »
"Doing bad work is an exercise in futility, but honestly making mistakes is trying your best."

Offline silent sniper

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Re: Improvising for hardware
« Reply #12 on: August 11, 2019, 07:37:57 pm »
Great topic!! I would love to try one of these at some point.

Great northern longbows still sells a hinged bow called the "jackknife" system. It is very similar to the hinge you used and works in the same fashion.
Keep up the great work!
Taylor.

Offline JW_Halverson

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Re: Improvising for hardware
« Reply #13 on: August 14, 2019, 09:43:30 am »
Useful post, thanks... I may be making a carriage bow at some point :)
Del

I have a vested interest in this!  Does anyone know of someone that makes carriage bow hinges?
Guns have triggers. Bicycles have wheels. Trees and bows have wooden limbs.