Author Topic: Target anxiety  (Read 174 times)

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Offline Kenneth

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Target anxiety
« on: May 22, 2020, 09:05:12 am »
I have made good and bad shots while hunting. Recently I made a really bad one. Thankfully the arrow just went off in the bushes and I later found it. I can say my form is not ingrained, in fact I only recently added some tweaks to my shooting style. Iím not real experienced in shooting nor bowhunting. I spend at least three days a week practicing. My shooting has really improved but it went to pieces when under hunting stress. I have never in my life made such a poor shot. My muscles just relaxed and I let the arrow go wherever. My head felt fuzzy and stupid and I was angry. It probably didnít help that my sixty pound bow is a little heavier than I was formerly used to (used to shoot forty to fifty pounds, average). But while practicing on targets I really was doing well with it.
I will have to practice on groundhogs this summer. I will not screw up while deer hunting this fall. Does anyone have any ideas for dealing with this? I dont want to waste arrows and opportunities and really donít want to hurt an animal without making a clean kill.  I know I need to make my form subconscious and get a lot of practice on small game. Any tips are appreciated.
« Last Edit: May 22, 2020, 09:08:26 am by Kenneth »

Offline Pat B

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Re: Target anxiety
« Reply #1 on: May 22, 2020, 12:17:34 pm »
Lots of practice and plenty of concentration! For practice it's not how many arrows you shoot but making each one count. You do have to practice enough to build your muscle memory and your archery muscles in general so shoot one arrow at a time and make it count, recover that arrow and shoot it again with purpose.  As far as buck fever I try to concentrate on where the arrow will hit the deer from first sighting. Concentrate on the kill zone and not on the deer. If you shoot at the deer you will shoot over it.
 When I first started shooting I would shoot 50 to 100 arrows at each session. Once I got my muscle memory I reduced that to a dozen or so each session and a week or so before my hunt I'd take one shot a day, either in the early morning or after sunset when I usually saw most deer. Being over bowed can really put a hurting on your shooting when crunch time comes. Trying to draw a heavy bow while everything else is happening can lead to failure so if you are shooting the heavier bow be sure you can draw it smoothly with very little extra movement. A 45# to 50# bow will kill a deer just as easily as a 60# bow especially if you are more comfortable at shooting it.
Make the most of all that comes and the least of all that goes!    Pat Brennan  Brevard, NC

Offline JW_Halverson

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Re: Target anxiety
« Reply #2 on: May 22, 2020, 07:30:03 pm »
My target as seen me shoot many times. It feels no anxiety, whatsoever.
Guns have triggers. Bicycles have wheels. Trees and bows have wooden limbs.

Offline Kenneth

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Re: Target anxiety
« Reply #3 on: May 22, 2020, 09:44:49 pm »
Lots of practice and plenty of concentration! For practice it's not how many arrows you shoot but making each one count. You do have to practice enough to build your muscle memory and your archery muscles in general so shoot one arrow at a time and make it count, recover that arrow and shoot it again with purpose.  As far as buck fever I try to concentrate on where the arrow will hit the deer from first sighting. Concentrate on the kill zone and not on the deer. If you shoot at the deer you will shoot over it.
 When I first started shooting I would shoot 50 to 100 arrows at each session. Once I got my muscle memory I reduced that to a dozen or so each session and a week or so before my hunt I'd take one shot a day, either in the early morning or after sunset when I usually saw most deer. Being over bowed can really put a hurting on your shooting when crunch time comes. Trying to draw a heavy bow while everything else is happening can lead to failure so if you are shooting the heavier bow be sure you can draw it smoothly with very little extra movement. A 45# to 50# bow will kill a deer just as easily as a 60# bow especially if you are more comfortable at shooting it.
Iím sure Iím overbowed right now for hunting. Maybe Iíll have changed that by October. Sounds like a workable routine. I think focusing on one spot will help with the anxiety, maybe. I hope so. Thanks for the insight.
 
My target as seen me shoot many times. It feels no anxiety, whatsoever.
. I mean to throw some fear into mine.

Offline Hawkdancer

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Re: Target anxiety
« Reply #4 on: May 22, 2020, 11:41:04 pm »
No pictures?!  It didn't happen! 
Life is far too serious to be taken that way!
Jerry

Offline Kenneth

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Re: Target anxiety
« Reply #5 on: May 23, 2020, 10:56:27 am »
No pictures?!  It didn't happen! 
True

Offline Hawkdancer

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Re: Target anxiety
« Reply #6 on: May 23, 2020, 12:12:17 pm »
Mean't to add:  (lol) (lol)!  Pat B has some real good advice. But if you can shoot very good at 40-50#, and does the job, why go heavier?  Good luck with your program, and only eat on the days you practice >:D (-P (lol)
Hawkdancer
Life is far too serious to be taken that way!
Jerry

Offline Kenneth

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Re: Target anxiety
« Reply #7 on: May 24, 2020, 05:47:47 am »
Mean't to add:  (lol) (lol)!  Pat B has some real good advice. But if you can shoot very good at 40-50#, and does the job, why go heavier?  Good luck with your program, and only eat on the days you practice >:D (-P (lol)
Hawkdancer

The reason I wanted to shoot sixty pounds is rather convoluted and personalized. I decided to stick with just shoot shafts, around here in Central Pa rose is everywhere, so thatís what I use. Now it has this pith through the middle. I was making arrows which I was sanding down close to the correct spine for fifty pounds. This pith was making me uncomfortable because the diameter was so small by the time the arrow was finished, it left the walls around the pith too thin. I did sinew wrap some of them and I never had one split out, but it made me nervous. Further, the finished arrows are heavy, like in the 650-700 grain range. And some of the arrows ďclackedĒ off the side of the bow, which I heard meant overspined. So I made some arrows with safety in mind and shot them from my sixty pound bows and they shot great, no clacking and clanking, right straight. So yes, I know I could solve the spine problem by making my arrows longer or upping the head weight, but Iím pretty comfortable with the head design and arrow length which flies well out of a sixty pound bow. I decided to just put in the work to use the heavier bow.